EUROPEAN UNION AND U.S. FOREIGN POLICY by F. S. C. Northrop

EUROPEAN UNION AND U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Belgium and West Germany, by joining the European Coal and Steel Community, have surrendered part of their national economics. All six countries have shown a willingness to go even further in giving up their individual powers to a supranation. Four of the six have ratified the European Defense Community, which would place their military forces under joint control; and the proposed Continental European Union would give even more powers to a supranation. The purpose of these measures would be to raise the economy of Central Europe. The United States favors them because they would strengthen Central Europe against Communism. Northrop gives the background and history of all these unions. He is also interested in what is called ""sociological jurisprudence"", that is the living laws, as well as the political laws, of the six countries. He finds that both in religion and general outlook they are well suited to forming a supranation. He has found, too, that the six countries have certain reservations about a supranation, not the least of which is the fear of a re-armed, aggressive Germany. He thinks this fear has been strengthened by the Elas foreign policy. Both the Eisenhower-Dulles and the Truman-Acheson foreign policies have favored a centralized Europe. But, as Northrop points out, Eisenhower's intention of rolling back Communism and his refusal to stand up to his Congress on foreign policy have been far less palatable to Europe than the actions of Truman with his plan of containing Communism. By dictating to Europe according to the needs of the United States, without regard for the needs of Europe, the Republicans have done much to alienate Europe and to delay the formation of the Central European Union. In setting forth the facts of EDC, ESCS, and the Central European Union, Northrop has compiled his history from personal knowledge and study in Europe and has gathered many statistics for his theories of sociological jurisprudence. The facts are incontrovertible; the statistics, cogent. Students of international affairs will have to read this book; the average reader, out to be pleasurably informed, will find himself really at work.

Pub Date: Oct. 5th, 1954
Publisher: Macmillan