Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

LADIES NIGHT AT THE DREAMLAND by Sonja Livingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Wise, fresh, captivating essays."
Radiant essays inspired by "slivers and bits" of real women's lives. Read full book review >
THE GIRLS IN MY TOWN by Angela Morales
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Essays that are as thematically ambitious as they are deeply personal."
Morales (English/Glendale Community Coll.) debuts with a compellingly rendered collection of essays, the winner of the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize.Read full book review >

CRUSH by Cathy Alter
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 5, 2016

"The seemingly lightweight premise of an anthology built around celebrity crushes yields an outstanding selection of poignant and thought-provoking stories."
A few dozen writers recall their childhood infatuations with celebrated media stars or iconic characters (literary or animated) and how these crushes influenced their future lives. Read full book review >
WIND SPRINTS by Joseph Epstein
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 7, 2016

"Another subtitle might have been Healthful Snacks, for these bite-size pieces are both enjoyable to ingest and good for you."
A master of the essay form returns with a collection of brief pieces spanning nearly 20 years, 1996 to 2015. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >