Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE MASK MAKER by Diane Glancy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Like the film Koyaanisqatsi, fearlessly morose about a world out of joint and lives out of balance."
Mixed-blood Cherokee Native American Glancy—a widely talented prizewinner writer-poet-essayist-playwright, holder of the Cherokee Medal of Honor (Pushing the Bear, 1996)—now explores her roots imaginatively through the agency of masks. Read full book review >
IRISH STEW! by Andrew M. Greeley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Flimsily plotted and blarney-clotted, more cute than acute."
Yet another round (the fifth) with those roguish, brogue-ish Coynes (Irish Love, 2001, etc.), who between endless bouts of connubial carnal pleasuring manage to get in a bit of ratiocination. Read full book review >

THE TROUBLE WITH CATHERINE by Andes Hruby
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Seems to be not much of anybody home here, though actual inhabitants may not always be a requirement for the single-girl-in-the-city genre."
A poorly considered betrothal to a loathsome man falls apart in a not-particularly-interesting fashion in this debut from a child model and occasional comic. Read full book review >
HOPING FOR HOPE by Lucy Clare
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Carefully crafted but less-than-plausible debut by British author Clare."
Liddy Claver is 49—and unexpectedly six months pregnant. Read full book review >
GIGANTIC by Marc Nesbitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"A disappointment, especially for a debut writer with such publishing credentials."
A first collection from a young author whose work has appeared in Harper's and the New Yorker, where he was featured as a 2001 Debut Fiction Writer. Read full book review >

THE CONFESSIONS OF MYCROFT HOLMES by Marcel Theroux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Diverting and provocative, nevertheless."
A cunningly concealed family history is laboriously unearthed in Theroux's alternately absorbing and slightly disappointing second novel (after A Stranger in the Earth, 1999). Read full book review >
NUMBER9DREAM by David Mitchell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Booker nominee Mitchell (Ghostwritten, 2000) offers fans of Kafka, Pynchon, and DeLillo state-of-the-art dreams of a Tokyo landscape that could have come straight out of a video game. A demented, maddeningly playful, important book."
A wildly inventive set of variations on an abandoned young Japanese man's Sisyphean search for his father under the aegis of John Lennon and the mystical number nine. Read full book review >
BILLIE’S KISS by Elizabeth Knox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Knox's wild and wooly fictions (Black Oxen, 2001, etc.) aren't for everybody, but if minimalism doesn't satisfy your appetite for narrative, she may just be the writer for you."
New Zealander Knox, an energetic magical-realist with a vibrant comic imagination, scores strongly again with this densely plotted tale of a waiflike shipwreck survivor's bizarre life and loves. Read full book review >
GABRIEL’S EYE by C.W. Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

This hopeless dead-zone of fictional interest spends 350 pages on the astonishing tale of a student falling in love, sleeping with, and then killing himself over, his art teacher. Read full book review >
SUSPICIONS by Elizabeth Engstrom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Wide-ranging stories despite the theme that binds them, but unfortunately also wide-ranging in quality."
Culled from 20 years of writing in a variety of genres including horror, SF, and erotica, the latest collection by Engstrom (Lizard Wine, 1996, etc.) contains 25 stories (all previously published) that, as the author's introduction contends, are linked by the common thread of suspicion. Read full book review >
EXCESSIVE JOY INJURES THE HEART by Elisabeth Harvor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Foolishness: a Harlequin romance written by Andrew Weil."
A New Age first novel by Canadian Harbor, a poet and short-story writer (Let Me Be the One, 1997), about a young woman who becomes obsessed with her reflexologies. Read full book review >
LITTLE BOYS COME FROM THE STARS by Emmanuel Dongala
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"A brilliant, many-colored work, and a stunning companion piece to the rather different The Fire of Origins. Dongala may be the most accomplished novelist from Africa since Chinua Achebe."
The transformation of a "continent of sorcerers and fetish makers" into a modern culture is paralleled by the growth to young manhood of a delightful protagonist: a glorious 1998 novel by the native Congolese author (now American citizen) of The Fire of Origins (2000). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >