Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

BETWEEN HUSBANDS AND FRIENDS by Nancy Thayer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Plot-driven, yes, but there's more than enough compensation in Thayer's insights into the tangled webs woven by friendship. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
From the author of An Act of Love (1997), among others: a clear-eyed look at a friendship between two couples that almost implodes when a child becomes seriously ill and damaging secrets are revealed. Read full book review >
HOUSEHOLD GODS by Judith Tarr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Far stronger—echoes aside—than its plot initially suggests."
Immensely prolific historical romancer Tarr, who recently mythicized Old Europe in Neolithic times (White Mare's Daughter, 1998) and goddess lore in ancient Egypt (The Shepherd Kings, 1999), joins forces with Byzantine scholar Turtledove—a prolific historical (and alternate-historical) novelist plus full-time SF and fantasy writer (Colonization: Second Contact, 1999, etc.)—to take on a time-travel adventure about one Nicole Gunther Perrin. Read full book review >

SPANKING WATSON by Kinky Friedman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Solid gold for fans, and the only Kinky adventure non-fans will ever need."
Since he already shares so many of the hallmarks of that other Sherlock Holmes—drug use, sexual confusion, and his own Village Irregulars—why shouldn't Kinky Friedman, the Sherlock of Vandam Street, have his own Dr. Watson? Read full book review >
SCHRÖDINGER'S BABY by H.R. McGregor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A genuine downer of a story, though too transparent as a mystery, with the quantum connection ultimately revealed as inconsequential."
The normal chaos of college years takes a bizarre twist in this morbid debut laced with quantum theory (the Schrîdinger angle) from McGregor: a vanishing corpse wreaks havoc on a flat full of students in Glasgow, leaving only one to know the whole sad story. Read full book review >
HIDDEN by Stuart M. Kaminsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A fine, varied showcase for a born storyteller."
In his brief Introduction, the prolific Kaminsky (The Dog Who Bit a Policeman, 1998, etc.) maintains that he had fun writing every one of these 16 stories (1965—91), and it shows. Read full book review >

CALDER PRIDE by Janet Dailey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"With 300 million copies of her books in print, would Dailey dare to create her first heartbroken reader?"
Dailey confirms her place as a top megaseller in her fifth roundup with the Calder family on the Triple C Ranch, home of the Calder Cattle Company, which she abandoned some 15 years ago (Calder Born, Calder Bred, etc.). Read full book review >
LESTRADE AND THE RIPPER by M.J. Trow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

Lestrade And The Ripper ($19.95; Sept.; 288 pp.; 0-89526-311-4): As if his hands weren't full enough with the depradations of Whitechapel's gift to history, Inspector Sholto Lestrade (Lestrade and the Deadly Game, p. 1091) has to contend with the unsolved murder in a Brighton hotel of psychic researcher Edmund Gurney—and the investigations of that meddlesome incompetent, Sherlock Holmes. Read full book review >
A STAIRWAY TO PARADISE by Madeleine St. John
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"John manages to dissect modern society with no trace of either sentimentality or bile: a rare treat."
A comedy of manners (and the lack thereof) played out among the lumpenintelligentia of present-day London, by the English novelist (the Booker-nominated The Essence of the Thing, 1998) who seems best placed to inherit Iris Murdoch's laurels. Read full book review >
THE SUMMER OF '39 by Miranda Seymour
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Appealing glimpses of the day's East Coast literary life (watch Edmund Wilson take a whipping), but credibility is strained as the psychology of characters is simplified to fit the tale that needs to be told."
Biographer (Robert Graves, 1995; Ottoline Morrell, 1993) Seymour offers the tale of one Nancy Brewster, whose unstable life is blown out of the water (and into an asylum) by the unscrupulous Isabel March, a character based on the poet Laura Riding. Read full book review >
LOVERS FOR A DAY by Ivan Klíma
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Both are vintage Kl°ma—the only justifications for an otherwise unnecessary volume."
Lovers For A Day ($24.00; Sept.; 240 pp.; 0-8021-1651-5): A disappointing collection of 12 stories, dating from the early "60s through the mid—-90s, from the Czechoslovakian author (The Ultimate Intimacy, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >
THE DESPERATE SEASON by Michael Blaine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A tale that ends with happiness, hard wisdom, and matured strength for those who survive. (Author tour)"
Blaine's first outing is a brutal, emotionally undercooked saga of a schizophrenic inmate who has a grievance against mom and dad, gets a big fast gun and does quick simple harm. Read full book review >
ALL QUIET ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS by Magnus Mills
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Still, this is an original and haunting creation: a vision of Judgment whose very opacity gives it impressive symmetry, comedy, and power."
A journey through Purgatory takes amusing, appropriately elusive form in this mordant second novel by the English author of The Restraint of Beasts (1998). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >