Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE GREAT FIRE by Shirley Hazzard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"One of the finest novels ever written about war and its aftermath, and well worth the 23-year wait."
Hazzard painstakingly constructs a compact panorama of a world ravaged by war, in her expert fourth novel—and first since the NBCC Award winner, The Transit of Venus (1980). Read full book review >
LIVES OF THE CIRCUS ANIMALS by Christopher Bram
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Slick, smart, and funny."
Straight and gay lives share the stage in a good-natured Broadway valentine refreshingly free of theatrical excess. Read full book review >

FLORIDA by Christine Schutt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Still, despite the weaknesses: a dazzling start for a writer we want to hear from again."
Often brilliantly written if far too brief first novel from Schutt (Nightwork, stories: 2000) about a dotty AWOL mother and her young daughter set adrift among rich relatives in the Midwest Read full book review >
THE GREAT HUSBAND HUNT by Laurie Graham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Old age makes Poppy more reflective but not by much: mostly diverting mind candy."
A frivolously obtuse protagonist, determined to live as she pleases, romps through the 20th century. Read full book review >
ATTACK ON THE REDAN by Garry Douglas Kilworth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Lots of mud and lots of blood. Historical fun for the lads."
Aristocratic sergeant Jack Crossman is in at the end of the siege of Sebastopol as the Crimean War comes to its close, leaving him free to soldier on in India when the series continues. Read full book review >

THE LAST MAN IN BERLIN by Gaylord Dold
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Veteran Dold (Samedi's Knapsack, 2001, etc.) is better at settings than plotting, and his middles have been known to sag. His endings, though, tend to perk things up. This one sizzles."
A good cop battles to stay that way as the Nazis surge and the German republic crumbles. Read full book review >
ANJA THE LIAR by Thomas Moran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Nicely nuanced, with a fine sense of place and time: good wartime fiction, but nothing very special as a romance."
In a story of the fragile peace that followed WWII in Central Europe, Moran (What Harry Saw, 2002, etc.) brings together three survivors who have a great deal to hide. Read full book review >
A KIND OF FLYING by Ron Carlson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Though Carlson often nods, his best tales will endure, and shouldn't be missed."
High entertainment value distinguishes many of the 35 stories here, all distilled from Arizona writer Carlson's first three collections (The Hotel Eden, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
ZERMATT by Frank Schaeffer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"An amiably diverting account of domestic chaos, but nothing more."
The last of a trilogy (Portofino, 1992; Saving Grandma, 1997), this set in 1966, about the mixed-up childhood of Calvin Becker, whose parents were missionaries working to save the Swiss. Read full book review >
LINER NOTES by Emily Franklin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Skippable."
Road trip set to music only the author can hear. Read full book review >
AS COOL AS I AM by Pete Fromm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Not a bad soap opera, some nicely drawn characters and a sharp bitter edge, but rambling: takes much too long to cut to the chase."
Coming-of-age tale by second-novelist Fromm (How All This Started, 2000, etc.), this about the rocky adolescence of a feisty Montana girl with an absent dad and floozy mom. Read full book review >
TRAIN by Pete Dexter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 2003

"Prototypical Dexter, not nearly at his best."
Racial fear and hatred, and a divided culture's predisposition toward violence, irreparably alter several lives in this unsparing melodrama, the fourth novel from NBA-winning Dexter (Paris Trout, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >