Fiction & Literature Book Reviews

THE WORLD TO COME by Jim Shepard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 24, 2017

"A stylist whose fictional expansiveness underscores his singularity."
Shepard's fifth story collection—his first book since his well-received novel, The Book of Aron (2015), which was a Kirkus Prize finalist—demonstrates why he's a writer who defies categorization. Read full book review >
ENCIRCLING by Carl Frode Tiller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A poised and effective Rashomon-style exploration of multiple psyches."
One man's amnesia prompts divergent and sometimes-conflicting remembrances from those close to him. Read full book review >

LAST DAY ON EARTH by Eric Puchner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Without fundamentally challenging the traditional short story structure, the author finds a way to bend it to suit a skewed and fantastic vision of the world."
The nine stories in this collection by Puchner (Model Home, 2010, etc.) range from the domestic to the surreal. Read full book review >
GUNMETAL GRAY by Mark Greaney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"At about 500 pages, this one is fat, fast, and fun. Clancy's spirit lives on."
The latest high-energy entry in the Gray Man series (Back Blast, 2016, etc.). Read full book review >
A CAST OF VULTURES by Judith Flanders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"The highlights of the third in this marvelous and often amusing series (A Bed of Scorpions, 2016, etc.) are neighborhood characters who are a basket of enjoyables and a complex and brainy heroine."
A missing neighbor, a series of fires, and turmoil at work are just the start of Samantha Clair's problems. Read full book review >

DEVIL IN SPRING by Lisa Kleypas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A funny and charming story that will delight readers from the first page to the last."
When two strangers are found alone in a summerhouse during a ball in Victorian London, they're forced into an engagement neither of them wants—at first. Read full book review >
WHEN MORNING COMES by Arushi Raina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"This timely reminder of the power and passion of young people contextualizes current student protests by honoring those of the past. (historical note, glossary, glossary sources) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
In her debut novel, Raina applies the now-familiar "teenage girl takes on the government" trope to the Soweto uprising of June 1976. Read full book review >
LINCOLN IN THE BARDO by George Saunders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"With this book, Saunders asserts a complex and disturbing vision in which society and cosmos blur."
Short-story virtuoso Saunders' (Tenth of December, 2013, etc.) first novel is an exhilarating change of pace. Read full book review >
ISLAND OF EXILES by Erica Cameron
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A fresh, original series starter bolstered by a dynamic protagonist and a welcome sense of depth."
Cameron (Assassins: Nemesis, 2017, etc.) tells a YA fantasy tale about a "nyshin"—a warrior, mage, and hunter—on a desert island rife with danger.Read full book review >
THE DIME by Kathleen Kent
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing. Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman."
Kent (The Outcasts, 2013, etc.) introduces a tough and engaging new detective in this police thriller set in Dallas. Read full book review >
THE YEAR OF THE COMET by Sergei Lebedev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This gorgeously written, unsettling novel—a rare work about the fall of the Soviet Union as told through the eyes of a child—leaves us with a fresh understanding of that towering moment in recent history."
Lebedev follows up Oblivion (2016), his powerful novel about the atrocities of the gulag, with this autobiographical tale of a boy's coming-of-age during the years leading to the fall of the Soviet Union. Read full book review >
THE DARK FLOOD RISES by Margaret Drabble
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"The lack of narrative drive may irk some readers, but those who appreciate her able combination of intelligence, wit, and rue will willingly follow Drabble into the sunset."
From veteran novelist Drabble (The Pure Gold Baby, 2013, etc.), a meditation on modern old age spiked with astringent humor on a subject "too serious for tears." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >