Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

SAVING ST. GERM by Carol Muske-Dukes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A sparkling, invigorating story, though the author's obvious preference for brilliant Esme over her doltish colleagues and stammering husband detracts from its effect."
A Los Angeles scientist hits upon a TOE (``Theory of Everything'') at the very moment her family needs her most—in a witty and sophisticated 90's-style drama by the poet and author of Dear Digby (1989). Read full book review >
REFINEMENTS OF LOVE by Sarah Booth Conroy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Serious historical fiction that really satisfies."
A persuasive if controversial interpretation from Washington Post columnist Conroy of the mysterious behavior of Henry Adams after the supposed suicide, in 1885, of his wife. Read full book review >

REJOICE! by Carl Tighe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A first collection of well-tailored, sharp-witted tales—but a bit too dispassionate and formally all-over-the-map to have much cumulative impact."
Herein, 12 stories by a British playwright, many of them nothing if not strange. Read full book review >
STRANGE DEVICES OF THE SUN AND MOON by Lisa Goldstein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Goldstein fails to establish any reason, let alone a compelling one, why these disparate elements should be juxtaposed; and though her prose is of the finest, the upshot is flat, bland, and far from persuasive."
Another offbeat fantasy from the author of Tourists, A Mask for the General, etc. (her American Book Award-winning paperback debut, The Red Magician, will appear as a Tor hardcover in February 1993). Read full book review >
HELLO DOWN THERE by Michael Parker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Much like the hothouse Faulkner of Sanctuary, with the same bitter humor and nihilistic denouement."
Southern writer and first-timer Parker combines a lyrical style with a fully articulated social world—in a tale of love and betrayal, ambivalence and desire, and guilt and addiction. Read full book review >

FELIDAE by Akif Pirináci
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Calling this powerfully imagined parable a cat book is like describing Maus as a comic strip for people who like mice."
Not your ordinary detective story: in this 1989 German first novel of murder, mutilation, and vengeance, the victims, the detective, the killer, and the suspects are all cats. Read full book review >
A CAST OF THOUSANDS by Steve Shagan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Movie fans will find themselves dying to see the film."
Shagan, who has written screenplays (Voyage of the Damned, Save the Tiger) and thrillers (Pillars of Fire, Vendetta, etc.), puts them together in a funny, fast-moving, Hollywood insider novel about a studio stock scam. Read full book review >
AN OCCASIONAL HELL by Randall Silvis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Playwright-novelist Silvis (Excelsior, 1988) settles into the detective genre with unassuming authority and a refreshing lack of condescension."
Goaded beyond endurance by months of knowing about her husband Alex's Saturday-morning dalliance with waitress Jeri Gillen, Elizabeth Catanzaro phones Jeri's rock-singer husband Rodney to tell him where the couple's enjoying themselves—and a few hours later she's facing police inquiries about Alex's murder and Jeri and Rodney's disappearance. Read full book review >
SUTURES by Christopher Sanford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 1993

"Weightless entertainment—though possibly a welcome distraction for this year's initiates in the call room."
A brief, amiable first novel about a medical intern's life that's as entertaining as—and no more elucidating than—a late- night conversation in an after-hours bar. Read full book review >
MYSTERY RIDE by Robert Boswell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 1993

"And because Stephen and Angela are somewhat dull, this becomes one of those novels that's liveliest at its edges, where the minor characters act up a storm."
After moving south of the border for his second novel (The Geography of Desire, 1989), Boswell heads back home to take a leisurely look at a divided American family (the same territory as in Crooked Hearts, 1987). Read full book review >
BROOKLYN BRIDGE by Leslie Kaplan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"Something was lost in translation."
First published in 1987 in France, Kaplan's drifting, pointillistic attempt to evoke four New Yorkers' existential angst may strike American readers as more comic than elucidating with its quasi-meaningful juxtaposition of ghetto blasters with abrupt, inexplicable sexual battles among white people. Read full book review >
THE PRINCE OF DARKNESS by P.C. Doherty
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Overall, though: a neatly reasoned historical possibility, and a fairly decent puzzle to resolve."
Hugh Corbett (The Angel of Death, etc.), the medieval clerk and sometime spy for Edward I of England, is assigned a complex task: to discover who murdered Lady Eleanor in her bedchamber at the abbey and then tried to make it look like suicide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Gabrielle Zevin
March 3, 2015

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over—and see everything anew. “Zevin writes characters who grow and prosper,” our reviewer writes, “in a narrative that is sometimes sentimental, sometimes funny, sometimes true to life and always entertaining.” View video >