BUT I THOUGHT YOU REALLY LOVED ME by Evelyn W. Minshull

BUT I THOUGHT YOU REALLY LOVED ME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Except that the writing is worse, this is much in the spirit of Eyerley's Bonnie Jo, Go Home (1972). This time round, teenaged Koral's desire for abortion is ruled out by her parents and she's signed into Haven House, a strict and strictly Christian home for unwed mothers Which, oddly, shares the same building as a children's home. In between sad, scatty encounters with an old lady from town who knits booties for all the girls (though few plan to keep their babies) and the intermittent dramas of the other crudely differentiated Haven House reisdents, Koral comes to forgive her parents and accept their view of character-building--which compares Koral's rebelliousness to the skittish freedom-loving nature of her pony, Gusty. Gusty, who's been in the habit of running off, is finally confined for his own good and promptly breaks his neck trying to jump his stall, but the author seems blissfully unaware that her analogy has gone awry. For readers, this is just one of a number of episodes that won't wash and there is simply too much misty sermonizing and too little physical detail about pregnancy (which, we'd assume, girls living in such a home must discuss among themselves).

Pub Date: Oct. 18th, 1976
Publisher: Westminster