Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE GIRL AT THE LION D'OR by Sebastian Faulks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 15, 1999

"Faulks remains at the peak of his considerable strength."
Faulks's latest may lack the breadth of Birdsong (1996) or Charlotte Gray (1999), his usual deep sensibilities and conjurer's gift for evoking time and place are what matter. Read full book review >
GENERAL SUN, MY BROTHER by Jacques Stephen Alexis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 10, 1999

"Absorbing and deeply satisfying fiction, suggesting that its late author (1922—61), who wrote several other novels, is someone eminently worthy of being rediscovered."
paper 0-8139-1890-1 General Sun, My Brother ($69.50; paper $19.95; Dec. 10; 352 pp.; 0-8139-1889-8; paper 0-8139-1890-1): The first English translation of a famous Haitian novel (written in French and first published in 1955) that details the sufferings of those Haitians who work as sugarcane cutters in the Dominican Republic and endure the infamous 1937 massacre of striking Haitian workers by dictator Trujillo's Soldiers (an event that was also the inspiration for Edwidge Danticat's recent The Farming of Bones). Read full book review >

DEATH RATTLE by Terry C. Johnston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 7, 1999

"Bleak as winter rain, but a wide readership awaits Titus, a character cut from rawhide."
Eighth and possibly final installment in Johnston's Northwest wilderness saga (Ride the Moon Down, 1998, etc.) featuring a now-aged, bone-weary Titus Bass, a mountain man and trapper who will hang onto his old ways under the Big Sky where he's spent his life trapping buffalo and then beaver. Read full book review >
FORTUNE'S ROCKS by Anita Shreve
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 2, 1999

"Olympia leaps out in sharp focus from the first page, but the conscientiously tangled plotting and the muddle it provokes in her show the strain of transplanting a millenial sensibility back a hundred years.($200,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Shreve's seventh novel (Pilot's Wife, 1998, etc.) is a pleasantly atmospheric fin-de-siäcle tale of high-society adultery, in which love ultimately triumphs for a gorgeously written heroine who seems to belong in a different century. Read full book review >
TWO FOR THE LIONS by Lindsey Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 2, 1999

"The overextended plot and glut of characters ensure that this one is only for readers with a passion for the period."
Once again it's fun and games in first-century Rome with onetime informer Marcus Didius Falco (Three Hands in the Fountain, p. 256, etc.), now appointed by Emperor Vespasian as tax auditor for the Census, in partnership with scorned but useful ex-spy Anacrites. Read full book review >

MARTIN RIVAS by Alberto Blest Gana
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Blest Gana is no Balzac; he may, however, be Chile's Howard Fast or Upton Sinclair."
This intermittently tedious but eventually rewarding fiction—the first full-length novel published (in 1862) by its Chilean author, a would-be Balzac—portrays in workmanlike depth the —education— of its eponymous hero as he is born in the impoverished north, raised by a wealthy Santiago family, and matured by his involvement in revolutionary politics. Read full book review >
CEREMONY OF INNOCENCE by Humphrey Hawksley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Veteran journalist and China watcher Hawksley (Dragonstrike, 1999) gets it right in his first try at fictional intrigue: likable heroes, a ferocious villain, and the scariest milieu since the Cold War washed out."
China viewed darkly is the grim backdrop for a disturbing thriller. Read full book review >
THE DROWNING ICECUBE by Jon L. Breen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"The volume as a whole, though, will probably please fans alone."
Though he's published 6 novels and over 80 short stories, Breen is best known as an Edgar-winning reviewer—a reputation this uneven retrospective of 17 tales is unlikely to change. Read full book review >
TWO LOVES by Siân James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Literate, readable, engrossing: James's portrayal of male vice and female vanity has an old-fashioned tempo but is thoroughly modern in its construction—and utterly convincing in its venom."
A rich and witty portrait of a widow enmeshed in the tangles of her late husband's professional and personal legacies, by Welsh novelist James (Storm at Arbeth, 1997). Read full book review >
HOW TO MURDER A MAN by Carlo Gébler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Formulaic and uninspired but, still, with enough atmosphere to satisfy Celtophiles of all stripes—provided they like westerns."
A historical thriller, courtesy of Irish novelist GÇbler (W9 & Other Lives, 1998, etc.), on the travails of a 19th-century land agent who runs afoul of a gang of Irish terrorists. Read full book review >
A MIDNIGHT CAROL by Patricia K. Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"A much better book than another Christmas tale Dickens penned about this time (see The Life of Our Lord, below)."
Poor Charley Dickens! Read full book review >
THE LAST ENGLISH KING by Julian Rathbone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Popping the clutch once too often in shifting between memory, history, and life on the road, but, still, an often haunting evocation of a tumultuous time of glory and grief."
A dark-hued lament for the loss of jolly old England a millennium ago, when psychopath William the Conqueror used a bagful of tricks to best good King Harold, this saga from the wide-ranging Rathbone (Blame Hitler, p. 1076, etc.) has its moments but can't sustain them The story comes out in the halting, painful recollections of Walt, one of Harold's inner circle of advisers and bodyguards who has wandered far from the Battle at Hastings in 1066, where he lost his right hand as well as his king. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >