Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

JACKSON, 1964 by Calvin Trillin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 28, 2016

"Haunting pieces that show how our window on the past is often a mirror."
A veteran reporter collects some significant pieces about race that originally appeared in the New Yorker, his publishing home since 1963. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 28, 2016

"An absolute must for any Star Trek fan."
"Boldly go where no man has gone before": the oral history of the Star Trek franchise. Read full book review >

HOGS WILD by Ian Frazier
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 7, 2016

"Pieces that show Frazier's ranging curiosity, lucent style, and capacious heart."
The veteran humorist and reporter for the New Yorker presents a collection of pieces that record his pursuits of wild hogs, hermit crabs, Asian carp, a Styrofoam substitute, and numerous other quarry. Read full book review >
BLACK MAN, WHITE HOUSE by D.L. Hughley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Funny, insightful, and legitimately illuminating."
The Obama years, through a glass cleverly. Read full book review >
THE GEEK FEMINIST REVOLUTION by Kameron Hurley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 31, 2016

"Passion and commitment permeate the writing as Hurley illuminates the online cultural vanguard from a feminist's perspective."
A feminist manifesto from the front lines of fantasy fiction, Internet flaming, and Gamergate battles. Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 31, 2016

"A wide-ranging, toothsome smorgasbord of Gotham's good eats and the tireless men and women behind each plate."
Exuberant New York chefs and restaurateurs share their culinary histories. Read full book review >
THE VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS by Neil Gaiman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 31, 2016

"Gaiman's many fans will love this collection, which showcases the author's wit, wisdom, and deep appreciation for art and the people who make it."
The acclaimed author shares his thoughts on stories of all kinds: books, comics, movies, music, and more. Read full book review >
READING AND WRITING CANCER by Susan Gubar
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal."
For cancer sufferers, words can lift the spirit. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CLOD by Gary Snyder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2016

"Elegant and thoughtful, with much to read between the lines in commentary on a long life's work. Students and admirers of Snyder will be enchanted and intrigued."
The noted poet and essayist returns with a deceptively small book enfolding a lifetime's worth of study. Read full book review >
REAL ARTISTS HAVE DAY JOBS by Sara Benincasa
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 26, 2016

"Raunchy and unabashedly unapologetic, this is useful, take-no-prisoners humor."
Raw and ribald advice for growing up. Read full book review >
CALLINGS by Dave Isay
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"Inspiring, insightful, and thoroughly readable."
A distinguished public radio producer's collection of conversations with Americans who "found…their way to doing exactly what they were meant to do with their lives." Read full book review >
FAR AND AWAY by Andrew Solomon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"Agile, informative, even revelatory pieces that, together, show us both the great variety of humanity and the interior of a gifted writer's heart."
A veteran journalist and travel writer collects pieces dating back to the late 1980s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >