Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1743)

NEELY JONES by M. K. Wren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But though Neely has winning ways, helter-skelter plotting hurts her debut."
Good thing Cornelia Jones is a practicing realist; there's not much comfort in white-bread Westport, Oregon, for African-Americans like her. Read full book review >
THE MULTICULTIBOHO SIDESHOW by Alexs D. Pate
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"As with many book-length sermons, though, there are still some piquant and useful exhibits here."
Pate's fourth (Finding Makeba, 1997, etc.) is indeed a multicultural sideshow headlined by a struggling African-American writer who attempts to explain the death of a white, grant-giving benefactor to a cop. Read full book review >

SOMEWHERE IN A DESERT by Dominique Sigaud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Earnest, well intended, conscientious—and half-real at best."
Sigaud's debut (a prize-winner in France) is a self-consciously artful cry against war, but, with its paper-thin people, readers aren—t very likely to find it moving. Read full book review >
SPQR: SATURNALIA by John Maddox  Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But Steven Saylor does ancient Rome better, and Roberts does better with his Gabe Treloar series (Desperate Highways, 1997, etc.)."
In ancient Rome, they celebrated the winter solstice with boozing, brawling, and similar manifestations of indecorous behavior—the Saturnalia. Read full book review >
KEY WEST by Stella Cameron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Cameron keeps the suspense fairly high, but one feels the romance writer spinning and spinning out the scenes after the plot starts moving."
Cameron, who moved from romance paperbacks to romantic-suspense hardcovers with French Quarter (1998), changes her setting from New Orleans to Key West to tell the story of young Sonnie Keith Giacano, a tennis widow married to ever-away star Frank Giacano. Read full book review >

BOXING'S BEST SHORT STORIES by Paul D. Staudohar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Strong themes about men with heart, though none about violinists with a killer hook in the ring."
Muhammad Ali called it "just a job. Read full book review >
DARK EAGLE by John Ensor Harr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But Harr's ambitious debut is an informed, dramatic, and well-woven contribution to a genre that seems to be, and shouldn't be, out of fashion these days."
A wide-ranging historical romance—the first novel by a historian hitherto known for his two books about the Rockefeller family—hearkens back to the American Revolution and the complex figure of Benedict Arnold, renowned among military peers as "the very genius of war" while subsequently reviled as the very apotheosis of treachery and deceit. Read full book review >
YESTERDAY by Fern Michaels
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Strictly for the fans."
Paralyzingly prolific romancer Michaels has her ups and downs, from the total nonsense of Finders Keepers (1998) to the exemplary plotting of Celebration (p. 103), in which a wealthy woman's husband flees with her bank account after a 20-year marriage, only to return years later with a sob story but minus the eight million he ran off with. Read full book review >
THE LOST GLASS PLATES OF WILFRED ENG by Thomas Orton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"An unusual and beguiling debut performance."
An intricately plotted, very interesting first novel that intermittently echoes both Gaddis's The Recognitions and Fowles's The French Lieutenant's Woman while patiently tracing a disgraced artist's arduous path toward some sort of authenticity in his personal life. Read full book review >
BLADES OF GRASS by Lao She
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Lao She's expert translators have also provided a detailed and informative Postscript that convincingly makes the case for including him among China's greatest modern writers."
paper 0-8248-1803-2 Blades Of Grass ($48.00; $18.95 paper; Oct. 1; 320 pp.; 0-8248-1506-8; paper 0-8248-1803-2) An attractive collection of 15 nicely varied stories, set mostly in China in the 1930s, by the pseudonymous master (1899—1966) who was murdered by Mao's Red Guards, then —rehabilitated— in 1978. Read full book review >
SIMON'S FAMILY by Marianne Fredriksson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"At her best (that is, when not gently lecturing the reader), Fredriksson seems almost a Scandinavian R.F. Delderfield: a chronicler of ordinary lives whose judicious mingling of sentimentality and realism makes for absorbing and satisfying reading."
Simon's Family ($24.00; Oct.; 336 pp.; 0-345-43459-5). Read full book review >
AT THE FULL AND CHANGE OF THE MOON by Dionne Brand
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Alice Walker with a Caribbean flavor and believable men: a sort of dream of history."
A poetic, loosely plotted tale beginning with an 1824 slave revolt in Trinidad. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >