Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

JACK KEROUAC IS PREGNANT by Aurelie Sheehan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 1994

"These few flaws aside, we look forward to what this sardonic craftsman will next leave unsaid."
Feminists and bored housewives take note: Sheehan's inaugural volume makes Desperately Seeking Susan seem conservative and predictable. Read full book review >
THE LADY CHAPEL by Candace Robb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 1994

"Robb puts the history back into the historical mystery."
Commanded to investigate the murder of mercer's guildsman Will Crounce by his patron John Thoresby, the Machiavellian Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor of the realm, Owen Archer (Apothecary Rose, 1993) finds intrigue high and low. Read full book review >

THE FOLDING STAR by Alan Hollinghurst
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"As in his debut, Hollinghurst seeks thematic richness by counterpointing lives from different eras, but here his weakness as a storyteller is even more marked. (Author tour)"
Sensibility overwhelms narrative in this story of homoerotic obsession, a second novel from the British Hollinghurst (The Swimming-Pool Library, 1988). Read full book review >
PLUCKING THE APPLE by Elizabeth Palmer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"Though it sometimes feels like a hurried first draft, Palmer's novel has enough attack to make for a consistently lively read."
Sex is easily come by but love proves elusive for the married couples who are members of London's rich, arty set in this thoroughly likable romp from the British Palmer (Scarlet Angel, 1993). ``I don't want the one I've got. Read full book review >
TERMINAL CAFê by Ian McDonald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"World-building SF that's punk, funky, and frightening: a fantastic acid trip to the end of the world."
Los Angeles of the 21st century is a land where death has been eradicated, thanks to nanotechnology, and so life is cheap. Read full book review >

EATING PAVLOVA by D.M. Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1994

"Drivel."
Thomas (Pictures at an Exhibition, 1993, etc.) slips further down the greasy pole toward literary ignominy in this trashy account of Sigmund Freud's final days. Read full book review >
A SMALL SACRIFICE by Ellen Hart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1994

"But if you can look past the flatulent platitudes about life and love, the mystery's not half bad."
Twenty years after their graduation from the University of Minnesota, the half-dozen members of the Shevlin Underground, a theater troupe notorious for their intimacy on- and offstage at school, are invited by imperious Diana Stanwood, the most famous Shevlin alumna, to a reunion at her playhouse in Wisconsin. Read full book review >
BLACK HORNET by James Sallis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1994

"Shadows don't have a psychology, let alone a sociology."
Can one man change the world? Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1994

"Spin-A-Rama,'' Jeremiah Healy's dirty little tale of political chicanery, the one story that could well turn up in an anthology 20 years from now."
Talk about instant classics! Read full book review >
JUST WHO THE HELL IS SHE, ANYWAY? by Marisa Acocella
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1994

She is the contemporary everywoman protagonist of Acocella's comic strip for Mirabella, and this is her graphic and graphical life story. Read full book review >
BRASS RING by Diane Chamberlain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1994

"Nevertheless, ripe storytelling that deserves a prominent place in the beach bag. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
A swell women's page-turner by Chamberlain (Keeper of the Light, 1992, etc.), in which incest survivors overcome their past and proceed through pain, growth, and mystery toward a syrupy happy ending. Read full book review >
GLAMOURPUSS by Christian McLaughlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 1994

"A light, predictable, enjoyable debut—as meaningful as an afternoon of soaps, but much more entertaining."
Your basic boy-meets-boy love story, with a daytime-drama twist. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >