Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1743)

ALICE’S TULIPS by Sandra Dallas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A slender tale of surviving without men that haphazardly stitches together the fabric of some women's lives."
From Dallas (The Persian Pickle Club, 1995, etc.), a transparently homespun tale of pioneering women facing tough challenges when their men go off to fight for the Union. Read full book review >
HAVANA HEAT by Carolina Garcia-Aguilera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Miraculously, Lupe (A Miracle in Paradise, 1998, etc.) does manage to tie up most of the loose ends, even though the perilous Cuban expedition seems to take less time than one of those opulent lunches. (Author tour)"
Ever since 1935, the seven medieval tapestries comprising The Hunt for the Unicorn have decorated the walls of the Cloisters in New York. Read full book review >

HEAD by William Tester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"The stories about sexual uncertainty are quite wonderful when Nim is young. But those turning to older males, who should have worked the kinks out of that muscle between their ears, become quickly tedious and unpleasant."
Following his debut (Darling, 1992) about boy-cow love, Tester offers 11 stories exploring the dirty thoughts that bubble inside a young man's head while he's doing everyday things. Read full book review >
WORTHY’S TOWN by Sharon Rolens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A satisfying, authentic, all-American charmer."
An addictively likable first novel, about small-town life during the Depression, offering both lowbrow humor and homespun wisdom. Read full book review >
E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

GRASSHOPPER by Barbara Vine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Even though Vine's characters invariably find waiting such a losing game, her loyal readership may want to wait till next year just this once."
Years after she caused her teenaged lover's accidental death, claustrophobic Clodagh Brown is once again mixed up in deeds that are bound to end fatally—but none too soon—in this intricate, rather febrile exercise in the delayed payoff. Read full book review >
THE WHITE ROAD by Robert DeMaria
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A story overshadowed by attempts to evoke an era, all too often leaving characters shadowy figures on the playing field of history. At times fascinating, at others flat."
A Gatsbyesque story following four Americans from the end of WWII through the late '50s, as they struggle, self-indulgently, with the meaning of life. Read full book review >
MICHAEL by Henry Flesh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Amen."
Flesh's X-rated debut novel, the Lambda Award-winning Massage (1999), told of life at the bottom of Manhattan's gay subculture. Read full book review >
MASTER OF THE CROSSROADS by Madison Smartt Bell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A most impressive fusion of history and fiction, and easily the finest work of this still-young writer's splendid career."
A magnum opus in the making continues with this second in a trilogy (after All Souls' Rising, 1995) portraying the late-18th-century Haitian Revolution. Read full book review >
HOW ALL THIS STARTED by Pete Fromm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Underplotted, and a bit redundant. Otherwise, a powerful and promising debut from a diligent writer who looks like the Far West's answer to Alabama's Larry Brown."
A wistful, moving first novel from the Montana storywriter (Dry Rain, 1997; Blood Knot, 1998, etc.) concentrates with sometimes riveting, sometimes labored intensity on the troubled loving relationship between a brother and sister growing up, and apart from their parents, in a West Texas backwater. Read full book review >
BLOODROOT by Aaron Roy Even
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A flawed but more-than-promising debut."
This scrupulously lyrical first novel, a winner of the AWP/Thomas Dunne Books Award, is based on a real-life incident that occurred in the mid-1930s in rural Virginia. Read full book review >
AGAINST THE FLOOD by Ma Van Khang
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Based in part on a 19th-century Vietnamese epic poem, this harsh tale of conflicting loyalties and officially sanctioned injustice does occasionally descend to preachiness, but the vividness of its characters (especially Hoan) and their sufferings preserves its inherent credibility and drama."
An intense, accusatory 1999 tale—the latest entry in Curbstone's estimable Voices from Viet Nam series—tells of Khiem, a distinguished writer and editor whose unsparingly honest new novel brings down a hailstorm of opprobrium and abuse that makes him an outcast and severely afflicts both Khiem's mistress Hoan (a beautifully realized character) and his termagant (and flagrantly unfaithful) wife. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >