HOLLYWOOD WHEN SILENTS WERE GOLDEN by Evelyn F. Scott

HOLLYWOOD WHEN SILENTS WERE GOLDEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A middy blouse and crepe bloomered account of a childhood on the edge of the infant industry since at the age of five Evelyn went to Hollywood where her mother, Beulah Marie Dix, an author of 28 books including a juvenile (Merrylips), went to work as a script/continuity writer. This was in the early days of de Mille and Lasky and Evelyn went to school with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Jesse Jr. and Harlean who became Jean Harlow. And after school there were those costume parties. And here, there and everywhere you'll find some humor (her hat ""looked like a mobcap bred to a souffle"") and cheerfulness even when things went wrong (her father's bankruptcy) at the intersection of Hollywood and Vine, or naivete and nostalgia. A pert reminiscence which outclasses Frances Marion's Off With Their Heads (scheduled for June) while essentially covering the same distance.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1972
Publisher: McGraw-Hill