CAREERS FOR THE '70'S: SECURITIES by Faye Henle

CAREERS FOR THE '70'S: SECURITIES

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A bullish occupational survey of the securities industry. Henle's glowing career portfolio includes such inflated generalities as the assertions that securities underpin ""the very foundations of our society,"" that the men (and increasingly women) who labor in these paper vineyards shape ""the destiny of our economic system,"" and that there are jobs aplenty (about 75,000 now with 100,000 projected for 1980) despite the automation up-trend. But the job profiles -- the bulk of the book -- strike a reasonable balance between guidance-counselor enthusiasm and realistic advice, e.g., investment banking can be fun as well as lucrative though potential careerists should ""graduate from an Ivy League school and an M.B.A. won't hurt."" And in some instances -- the Chartered Financial Analyst for example -- she provides pertinent statistical data about how many there are, length of training period, general age patterns, etc. The rosy outlook which pervades the book might be questioned, but for the young person interested in traditional greening, be it as analyst or trader or researcher, this will be decidedly helpful.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1972
Publisher: Crowell-Collier