Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE BOTTOMS by Joe R. Lansdale
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 19, 2000

"Lansdale, whose claim on East Texas (Freezer Burn, 1999, etc.) remains undisputed, takes dead aim at the stupidity of prejudice and hits the bull's-eye."
Now that he's in his 80s, Harry Crane's memories turn from his rest home in Houston back to his early teens in the '30s in East Texas, where his father, Jacob, was the town barber and constable, his mother was the town beauty, and he and his baby sister Thomasina played in the local woods, the Bottoms, scaring each other silly with tales of the Goat Man who supposedly roamed the area. Read full book review >
MIDNIGHT SUN by Elwood Reid
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 19, 2000

"Worst of all, Reid's dark take on New Age madness ends in moral confusion—and it doesn't seem deliberate or artful, just simply confused. Might be perfect for the big screen after all."
Tough-guy writer Reid (What Salmon Know, 1999, etc.) jacks up his prose with a movie-scenario plot that poorly serves his talent for clean and straight-forward writing. Read full book review >

WHAT SHE SAW IN... by Lucinda Rosenfeld
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2000

"Portrait of the writer as a young drama queen: entertaining enough, but at the same time both a bit much and not much more."
An episodic chronicle about low self-esteem that's intelligent and well observed but mired in a callow attitude devoid of perspective. Read full book review >
PERFECT SILENCE by Jeff Hutton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2000

"Newcomer Hutton writes vividly about war and lovingly about baseball: an occasionally sentimental debut redeemed by passion and obvious sincerity."
Baseball and the Civil War combine compatibly in this eminently likable, at times stirring, debut. Read full book review >
THE SUGAR ISLAND by Ivonne Lamazares
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"Familiar turf with a fresh mix. Echoes of Graham Greene's tropical corruption, Ha Jin's absurd predicaments, and Sandra Cisneros's stylized restraint enrich what is essentially a mother/daughter conflict."
An adolescent girl juggles the personal and the political in a debut that moves from Castro's Cuba to South Florida in the 1960s. Read full book review >

PRIZE STORIES 2000 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"The few historical stories, while a welcome change, seem mostly warm-ups for bigger works; in any case, the 80th edition of this fine series serves its basic function: it's a window into the world of contemporary fiction."
Dark's perfunctory introduction to this year's collection is right about one thing: there are a lot of deaths in the 20 stories selected by judges Michael Cunningham, Pam Houston, and George Saunders. Read full book review >
A HOUSE NAMED BRAZIL by Audrey Schulman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"An enchanting journey through the century, filled with a veritable circus of yarns."
A magical tale from Schulman (Swimming with Jonah, 1999, etc.), combining photographs, family tree graphs, and fanciful storytelling in the multigenerational Mourne family saga. Read full book review >
I LIKE BEING KILLED by Tibor Fischer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"The cheeky titles that seldom mean much are typical of Fischer's attempt to dazzle: the writing here is darker than in his earlier work, and never rises above its easily earned despair."
Not as compulsively clever as his last novel (The Collector Collector, 1997), these seven stories wear their millennial cynicism heavily. Fischer seems to have substituted world-weariness and sarcasm for wit and wordplay. Read full book review >
ROPE BURNS by F.X. Toole
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"Toole won't dazzle anyone with footwork, but there's a core of integrity to his fiction that can rivet a reader, patches of awkwardness notwithstanding. The wallop is in the details."
A debut collection of six stories about the world of boxing, from an insider who finds beauty in its ugliness, sweetness in its savagery. Read full book review >
THE MAP OF LOVE by Ahdaf Soueif
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"Honestly earned echoes of A Passage to India, in an ambitious, gorgeously written near-miss."
The lives of two restless women separated both by a century and from all they love most are explored in replete parallel narratives—in this Booker-nominated third novel from the Egyptian-born British author (In the Eye of the Sun, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
KINGDOM OF THE GRAIL by Judith Tarr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 2000

"Solid, more than a tad stolid: Tarr's historical expertise puts flesh on some rather ordinary fantasy bones."
Tarr's latest fantasy (King and Goddess, 1996, etc.) combines medieval French romances and the historical Charlemagne in a post-Arthurian yarn. Read full book review >
DOUBTING THOMAS by Atle Naess
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 2000

This 1997 novel by a prominent Norwegian author assembles the testimony of nine "witnesses" to explain a scandalous incident in the year 1606: it seems the celebrated (and impulsive) painter killed a man in a duel, then fled from Rome into a prolonged exile. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >