Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE LOST GARDEN by Helen Humphreys
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Images here—the girls' chalk drawings on blackout curtains, the flowers in the secret garden—can be breathtaking, but such abundant literary artifice keeps the reader at bay."
A slight, chiseled story about a lonely horticulturalist who plants a garden for the Women's Land Army during WWII. Read full book review >
PORNO by Irvine Welsh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Flush with bile, bitter humor, drugs, and sex: a fun few hundred pages spent with the worst that humanity has to offer."
The Trainspotting boys are back and not a whit wiser for the decade that's passed. Read full book review >

HOW TO COOK A TART by Nina Killham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Sophisticated, shameful fun: Killham, a former food writer for the Washington Post, knows how to lay a nice table and can offer a rich feast for famished readers."
A sinfully deliciously debut about the travails of a gourmet cook trapped in a fat-phobic world. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A life between two covers: Acker, resolutely political but always entertaining, in spite of herself."
The definitive compendium of Acker's sexed-up word-bombs. Read full book review >
IN THE RIVER SWEET by Patricia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Sentimental, but readable and sincere all the same."
Poet, storywriter, and second-novelist Henley (Hummingbird House, 1999) offers a historical romance that goes back and forth between the contemporary Midwest and 1960s Vietnam. Read full book review >

THE STORY OF LUCY GAULT by William Trevor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Trevor's thirthieth—and one of his best. Though faintly mannered and stiff in the telling, it's a beautiful story of history, grief, and forgiveness."
A moving tale of history gone wrong and tragedy redeemed, by renowned Irish novelist Trevor (The Hill Bachelors, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
THE TEA ROSE by Jennifer Donnelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Bland, despite the gruesome-deaths quotient."
A bright, plucky, and (of course) beautiful Cockney girl escapes poverty and violence in the Whitechapel neighborhood of Victorian-era London to make her fortune in New York City. Read full book review >
TRICKY BUSINESS by Dave Barry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Low humor that will appeal to all those guys who keep America moving slightly off-course and to the women who love them."
The master of American poop 'n' doody-based satire returns to the Miami Crime-a-rama scene of his debut novel (Big Trouble, 1999). Read full book review >
BEST NEW AMERICAN VOICES 2003 by Joyce Carol Oates
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Varied and risky—with the fingerprint of Oates's fetish for the macabre."
Ultraprolific Oates (I'll Take You There, p. 985) perhaps doesn't have enough to do; this time out, she leans toward the experimental with 15 tales selected from writing programs' brightest and best. Read full book review >
DAR ES SALAAM by Tara Kai
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Africa is more than window-dressing here, and the workings of Tatum's mind are wonderfully, if exhaustively, revealed in all their blooming, buzzing confusion."
Short-fiction writer Kai draws on her experiences in Tanzania to debut with an eerily honest story of adolescent obsession that conjures up Nabokov even as it offers a fresh and grounded view of East Africa. Read full book review >
THE GYPSY MAN by Robert Bausch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Bausch (A Hole in the Earth, 2000, etc.) wisely avoids the sensational, the sentimental, the easy effect, but maybe too scrupulously: his tale of lost souls lacks a certain poignancy or poetry that could make it more memorable."
A sober, unadorned tale of backwoods villagers who fear a murderer stalks their young. Read full book review >
EARTH AND ASHES by Atiq Rahimi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A heartfelt lament that might indeed make a superb storyboard for a dramatic film. But it isn't much of a novel."
A fragmentary picture of northern Afghanistan in the wake of the 1979 Russian invasion emerges from this terse debut (really a long story) by an Afghan-born documentary filmmaker now based in Paris. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >