Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1743)

ROSEHAVEN by Catherine Coulter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1996

"Standard bawdy fare, Coulter-style, though the violence may offend the growing number of romance readers who are dissatisfied with rape in any form."
To her usual successful mix of romance, humor, and spicy sex talk (think Wife of Bath with a pinch of dominatrix), the author of the Legacy trilogy (The Valentine Legacy, 1995, etc.) adds a rather substantial leavening of Disney-esque animal characters to a story set in 1277 England. Read full book review >
I AM DANGEROUS by Greg Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1996

"Exceptionally strong, confident writing from an author who shows his literary roots while gracefully blending ancient anxieties and modern concerns."
A third collection from Johnson (Distant Friends, 1990, etc.) offers 13 tight, knowing, well-told stories. Read full book review >

SYNTHESIS by Mary Rosenblum
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1996

"Pleasingly crafted work from the author of the paperback The Stone Garden, etc., but with few sharp edges, showing little determination to press ahead into the unknown."
A first collection of nine tales, 199095, all originally published in Asimov's Science Fiction or its predecessor magazine, set against the common near-future backdrop of a hard-driven information society beset by a climatic change that has turned the western US into desert, water being gotten from icebergs towed up from the Antarctic. Read full book review >
NIGHT, AGAIN by Linh Dinh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1996

"An important anthology."
Night, Again ($25.00; paper $12.95; Jul. 15, 1996; 176 pp.; 1- 888363-02-9; paper 1-888363-07-X): A welcome collection of 12 stories by Vietnamese writers who are only recently freed from the yoke of censorship (and in some cases imprisonment). Read full book review >
PALINURO OF MEXICO by Fernando del Paso
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1996

"Demanding, mandarin, occasionally infuriating: the kind of book you're unlikely to finish the same year you begin it, but quite likely to keep dipping into, perhaps over a lifetime."
Palinuro Of Mexico ($14.95 paperback original; Jul. 15, 1996; 557 pp.; 1-56478-095-3): This intimidating Joycean novel, highly acclaimed when originally published (1977) in Spain, then later in its author's native Mexico and throughout Europe, is actually more commonplace-book than fiction: a rhapsodic celebration of the intricacy of the human body and its possibilities, sung (as it were) by del Paso's polymathic protagonist and narrator. Read full book review >

SNOW IN WINTER by Margaret Bacon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1996

"A quiet tale, with considerable muttering about physical and political change, but with pleasant people who generate a mild interest."
A gently hortatory tale set in England's Yorkshire and various suburbs from the '40s to the '70s, dealing with the progress of two cousins, one domestic and home-loving, the other an energetic career woman. Read full book review >
LOVE, SEX, AND MURDER by Sue Cameron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1996

"Entertainment law and the Hollywood power game here fall under the lens of a graphic intelligence that will keep you up like a pot of caffeine."
Stunning improvement over gossip maven Cameron's first novel, Honey Dust (1993), though staying in the same starry venue. Read full book review >
THE DARKENING LEAF by Caroline Stickland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1996

"A surprise-free zone with all the twists and turns of a yardstick, but Philobeth and some of the secondary characters (Philobeth's offbeat father, for example, and the wily Mahala) lend a refreshing, original note."
Once again, British writer Stickland (The Standing Hills, 1986, not reviewed) tackles 19th-century Dorset and spunky heroines—in this cookie-cutter (but reasonably likable) tale of love lost and love regained. Read full book review >
GIBBON'S DECLINE AND FALL by Sheri S. Tepper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1996

"Imagine The Women's Room invaded by Big Brother: A provocative, devastating, enthralling, consciousness-raiser."
In 1959, seven young women at college become such fast friends that they form the Decline and Fall Club, swearing an oath never to ``decline and fall,'' to remain true to their principles and each other, and to meet every year. Read full book review >
A DANGEROUS HAPPINESS by Hazel Hucker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1996

"The standard mix of one part quaint British setting to three parts gushy romance, but Hucker knows her territory and has crafted a quietly charming second novel."
British writer Hucker (Cousin Susannah, 1996) introduces a charismatic stranger into the lives of three women craving a shake- up in the rural English village of Abbotsbridge. Read full book review >
THE GODS OF GOLF by David L. Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1996

"Aimed at the country club set, and very funny."
Two golf-lovers team up for a comic first novel. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 10, 1996

"In short, Hutchings's selection of 16 stories from Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 195495, seems to have hit all the high points she missed last time."
A sequel to Hutchings's Once Upon a Crime (1994) that outclasses the original collection in every respect. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >