Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE END OF MARRIAGE by Nina Vida
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Sympathetic characters vividly detailed, but trapped in action overload."
From veteran Vida (Between Sisters, 1996, etc.), a tale with more twists and turns than Pacific Route One: a scarred man and a woman are brought together by a suicide that looks suspiciously like murder. Read full book review >
HEART OF THE OLD COUNTRY by Tim McLoughlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Carefully crafted, with authentic Brooklyn flavor—but no cheap thrills, alas."
A first novel offering stolid suspense from the land of the wiseguys. Read full book review >

PARTING GIFTS by Charlotte Vale Allen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A bit way-out, but just the ticket if you're in the mood for a good cry."
Another weepy offering from the prolific Allen (Somebody's Baby, 1995, etc.), this one a modern variation on the classic baby-on-the-doorstep melodrama. Read full book review >
TRUE HOPE by Frank Manley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"The discoveries Manley makes in Al about hope and resilience are not only quietly credible, but also give a heat that fires all the characters, no matter how self-interested, with a common humanity and a flash of noble purpose."
Another poignant, psychologically probing tale from one of the brightest new lights of southern fiction: here, Manley borrows the name and mood of his debut novel (The Cockfighter, 1998) but is more concerned with finding the root of optimism in a man battered by death, prison, and betrayal. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A valuable collection, most especially for Civil War aficionados."
Culled from illustrated journals of the period—Harper's Weekly, The Illustrated London News, The Atlantic Monthly, and Putnam's, as well as neglected regional journals—and adorned with steel engravings, this volume collects 31 short stories by writers who experienced the beginning and end of the Civil War and tried to make sense of secession and its aftermath. Read full book review >

BROWN GLASS WINDOWS by Devorah Major
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Major tells it the way it is with a magical-realist twist, but a tendency to replace dialogue with posturing and speeches undermines her story's impact."
Poet and storywriter Major returns, less forcefully, to the extended black family theme of An Open Weave (1995) in her second outing: a tale that conjures up a centuries-old ghost as narrator in detailing the tragic consequences of Vietnam, drugs, racism, and urban renewal in the decline of a once-thriving black community. Read full book review >
THIS COLD COUNTRY by Annabel Davis-Goff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A lovely tale, in an old-fashioned unhurried style, that succeeds in re-creating a strange, lost world."
Third-novelist Davis-Goff (The Dower House, 1998, etc.) offers a leisurely, elegiac portrait of a decaying Anglo-Irish family in County Waterford during the dark days of WWII. Read full book review >
SONGS FROM NOWHERE NEAR THE HEART by Jon Baird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A convincing premise collapses in a farce that celebrates the excess, hedonism, and craven stupidity in a business where music is the last thing anyone cares about."
Coy, smugly assured satire in which Boston rock musicians mismanage their images in order to vie for a fat recording contract. Read full book review >
CONFESSING A MURDER by Nicholas Drayson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"An intelligent, gripping, and vivid adventure: Drayson writes in an exceptionally self-assured tone that perfectly captures the spirit of the 19th century."
A remarkable debut by Australian naturalist Drayson, who offers us a perverse insight into the mind of a Victorian entomologist. Read full book review >
KINGS OF ALBION by Julian Rathbone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"The rambling seems more travelogue than novel, including, as it does, everything from theology to weather reports, and the notion of strangers in a strange land never quite catches fire."
No doubt hoping to extend the extravagant sweep-of-history-on-the-road theme of his previous novel (The Last English King, 1999), but falling short, Rathbone shifts to the Wars of the Roses, and a group of travelers from India who arrive just in time to be in the thick of the intrigue. Read full book review >
INEZ by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"'What was there between them,' Fuentes's narrator asks, 'that thwarted the continuation of what had been and prevented the occurrence of what never was?' If that makes sense to you, you'll probably enjoy Inez."
The power of music, and the passions aroused by the artistic impulse, are given inexplicably murky expression in this very odd, somewhat disappointing latest from Fuentes (The Years with Laura Díaz, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
THE GARDENS OF COVINGTON by Joan Medlicott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Like so many sequels, more an update than a truly new story."
In a sequel to The Ladies of Covington Send Their Love (2000), insights are secondary to incident as the three friends, facing old age in a picturesque rural community, now confront threats to their land, their friendship, and their loved ones. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >