THE NOVELIST AND THE PASSION STORY by F. W. Dillistone

THE NOVELIST AND THE PASSION STORY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Students of the novel -- and those who merely have enjoyed the work studied -- will find the evaluations of this book of considerable interest. Though the chapters of The Novelist and the Passion Story could be read independently of each other, they form a varied appreciation of the book's central theme. F. W. Dillistone undertakes an analysis of the success with which four prominent novelists wrote about the Passion of Jesus Christ through the format of a story set in the contemporary world but constructed in the framework of the Passion narrative. Specifically, he takes Francois Mauriac's The Lamb, Herman Melville's Billy Budd, Nikos Kazantzakis' Christ Recrucified (more commonly recognized by the movie title He Who Must Die) and William Faulkner's Fable. It so happens that the writers selected represent the Roman, the Orthodox, the Calvinist and the Protestant traditions. To see what light each writer throws on the meaning of the central redeeming act of the Christian faith as interpreted by F.W. Dillistone will afford readers of this book a new appreciation of these authors. It should also prompt a rereading of the original works for a better understanding of the inner meanings of each which might have been minsed the first time through.

Pub Date: Sept. 27th, 1961
Publisher: Sheed & Ward