I NEVER WANTED TO BE FAMOUS by Eth Clifford

I NEVER WANTED TO BE FAMOUS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Clifford's books are always a delight. Timely themes such as adults projecting their own needs for recognition onto children and the consequences of sudden fame are treated incisively but with a farcical overlay. Goodwin (Goody) Tribble, 13, lives in happy obscurity in Four Corners, until he saves a baby from choking and is hailed a hero. Thus begins a nightmare: Goody's family is interviewed by a reporter from a local newspaper who misspells his name ""Dribble""; gifts arrive; his ambitious Mom sets about planning his future as a celebrity; and his English teacher, ""Iron Horse"" Moss, casts him in her musical version of Romeo and Juliet. During a rehearsal, Goody unwittingly saves ""Juliet"" from injury when she falls off a ladder. Twice a hero, Goody is touted by ""Juliet's"" father, a bait salesman known as the Worm King of the Midwest, and by the Men's Club as presidential material. To escape, Goody visits his grandmother, a feisty farm woman. An encounter in grandma's cow pasture with an escaped circus gorilla named Buster provides Goody with his third heroic act. Finally, while on a trip to Washington, Goody decides he'd like to be a page and possibly a lawmaker someday, worthy, meaningful ambitions that Goody has discovered on his own. Goody is a real winner: a thoughtful, caring, perceptive kid who has all the right stuff. Readers will appreciate his dilemma and applaud his new found sense of self. A must-read--and not just for Clifford fans.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1986
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin