Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

ROUND ROCK by Michelle Huneven
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Long, slow, intelligent, and humane (not to mention filled with high expertise about alcoholism), Huneven's first offers an honest and compelling allure."
Huneven appears on the scene with a California-set and deftly managed melodrama about life, love—and alcoholism. Read full book review >
WRIT IN BLOOD by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Readers hooked on Lestat would do well to investigate Saint- Germain: He's altogether different yet at least as complex and satisfying."
Another outing (Mansions of Darkness, 1996, etc.) for Yarbro's ancient and well-traveled vampire, Ragoczy, the Count Saint- Germain—the ``saint'' component of his name is no coincidence. Read full book review >

YOUR OASIS ON FLAME LAKE by Lorna Landvik
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Still, in all, the perfect light and entertaining summer novel. (Author tour)"
Quirky characters are a dime a dozen, but truly believable, lovable ones are not—a fact that makes Landvik's (Patty Jane's House of Curl, 1995) latest slice of American life a genuine pleasure. Read full book review >
DARK HOMECOMING by Eric Van Lustbader
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Lustbader's intense flow of invention is wonderful to watch: Wild, gory, assured over-the-top entertainment throughout."
Leaving behind the comic-strip leaps and blows of his nimble Ninjas (Floating City, 1994, etc.), Lustbader constructs an entire actioner set in the Miami area. Read full book review >
A CHANGE OF CLIMATE by Hilary Mantel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Intelligent and moving."
Acclaimed British novelist Mantel (An Experiment in Love, 1996, etc.; see below) offers a provocative take on men and women of goodwill side-swiped by unsuspected evil and betrayal in places as far apart as Botswana and England. Read full book review >

THE HUNGER MOON by Suzanne Matson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Charming, but the low-key, bedtime-story tone may send some readers nodding off. (Author tour)"
A single mother finds love and commitment with a little help from her women friends in this winsome, rather bland first novel by a Boston-based poet. Read full book review >
SEASON OF THE SWAN by Evan Maxwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Even die-hard romantics may balk at so contrived and vaguely creepy a plot, or at Kate's being allowed to find love only by jeopardizing her promising musical career."
A few days in a small town turn around a sorrowful violinist's life, in another by-the-numbers tearjerker from Maxwell (All the Winters that Have Been, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
THE CHARACTERS OF LOVE by Susie Boyt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Second-novelist Boyt (The Normal Man, published only in UK) begins by crafting a complex psychological portrait of her protagonist, but then resorts to a serviceable romance plot that veers away from any deep or original exploration of the ways love and obsession can commingle."
In an attempt to plumb the nature of obsessional love, this slim British novel dabbles with psychological motivations but comes up with a pretty simplistic analysis. Read full book review >
SHADOW WOMAN by Thomas Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"The suspense is unrelenting."
Marriage doesn't stop Jane Whitefield (Dance for the Dead, 1996, etc.) from taking on one last hazardous disappearing act for a client whose pursuers just won't give up. Read full book review >
TOUCH AND GO by Eugene Stein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Various and worthwhile, from Lynch-like bits of surrealism to steady-handed realism, Stein's literary fictions will surprise those literary types who may hold his high-powered job against him."
The author of the novel Straitjacket and Tie (1994) displays a greater narrative range, and more stylistic daring, in this first collection of 13 stories. Read full book review >
THE SUPERLATIVE MAN by Herbert Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Intended as a commentary on heroism and hero-worship, this arch narrative lacks the wit (or camp) to transcend its tired generic conventions."
A peculiar first novel that reads like a rejected scenario for a Superman adventure. Read full book review >
PATRIOT FUTURE by Milton Johns
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"A so-so debut, long on agitprop and shoot-'em-up action, short on motive and internal logic."
In 2021, the New Liberty party has transformed America: hunger, homelessness, unemployment, the national debt—all have been banished; income tax, however, is cripplingly high, and political correctness is required by law. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >