WHITE COLORS by F. D. Reeve

WHITE COLORS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

By no means as straightforward as The Brother, most of this takes place in the head of Richard, an adolescent, which houses a ""tiger of the imagination"" while he deliberately keeps his distance from most of the people around him, particularly his mother. Richard is sure he will do something very different -- ""Being is becoming. Most people are nothing."" But he's still only becoming in his obdurately self-contained fashion, involved only rarely -- with Marcia, a gift who dies; with Leslie who allures him sensually and also with his sister Sandra who attracts him on the same parallel. Reeve (a poet as well as a novelist) uses an improvisational technique where formulae, words, jingles, questions and open-ended possibilities all bob gently in the associative commotion and the chances are that the novel might dissipate altogether if you try to lay a hand on it.

Pub Date: Dec. 5th, 1973
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux