THE DIXIE FRONTIER by Everett Dick

THE DIXIE FRONTIER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As part of the regional revival, this recreates vigorously, vividly, the rude, reckless, shiftless, stoic life of the Dixie frontier,- the men and women who settled there in new country. Opened up by Daniel Boone's Wilderness Road in 1775, larger migrations were to follow:- squatters, the ""cutting edge of the frontier""; planters and their slaves; land speculators. Here was the life in stations and on plantations; early methods of marketing and trading; the social occasions; the sports-which were sanguinary; the formation of new towns; schools- as they grew up; religion (in pretty general lack) and revivalism; law, justice and politics; food and clothes, idiosyncrasies of speech and behaviour; Indians- and the militia. A portrait of a section and a phase of America which does not lack for colorful, informative detail.

Pub Date: Feb. 9th, 1947
Publisher: Knopf