THE SPANIARD AND THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS by Fernando Diaz-Plaja

THE SPANIARD AND THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Nothing that is Spanish is alien to me,"" paraphrases the author of this intimate, knowledgeable treatise on the Spanish character in light of its shortcomings. The Spaniard scores low on Avarice; it does not sit well with his other vices. He is sufficiently gluttonous and slothful. Envy and Anger are points of honor, and Lust is simply a fact of life, ""in the air."" But it is Pride which dictates his actions and reactions in all the segments of his life. It makes him a good host (""Here everyone thinks he is noble"") and a bad listener (only personal definition gives reality to things). It pervades his religion, tailored to suit his individual personality, and the way he deals with cuckoldry--the fear of ridicule, not the jealousy of passion, is at work. He is pleased to pass judgment on a book before reading it. Our pride dictated that we read this book and we now feel informed--Senor Diaz-Plaja has written of the Spaniards as only a Spaniard could and get away with it. The publishers hope to reach the audience of The Italians.

Pub Date: Sept. 18th, 1967
Publisher: Scribners