A FOREST WORLD by Felix Salten

A FOREST WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The degree of success, in various localities, of the picture, Bambi, may influence the sale and popularity of this new Salten story of creatures of the woods. For A Forest World is actually closer in mood and tempo to Bambi than anything else he has written. Some will like it better, for there is more originality in what might be called ""plot"", and less digressions into philosophy. Once again Salten seems to read into the minds of creatures of the woods, to make them think and speak and act as one feels they do think and speak and act together. He has introduced a new note into his story, as close proximity of a forester's family and their creatures results in some interchange. The nearness of security and care tempts a doe to take her new fawns to the barn for the winter, but spring finds her restless and eager to take them back into their rightful environment. The barnyard creatures, too, are tempted by the forest, but find themselves unwelcome and strange and ill-adapted. And -- on the fringe --there is the hunchbacked boy, and his kindly parents, who know and love the wild creatures and their own animals, and slowly win their love and confidence. The illustrations by Bob Kuhn are keyed to the spirit of the story. It's not another Bambi, but those who liked Bambi will enjoy it. For all ages.

Publisher: Bobbs-Merill