Young wildlife lovers will embrace this intriguing rehabilitation account.

THE AMAZING TRUE STORIES OF PEPITO THE SQUIRREL

An injured squirrel develops a close relationship with the retired doctor who helps him in this debut nonfiction picture book that features rhymes.

On a day when “the man” was busy hurrying through a huge to-do list, he noticed an incapacitated squirrel, who crawled onto his boot. An animal lover and retired physician, the man decided to care for the squirrel, whom he named Pepito, and nurse him back to health. After trying a bunch of foods and discovering Pepito liked pineapple best, the new wildlife rehabilitator examined the squirrel’s legs, concluding that the animal injured a nerve. The man built a “contraption, of wire and rope, / It was like a cone, with a minor slope!” so that Pepito could perform physical therapy in the retiree’s house. Once Pepito started feeling better, he escaped from his plastic bin and hid in the dust collector, and the man and his partner had to find him. Soon, Pepito recovered enough to return to nature, but he remained loyal to the man who nurtured him. Erebia convincingly parallels the squirrel’s rehabilitation with the man’s own sense of slowing down, taking time to appreciate nature rather than rushing from task to task. While the rhyming pairs are sometimes wordy—or convoluted—the meaning comes through clearly. The author’s edited photographs focus on Pepito, with textures adjusted to feel almost painterly, giving an artistic twist to a realistic story.

Young wildlife lovers will embrace this intriguing rehabilitation account.

Pub Date: Feb. 14, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-73608-580-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Feworks

Review Posted Online: April 14, 2021

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For many readers, uneasy optics will take the fun out of this romp.

LLAMA UNLEASHES THE ALPACALYPSE

From the Llama Book series

Llamas, alpacas, and clones—oh my!

In this sequel to Llama Destroys the World (2019), hapless Llama once again wreaks unintentional, large-scale havoc—but this time, he (sort of) saves the day, too. After making an epic breakfast (and epic mess), Llama decides to build a machine that will enable him to avoid cleaning up. No, not a vacuum or dishwasher: It’s a machine that Llama uses to clone his friend “of impeccable tidiness,” Alpaca, in order to create an “army of cleaners.” Cream-colored Llama and light-brown Alpaca, both male, are pear shaped with short, stubby legs, bland expressions, and bulging eyes. Paired with the cartoon illustrations, the text’s comic timing shines: “Llama invited Alpaca over for lunch. / Llama invited Alpaca into the Replicator 3000. / And then, Llama invited disaster.” Soon the house is full of smiling Alpacas in purple scalloped aprons, single-mindedly cleaning—and, as one might expect, things don’t go as planned. Mealtimes (i.e. “second lunch” and dinner) offer opportunities for the “alpacalypse” to emerge from Llama’s house into the wider world. Everyday life grinds to a halt as the myriad Alpacas bearing mops, dusters, and plungers continue their cleaning crusade with no signs of stopping. That is, until the Alpacas realize they are hungry….It’s all very funny, but the sight of the paler-coated Llama exploiting the darker-coated Alpaca, for whom nothing brings “more joy than cleaning,” is an uncomfortable one.

For many readers, uneasy optics will take the fun out of this romp. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-22285-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: March 29, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2020

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A simple but effective look at a keystone species.

IF YOU TAKE AWAY THE OTTER

Sea otters are the key to healthy kelp forests on the Pacific coast of North America.

There have been several recent titles for older readers about the critical role sea otters play in the coastal Pacific ecosystem. This grand, green version presents it to even younger readers and listeners, using a two-level text and vivid illustrations. Biologist Buhrman-Deever opens as if she were telling a fairy tale: “On the Pacific coast of North America, where the ocean meets the shore, there are forests that have no trees.” The treelike forms are kelp, home to numerous creatures. Two spreads show this lush underwater jungle before its king, the sea otter, is introduced. A delicate balance allows this system to flourish, but there was a time that hunting upset this balance. The writer is careful to blame not the Indigenous peoples who had always hunted the area, but “new people.” In smaller print she explains that Russian explorations spurred the development of an international fur trade. Trueman paints the scene, concentrating on an otter family threatened by formidable harpoons from an abstractly rendered person in a small boat, with a sailing ship in the distance. “People do not always understand at first the changes they cause when they take too much.” Sea urchins take over; a page turn reveals a barren landscape. Happily, the story ends well when hunting stops and the otters return…and with them, the kelp forests.

A simple but effective look at a keystone species. (further information, select bibliography, additional resources) (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: May 26, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7636-8934-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Jan. 28, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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