Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

JACKSON, 1964 by Calvin Trillin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 28, 2016

"Haunting pieces that show how our window on the past is often a mirror."
A veteran reporter collects some significant pieces about race that originally appeared in the New Yorker, his publishing home since 1963. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 28, 2016

"An absolute must for any Star Trek fan."
"Boldly go where no man has gone before": the oral history of the Star Trek franchise. Read full book review >

CRITICS, MONSTERS, FANATICS, AND OTHER LITERARY ESSAYS by Cynthia Ozick
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 5, 2016

"Often intricate and lovely leaves from the author's literary tree."
A veteran and venerated literary essayist, critic, and novelist collects some recent (some previously unpublished) reviews and essays. Read full book review >
WHO SHOT SPORTS by Gail Buckland
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Essential for all students of sports history and of photography and a fine gift for buffs as well."
Superb anthology of sports photographs, coupled with an illuminating text exploring the making of images both iconic and unknown. Read full book review >
LOVE AND RUIN by Evan Ratliff
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 26, 2016

"An eclectic, never-boring collection."
Atavist magazine editor Ratliff brings together 10 pieces of journalism selected from the site's five-year history. Read full book review >

THE ACCIDENTAL LIFE by Terry McDonell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A wide-ranging, smart, and witty collection testifying to an impressive career."
The former editor of Rolling Stone, Esquire, and Sports Illustrated looks back. Read full book review >
THE FIRE THIS TIME by Jesmyn Ward
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely contributions to an urgent national conversation."
Poets, scholars, and essayists reflect on race in America. Read full book review >
NOW I SIT ME DOWN by Witold Rybczynski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"Rybczynski is totally engaging in this smoothly flowing, sharp, witty narrative—another winner from a top-notch writer on design."
The acclaimed popularizer and purveyor of all things architectural scrutinizes a "tool for sitting." Read full book review >
WASTING TIME ON THE INTERNET by Kenneth Goldsmith
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"Goldsmith outlines a future that perhaps offers a hope we can embrace, since a retreat seems impossible."
A persuasive argument about how what conventional wisdom dismisses as "wasting time" is actually time well spent. Read full book review >
PLAY ALL by Clive James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"A gentler companion to Harlan Ellison's The Glass Teat (1970), the only flaw of which is that it's too short, leaving readers wanting more."
Eminent literary and cultural critic James (Latest Readings, 2015, etc.) comes back to an old beat: reviewing the offerings on the small screen. Read full book review >
TAKE TO THE HIGHWAY by Bryce Milligan
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Sure-handed verse work in multiple registers."
In a new collection "for travelers," Milligan sometimes races and sometimes tools along; no matter the speed, it's a pleasing ride. Read full book review >
SENIOR MOMENTS by Willard Spiegelman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Spiegelman's preference for masters of 'cool clarity, sharpened perception, and a transparent style' is revealed in his own writing, which is lucid and propulsive, opening portals to heightened enjoyment of the time we have."
A wide-ranging collection of essays reflecting the septuagenarian author's rejection of the more hysterical predictions of cultural doom. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >