Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1743)

BEULAH HILL by William Heffernan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Nifty stuff, with big hooks from page one."
Interracial thriller by Heffernan, known most recently for his tough-talking newspaper tale Cityside (1999). Read full book review >
POINT OF DREAMS by Melissa Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"If replete with rather fussy detail, the scenario's unusually well developed and intricately plotted: a solidly engrossing entry in this tolerably persuasive series."
Another in the authors' series of gumshoe fantasies (Point of Hopes, 1995) set in a Renaissance world where both magic and astrology work. Read full book review >

STEALING THE AMBASSADOR by Sameer Parekh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Parekh writes prose that sometimes is self-consciously portentous, but, still, he has created an intelligent and moving take on a timely subject."
A promising first novel about the Indian immigration experience deftly avoids the predictable overemphasis on food and culture, and explores instead the universal theme of failed dreams. Read full book review >
LUCCHESI AND THE WHALE by Frank Lentricchia
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

A hybrid of literary comment and fictional creation, this latest from critic, memoirist, and novelist Lentricchia (Johnny Critelli and The Knifemen, 1996) perfectly captures the voice of the critic agonistes: the once-detached scholar no longer hiding, or hiding behind, his judgments and values. Read full book review >
WHAT WE WON’T DO by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"An uneven debut offering an imagination a touch too fond of novelty, a bit too carried away with its own fictive swagger, and a bit too droll in its emotional reticence to capture a reader's enduring interest."
Brock follows his debut novel (The Ordinary White Boy, p. 960) with a prizewinning first collection of 14 stories: a flat if engaging thrum along the themes of loss and despair, in working-class upstate New York, in which mostly male characters find themselves confused in midlife. Read full book review >

THE WHISPERER AND OTHER VOICES by Brian Lumley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Slime far livelier than in the overstuffed Necroscope vampirifics."
Prolific British horror/fantasist Lumley follows up his excruciatingly creepy Fruiting Bodies and Other Fungi (1993) with a second volume of reprints that includes a short novel. Read full book review >
CHINATOWN MISSION by Geraldine Burrows
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Burrows (Miss Sedgewick and the Spy, 2000) offers a highly sanitized version of turn-of-the-century San Francisco, with the plight of sailors, indentured Chinese workers, prostitutes, and the toil of real-life activist Donaldina Cameron playing second fiddle to her heroine's love life."
When Lorna Davidson hikes up her bustle and boards the train west to teach the Domestic Arts to the unfortunate women seeking shelter at the Presbyterian Mission House in San Francisco, she encounters one dashing rogue, Jonathan Blackford, and one bumbling marine-hygiene proselytizer, Abner Leatherwood. Read full book review >
A SPELL OF WINTER by Helen Dunmore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Romantic turmoil, but every square inch done with a sharp exactness of eye, word, and detail that give it the pleasures of a Merchant and Ivory on the page."
British Orange Prize-winning Dunmore (With Your Crooked Heart, 2000, etc.) mixes the spirits of T. Hardy, E. Bronte, and D. H. Lawrence to offer up a country tale of loss, madness, and deep secrecy—all with a vividness that's luscious and unflagging. Read full book review >
THE DISCOVERY OF CHOCOLATE by James Runcie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Quick, simple, ever-amusing historical fun."
British screenwriter Runcie's debut is a Zelig-esque romp taking his sad-sack hero from the early 16th century through the early 20th. Read full book review >
MANGOES AND QUINCE by Carol Field
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Thin romantic silliness mainly, but good descriptions of the old manse in Amsterdam, and of the stuff Miranda cooks there."
Cookbook-author Field debuts in fiction with a novel that stretches hard indeed so that things culinary can provide a metaphor of closure. Read full book review >
AMANDA’S WEDDING by Jenny Colgan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"This kind of import is definitely an acquired taste. (Film rights to Warner Bros.)"
First novel about two Londoners sabotaging the wedding of a social-climbing chum. Read full book review >
HUSH, IT’S A GAME by Patricia Carlon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Like the young heroine of The Unquiet Night (p. 596), whose plot this 1967 tale follows perhaps a bit too closely (though a more obvious model is Charlotte Armstrong's Mischief), Virginia is kept dangling between oblivious rescuers and a determined killer in another tour de force of suspense."
Three years after beating Isobel Tarks, his accomplice in a long series of petty robberies, into a coma for holding out his share of the proceeds, Frank Aldan ends the six-month parole that followed his Australian prison term with only one thought: revenge. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >