Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

YOU, TOO, COULD WRITE A POEM by David Orr
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Orr says the greatest compliment for any critic 'is to say that you found yourself thinking of his writing the next time you encountered a good poem.' He abundantly deserves that same praise."
Fresh, vigorous, spirited views on poets and their work. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >

HOME AND AWAY by Karl Ove Knausgaard
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though the correspondence is mostly about soccer, it is also about so much more."
An epistolary exploration of soccer and life. Read full book review >
SCRATCH by Manjula Martin
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Highly recommended for both experienced and aspiring authors and for avid readers who want to learn the back stories of the contributors."
The founder of the online journal Scratch, loaded with information about how authors labor to earn a livelihood, collects essays and interviews that appeared online and supplements those with original offerings. Read full book review >
THE CORRESPONDENCE by J.D. Daniels
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"An uncommonly auspicious debut."
The debut collection by an essayist who writes like a rattlesnake, his sentences coiled yet always ready to strike with venomous impact. Read full book review >

DISORDERLY FAMILIES by Arlette Farge
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 1, 2017

"An enlightening compilation that will leave historically inclined readers wanting to dig a little further into the archives."
The first English translation of letters from the Bastille archives reveals a compelling array of domestic difficulties in French families across the board. Read full book review >
BOOKS FOR LIVING by Will Schwalbe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"In an age when the number of readers is declining, a delightful book like this might just snare a few new recruits."
A self-help book about books. Read full book review >
WAVEFORM by Marcia Aldrich
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 15, 2016

"Eclectic and always engaging."
Essays by 30 contemporary women writers whose work has helped remake the nonfiction literary landscape. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A wide-ranging, irreverent, and absorbing meditation on thinking, knowing, and being."
What are we? That question informs the author's fertile inquiry into mind, brain, and imagination. Read full book review >
A LITERARY TOUR OF ITALY by Tim Parks
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"The author's deep familiarity with Italian culture informs these intelligent, perceptive essays."
A prolific novelist, memoirist, literary critic, and translator investigates "Italy's collective imagination." Read full book review >
TALKING GOD by Gary Gutting
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An exceptional introduction to the philosophical questions surrounding God and atheism."
Approachable, civilized discussions about the existence of God. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An intimate and entertaining look at a fake-news program whose caustic, witty alchemy remains missed by many."
A lively oral history of The Daily Show focused on Jon Stewart's improbable transformation from basic-cable comic to progressive conscience. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >