Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >
HOME AND AWAY by Karl Ove Knausgaard
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though the correspondence is mostly about soccer, it is also about so much more."
An epistolary exploration of soccer and life. Read full book review >

THE CORRESPONDENCE by J.D. Daniels
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"An uncommonly auspicious debut."
The debut collection by an essayist who writes like a rattlesnake, his sentences coiled yet always ready to strike with venomous impact. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A wide-ranging, irreverent, and absorbing meditation on thinking, knowing, and being."
What are we? That question informs the author's fertile inquiry into mind, brain, and imagination. Read full book review >
TALKING GOD by Gary Gutting
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An exceptional introduction to the philosophical questions surrounding God and atheism."
Approachable, civilized discussions about the existence of God. Read full book review >

EAT LIVE LOVE DIE by Betty Fussell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A dazzling showcase for Fussell's delicious ability to 'taste...words with the kind of pleasure that turns cooking fires into the fires of love.'"
The idiosyncratic food writer harvests some of her best work in a savory collection that doubles as a memoir and declaration of faith. Read full book review >
DEFACTO FEMINISM by Judy Juanita
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 31, 2016

"The author refers to herself as 'an observational ironist,' and her incisive comments on black life's contradictions make this essay collection a winner."
This extraordinary set of autobiographical essays gives insight into a black woman's life in the arts: everything from joining the Black Panthers to avoiding African-American chick lit. Read full book review >
THE 60S by The New Yorker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"The hits continue. Bring on the '70s."
The third installment in the esteemed magazine's superb decades series. Read full book review >
THE PEOPLE AND THE BOOKS by Adam Kirsch
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A fascinating, impeccably written, personal tour of the great books of Judaism."
How to read the Jewish past. Read full book review >
WE GON' BE ALRIGHT by Jeff Chang
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations."
In this collection, written "in appreciation of all the young people who would not bow down," outspoken journalist Chang (Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post-Civil Rights America, 2014, etc.) offers six critical essays addressing racial inequality and inequity and how these provocative, multifaceted issues impact virtually every culture. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Essential for all students of sports history and of photography and a fine gift for buffs as well."
Superb anthology of sports photographs, coupled with an illuminating text exploring the making of images both iconic and unknown. Read full book review >
THE VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS by Neil Gaiman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 31, 2016

"Gaiman's many fans will love this collection, which showcases the author's wit, wisdom, and deep appreciation for art and the people who make it."
The acclaimed author shares his thoughts on stories of all kinds: books, comics, movies, music, and more. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >