THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN by F. N. Monjo

THE VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Fred Grant, telling of how 'Pa and me caught the Rebs at Vicksburg,' has something on Quentin Roosevelt (The One Bad Thing About Father, 1970): at thirteen he's a soldier, even ""a veteran."" The men call him that, Pa says, because he was wounded (""sort of""); he doesn't tell Pa that he's ""The Old Man."" Admiration tempered with good-natured raillery all around (not sparing Lincoln's skepticism or Grant's drinking) marks Fred's chronicle of the Vicksburg campaign from the Union ships running the gauntlet to the crossing at Bruinsburg, the march through enemy territory, and the decisive siege, Often the grimmer aspects of war, and of this war, impinge: a plantation is sacked to supply the troops, slaves join up, the dead of both sides line the route. To all of this Douglas Gorsline's battle map and camera-eye drawings add documentary substantiation -- but their extent is such that they also interrupt the story. The format being unconventional for an easy reader anyhow, the double-page illustrations (sometimes sans text and with italicized captions) may be handicapping. They can also serve as a valuable (and optional) extension of a flavorful, concretely informative text.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1971
Publisher: Simon & Schuster