Fiction & Literature Book Reviews

THE WAKE by Paul Kingsnorth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"One can't fault Kingsnorth for lack of ambition, though his story stumbles under its own linguistic weight. The reader will judge whether it's worth the heafodpanneteung."
Frenchies is ycumen in—lhude sing Shazam! Read full book review >
GIRL WAITS WITH GUN by Amy Stewart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"More adventures involving gutsy Constance, quietly determined Sheriff Heath, and a lively cast of supporting characters would be most welcome."
Better known for her nonfiction (The Drunken Botanist, 2013, etc.), Stewart crafts a solid, absorbing novel based on real-life events—though they're unusual enough to seem invented.Read full book review >

MARVEL AND A WONDER by Joe Meno
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A grandiose, atmospheric portrait of Middle America in all its damaged glory."
The mysterious gift of a snowy white quarter horse upends the rural existence of a family in Indiana. Read full book review >
OUT OF DARKNESS by Ashley Hope Pérez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A powerful, layered tale of forbidden love in times of unrelenting racism. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 14 & up)"
A Mexican-American girl and a black boy begin an ill-fated love in the months leading up to a catastrophic 1937 school explosion in East Texas. Read full book review >
PURITY by Jonathan Franzen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An expansive, brainy, yet inviting novel that leaves few foibles unexplored."
A twisty but controlled epic that merges large and small concerns: loose nukes and absent parents, government surveillance and bad sex, gory murder and fine art. Read full book review >

JIMMY BLUEFEATHER by Kim Heacox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Old Keb understands it 'used to be hard to live and easy to die. Not anymore.'"
Part quest, part rebirth, Heacox's debut novel spins a story of Alaska's Tlingit people and the land, an old man dying, and a young man learning to live. Read full book review >
A CLUE TO THE EXIT by Edward St. Aubyn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Though with plenty of good moments, this ranks as lesser work by an author who's done much better."
If you can see the end coming from a long way off, do you rush toward it or head in the opposite direction? Therein lies a question to be wrestled with—and so St. Aubyn (On the Edge, 2014, etc.) does.Read full book review >
ANNE & HENRY by Dawn Ius
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Clever and compelling storytelling from a promising writer. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn are reimagined as private school hooligans (of course). Read full book review >
MOTHERLOAD by Avery Caswell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An uneven but frequently affecting collection."
A charming collection of short stories populated by an array of characters of various ages and backgrounds, making wildly different mistakes. Read full book review >
IS FAT BOB DEAD YET? by Stephen Dobyns
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Fat Bob is, too. And where did that head go, anyway? A lively, laugh-out-loud winner."
Another darkly comic whodunit from veteran novelist Dobyns (The Burn Palace, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >
THE DRAFTER by Kim Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Disappointing."
Harrison shifts gears with this near-future techno-thriller. Read full book review >
VIENNA by William S. Kirby
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Borrowing loosely from Conan Doyle, with Vienna's Holmes-ian mind and a plot similar to 'The Adventure of the Six Napoleons,' Kirby crafts an entertaining if sometimes-meandering tale."
A chance—or is it?—meeting in a Brussels club leads to a strange love affair between two women as the pair is plunged into a trans-European treasure hunt. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >