FTER NORA SLAMMED THE DOOR by Eve Morriam

FTER NORA SLAMMED THE DOOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Morton Hunt had a good many more statistics to support his discussion piece on women (Her Infinite Variety- 1960), among them the fact that there are 14,7000 books about them in the N.Y. Public Library. Since that time there have been a number more, notably The Feminine Mystique. Mrs. Merriam, relying less on the printed word and more on the cellophane cliches of the commercials adroitly converted to satire (as she did in Fig. Leaf, her book on fashion), has some edgy things to say about Nora's ""unfinished revolution""--she has lost her place in the home but hasn't found it in the world. The house-wife is dependent and the chatelaine doesn't want to be a chattel; if she works, she gets a subsidiary job and a paycheck with an automatic deduction; Big Momma is a myth; the single woman is no better off; and then there are all the semantics of sex segregation which indicate that the lost sex is comprised of second class citizens. Vive la difference? By no means, we must review and revise the meaning of the family in a with-soap-it's-loaded culture created by the media.... Somewhere between the pep talk and the polemic, this still doesn't quite bridge the distance between the magazine article and the book. And of course it's a ""woman's book,"" another one of those unfortunate distinctions women have every right to resent.

Pub Date: June 23rd, 1964
Publisher: World