AMBULANCE IN AFRICA by Evan Thomas

AMBULANCE IN AFRICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

While this overlaps to some extent the factual content of Geer's Mercy in Well (Whittlesey-P. 256), it is a more personal, more human book, with an alert quality which makes it good reading. Thomas worked under Geer in the American Field Service, which he joined before the end of his Senior year at Princeton. His were mixed motives and the crossing on a crowded troopship emphasized the worst of them. He recognised, candidly, that he had been looking largely for glamor and ""a slightly dangerour humanitarian "". It took some months before he found that he was doing the job for the job's sake. He reports leisurely days in Deir Ez Zer and Palmyra, then the real thing in Tobruk, Matruh and Alamein. With the fall of Tobruk, things got very thick, and Thomas had several very close shaves. Then came the early victories of the British 8th Army and at this point he resigned, to join the Navy. A good amount of self-deflating and debunking and straight thinking about the war, its casualties and implications, and the personal angle.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1943
Publisher: Appleton-Century