Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

THE MEANING OF THE LIBRARY by Alice Crawford
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 1, 2015

"A rich, informative, and engaging collection."
The invention and reinvention of libraries. Read full book review >
NOTE BOOK by Jeff Nunokawa
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2015

"An engaging multimedia project offering even more food for thought when translated to the linearity of the printed page."
Literary-based reflections on and of the virtual age. Read full book review >

Confessions of a Time Traveler by R. Gary Raham
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 4, 2015

"A welcome excursion for pop-sci fans, featuring a number of striking artworks."
In this diverse collectionof essays, short stories, illustrations, anecdotes, and other missives, Raham informs without being dry and teaches without being pedantic while covering a wide range of subjects in biology and the history of science.Read full book review >
LIVING INTO THE MYSTERY by Kelli Summers Sorg
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 13, 2014

"A gentle, understatedly wise collection of reflections on issues of modern Christian faith."
An award-winning television producer and pastor collects letters she's sent to spiritual inquirers far and wide. Read full book review >
Making A Living, Making A Life by Daniel Rose
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 18, 2014

"A wise, well-honed collection of speeches that address vital issues with fresh, penetrating insight."
A real estate developer and philanthropist presents a masterful debut collection of exceptionally cogent and timely speeches and essays. Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 5, 2015

"An intelligent rallying cry for anyone seeking a safe and healthy food supply, and all that entails."
When a book begins with an essay titled "A Food Manifesto for the Future," you know the author is on a mission. Read full book review >
THE DAEMON KNOWS by Harold Bloom
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"As always, Bloom conveys the intimate, urgent, compelling sense of why it matters that we read these canonical authors."
Elegiac, gracious literary ponderings that group and compare 12 giants of American literature. Read full book review >
THE PRINCE OF MINOR WRITERS by Max Beerbohm
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 2, 2015

"Urbane, witty pieces by a writer worth reviving."
Elegant essays by a self-described dilettante. Read full book review >
KEEPERS by Richard Schickel
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 23, 2015

"Schickel found writing this collection 'a rather playful business'; readers will find it infused with his joy."
A noted critic celebrates the pleasure of movies. Read full book review >
MY GENERATION by William Styron
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 2, 2015

"Wide-ranging, lucid, and incisive."
A rich collection by an estimable writer. Read full book review >
CITY BY CITY by Keith Gessen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 12, 2015

"From Whittier, Alaska, to Williston, North Dakota, to Palm Coast, Florida, these varied essays offer compelling snapshots of how Americans live, move, and work."
In these 37 singular essays, some reading like research papers, others as personal as memoirs, n+1 editor Gessen (All the Sad Young Literary Men, 2008, etc.) and Harvard graduate student Squibb find in certain American cities the crucible of enormous change since the financial meltdown of 2008.Read full book review >
WHERE I'M READING FROM by Tim Parks
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 12, 2015

"'Do We Need Stories?' 'Why Finish Books?' 'What's Wrong with the Nobel?' 'Does Money Make Us Write Better?' Readers vexed by such questions will welcome Parks' thoughtful responses."
Why do books matter? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >