Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1743)

BRIDGET JONES: THE EDGE OF REASON by Helen Fielding
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 2000

"Had enough? We can only hope that British book-buyers have, too, and that we'll be receiving fewer literary care-packages like this one."
A tepid follow-up to the intermittently engaging 1998 bestseller Bridget Jones's Diary, the hottest import from Britain since the Beatles. Read full book review >
PLAN B by Jonathan Tropper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2000

"Reads like a fictionalization of TV's Friends, but more earnest."
A lightweight first novel explores the sea change that turning 30 brings in the lives of a group of Manhattan friends who've known one another since college. Read full book review >

THE VERIFICATIONIST by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2000

"Those who persevere will find themselves, like Tom, seeing matters in a distinctly new way."
Antrim's novels (The Hundred Brothers, 1997, etc.) are so hilariously inventive, so audacious, and so full of a unique blend of ideas and pratfalls that it's hard to find another contemporary writer to compare him to: Pynchon on lithium? Read full book review >
CITY OF GOD by E.L. Doctorow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 2000

"But, like the novel it most resembles (Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five), what it actually dramatizes is its own (failed but fascinating) attempt to organize its own teeming content into fictional form."
An intensely conceived study of the varieties of contemporary religious experience that teases the mind intriguingly while never quite fully becoming the fiction it aspires to be. Read full book review >
EQUAL LOVE by Peter Ho Davies
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 2000

EQUAL LOVEStoriesDavies, Peter Ho Read full book review >

GHOST MOON by Karen Robards
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2000

"Not one of her most exciting efforts, but fans won—t be disappointed."
A grisly romance about stepcousins who become lovers, and a serial killer who murders eight-year-old girls and then stuffs them like moose heads. Read full book review >
LOSING JULIA by Jonathan Hull
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2000

"Pretty stale stuff, but those perfectly pitched nursing-home scenes linger in the memory."
Former Time journalist Hull's first novel paints a generic portrait of young love and trench warfare, framed by a bracingly unsentimental depiction of old age. Read full book review >
THE DOCTOR by Patricia Duncker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2000

"Which is disappointing, because Duncker promises so much more."
From a promising British writer (Monsieur Shoushana's Lemon Trees, 1998), a fictional interpretation of the life of Dr. James Miranda Barry, a medical doctor—who was actually a woman'serving with the British Army in the early 1800s. Read full book review >
GERTRUDE AND CLAUDIUS by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2000

"One of Updike's more intriguing experiments - but not one of his successes. (Book-of-the-Month main selection)"
A risky and ultimately unsatisfying departure from what we've come to think of as Updike's distinctive territory: suburbia and its discontents. Read full book review >
TWO MOONS by Thomas Mallon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2000

"Gore Vidal still does this kind of novel better than anybody, but Two Moons is a pretty fair incursion into his territory."
A sharp-witted young widow's progress through post—Civil War Washington's power-centers dominates this breezy and entertaining historical caper from the popular author of Henry and Clara (1994) and Dewey Defeats Truman (1997). Read full book review >
THE LAST OF THE OFOS by Geary Hobson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 2000

"A compassionate sketch, and deceptively simple quiet study, that manages to put a human face on the sadly logical outcome of a national history of genocide."
paper 0-8165-1959-5 A slender but illuminating debut novel from Cherokee/Chickasaw poet and Oklahoma professor Hobson offers a sympathetic view of a Louisiana man who becomes the last of his kind, with the awful knowledge that no one will ever speak to him in his native tongue again. Read full book review >
MAKE BELIEVE by Joanna Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 2000

"Scott just keeps getting better."
An ingenious dramatization of the turbulent thoughts of a four-year-old boy makes something special of this otherwise somewhat contrived tale of the consequences of an interracial love affair—the fifth novel from the ambitious Scott (The Manikin, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >