Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 9)

LITTLE LABORS by Rivka Galchen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"A talented writer delivers a miscellany about her maternal transformation."
An engaging mind offers reflections on being a mother, being a writer, and having a baby. Read full book review >
Part of the Family by Jason Hensley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 14, 2016

"An invaluable illumination of small acts of astonishing bravery and generosity in the darkest days of war."
A compassionate, detailed account of a little-known corner of World War II history. Read full book review >

Revising Genesis by James Quatro
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
A New Science by Mukesh Prasad
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"While exploring a rich variety of topics, from climate change to Einstein, this collection of scientific thoughts lacks polish."
A scientific freethinker draws on his Usenet posts to argue for reinterpretations of mainstream theories. Read full book review >
Peter Thiel by Richard Byrne Reilly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2016

"A short, scattered introduction to Thiel's worldview in his own words."
A compilation of entrepreneur Peter Thiel's thoughts on seemingly everyone and everything. Read full book review >

THE PRESIDENTS AND THE CONSTITUTION by Ken Gormley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 10, 2016

"A useful, educational tome featuring top-drawer contributors—though female scholars are woefully underrepresented."
A fluidly fashioned collection of essays about how the roster of American presidents shaped the executive duties as defined in the Constitution. Read full book review >
DAVE HILL DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE by Dave Hill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"Hill makes an amiable companion, and if his stories aren't earth-shattering, his unforced humor is worth a few chuckles."
An unassuming and amusing collection of essays that touches lightly on the modest events of a believably undramatic life. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CLOD by Gary Snyder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2016

"Elegant and thoughtful, with much to read between the lines in commentary on a long life's work. Students and admirers of Snyder will be enchanted and intrigued."
The noted poet and essayist returns with a deceptively small book enfolding a lifetime's worth of study. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 6, 2016

"A comprehensive, erudite narrative that traces the history of a group dedicated to exploring alternative and effective patient care delivery."
A book examines the pioneering evolution of a health care initiative centered on mind-body medicine. Read full book review >
ON FRIENDSHIP by Alexander Nehamas
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 3, 2016

"For those wanting to see how the concept of friendship in Western civilization has evolved since Aristotle, this study offers a useful, if idiosyncratic survey."
This conceptual exploration of friendship sees both the good and the bad. Read full book review >
HOW ENGLISH BECAME ENGLISH by Simon Horobin
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A happy mixture of scholarship, clear writing, and humor."
A linguistics scholar glances at the history of the English language and takes on some contentious contemporary issues—from "fewer" and "less" to the relationship between language and social status. Read full book review >
Islam: Religion or Fascism? by William Foltney
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 29, 2016

"A useful primer on political fascism, but less impressive as an introduction to Muslim thought."
A contentious debut critique of Islamism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >