GIFT OF THE MOUNTAINS by Ester Wier

GIFT OF THE MOUNTAINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The comparison with Tuchin's Mayan Treasure reported in the last issue of the Bulletin on p. 557(J-189) is inevitable, for both make use of the Latin American background and the same dilemma-- that of the Indians emerging into the 20th Century with the drawstrings of superstition holding them back. Here we have Indito, a half Indian Mexican boy. His family are peons and his younger sister was born blind. When he stumbles on a fabled buried treasure of lost gold in the foot hills where he gathered wood, his fear of the gold and the snake that seems to be guarding it goes to war with his knowledge of his family's need, and the battle against superstition that the young priest, Father Luis, has been carrying on. Tuchin is much the better book because it is much less crowded with people and motives. Here one gets a little lost as the family, their landlord, the Church and the whole community are unsuccessfully introduced into what started so well as a story about a young boy.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1963
Publisher: McKay