Fiction & Literature Book Reviews

The Burden of Sweetberry by Carol Gosa-Summerville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 2016

"A stirring tale rooted in the language and experience of the Alabama community it depicts."
In this debut historical novel, a Southern African-American enclave struggles with a public tragedy. Read full book review >
Tearing Down The Statues by Brian Bennudriti
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Rococo worldbuilding and sci-fi fantasy for the adventurous reader, relayed in language and description bordering on the experimental."
As an incredible realm sinks deeper and deeper into anarchy and warfare, a strange group of pilgrims embarks on an enigmatic mission. Read full book review >

Catching A Glimpse by Donald Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 2015

"This book's mix of personal text and well-chosen photos will make it a treasure for the author's family."
Davis' slim debut collection contains a range of forms—haiku, lyrics, short stories, and memoir. Read full book review >
Lost Wyoming by Debra Snider
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An ultimately enjoyable and charming book about a young woman who struggles to figure out how to embrace the positive aspects of her life."
A novel examines the complexities of relationships, the challenges of communicating feelings, and the difficulties of discovering what one really wants. Read full book review >
Tiny Tim and The Ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge by Norman Whaler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"A religious sequel to Dickens' holiday classic and an ideal stocking stuffer."
A debut novella and sequel to A Christmas Carol explores the adult life of Tiny Tim.Read full book review >

Comorbid by Lorelei Logsdon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 2016

"A psychological thriller about an enigmatic killer that's both inventive and unflinching."
A man struggles to manage the dark trauma of his youth, and the havoc it continues to wreak on his adulthood. Read full book review >
Sir Coffin Graves (Book 2) by Leinad Platz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 2016

"A highly charged fantasy tale about God-chosen warriors fighting evil forces intent on destruction."
A young man imbued with superpowers must fight to save the world from the man he once thought was his father. Read full book review >
A Faithful Son by Michael Scott Garvin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2016

"A striking tale of coming-of-age, loss, sexuality, and self-discovery, filled with rich characters."
Garvin depicts the splendor and squalor of both the natural and human worlds in this debut literary novel. Read full book review >
Tepid Blue by Dev Bhattacharyya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2016

"A work so surreal that it initially seems absurd, but its sense of mythology, mysticism, and introspection will still give patient readers a sense of the uncanny."
Two long poems on philosophy and yoga, respectively, take meditation and introspection to strange places. Read full book review >
Shadowboxing With Bukowski by Darrell Kastin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2016

"A novel about a life spent surrounded by books, heavily influenced by the grimy realism of a poet's life and work."
A man works to keep his California bookstore afloat while meditating on his relationship with Charles Bukowski. Read full book review >
Flat Earth Theory by Yael Egal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2016

"An intense story of one woman's journey of self-discovery."
In this debut novel, a Brooklyn teacher and mom must find her inner strength after an ugly divorce, despite the growing threat of terrorist attacks against the French school where she works. Read full book review >
White Piano, Black Piano, Brown Piano by Paul Francis Malamud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 2016

"This book's portrayal of childhood exuberance and petulance, vivid characters, and Eddie's ephemeral sense of melancholy should keep readers hooked until the end."
Young Eddie Steinberg, growing up in 1950s Corvallis, Oregon, visits his maternal grandparents in Los Angeles in this child's-eye view of the world of adults. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >