THE WITCH ON THE CORNER by Felice Holman
Kirkus Star

THE WITCH ON THE CORNER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

No street is, or should be, without one--that solitary woman whom everybody recognizes as The Witch. In this story of Miss Pinchon, the witch, Miss Holman provides her best revelation of the magic that exists right around the house. She also presents a perfectly timed, perfect understanding of neighborhood activities and interrelationships: (for example: ""The closeness of Mr. Boo's property to Miss Pinchon's was a real convenience to the neighborhood children, because just walking home from school, for instance, it was possible to taunt the witch a bit and then hide behind a tree and bark at Mr. Boo. The thought that there was still another dog on the place would animate Mr. Boo in such a way that it gave great delight to the children."") Miss Pinchon thought she was just an all around incompetent until she heard from the children that she was a witch--and that made her decide to develop the art. Zigmund Hutchmaier, the loudest promoter of Miss Pinchon taunting, was the one who caught her practicing (unsuccessfully) at flying a broom. He and Jacques and Lucy Geordi do their best to help Miss P. develop her skills, and yes, eventually she does find her special witch niche. Arnold Lobel's black and white drawings add to the magic of this super, natural view of neighborhood rumormongering which comes off as warmly and happily as a successful block party.

Pub Date: Oct. 28th, 1966
Publisher: Norton