Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

THE VINTAGE BOOK OF WAR FICTION by Sebastian Faulks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"That latter chunk of text alone makes War Fiction a more than worthwhile collection."
There's a lot of good writing in this interestingly conceived anthology, which includes three short stories and thirty-six excerpts from (mostly) novels about "the wars of this century." Read full book review >
WONDERFUL TRICKS by Gregory Spatz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Romances that fizzle and fray, marriages gone bust, and teenagers trying to make sense of love—such are the all-too-human delights of this downbeat debut collection (winner of Mid-List's First Series Award for Short Fiction)."
The loneliness and awkwardness of single parenting—for the adolescent child and the parent—figure prominently in Spatz's earnest, understated collection of ten stories (all previously published), and continue the themes of his first novel, No One But Us (1995). Read full book review >

GORGEOUS LIES by Martha McPhee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Somewhat rambling, but fine work nevertheless: a moving portrait of a foolish, foul-hearted, but impossibly innocent man."
In a continuation of McPhee's Bright Angel Time (1997), the strange and lovely life of a man is recalled by all of the wives, children, and assorted others who have gathered around his deathbed. Read full book review >
RADIO ELVIS by John H. Irsfeld
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Random and fitful."
A debut collection of fifteen tales that may spring from three distinct stages in the life of novelist Irsfeld (Rats Alley, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >
FRANCESCA’S PARTY by Patricia Scanlan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Groundbreaking, no, but compelling enough to hold you till the end."
Hell hath no fury, etc.—in the Irish author's tale about a Dublin housewife's cheating husband. Read full book review >

TOUCH WOOD by Joe Ashby Porter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Smart, hard, and rewarding."
A slim but varied and accomplished third collection from a Pulitzer-nominee (The Kentucky Stories, 1983, not reviewed; Eelgrass, 1977, etc.). Read full book review >
THE LAST GOOD CHANCE by Tom Barbash
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A nice mixture of narrative, history, setting, and character: an amiable story drawn by a sure hand."
A winning debut from quarterly-fiction writer Barbash, this about a young architect who tries to rebuild his crumbling hometown in upstate New York. Read full book review >
ROOFWALKER by Susan Power
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"An interesting perspective on an unfamiliar world. Tales that are well crafted but ultimately rather repetitive."
Twelve pieces, a combination of fiction and nonfiction, describe life among Native Americans who have left the reservations and entered mainstream society. Read full book review >
NEVER SAY STARK NAKED by Marjory Bassett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"The fairy-tale ending and many romantic conventions will be hurdles for some readers, but the heroine's fidelity to her roots gives her a compassion that seems unmistakably genuine."
Returning for her debut to a more genteel, innocent age—when a beautiful working girl could leave Kansas for Manhattan and find fulfillment—the 81-year-old Bassett finds the charms (and the liabilities) of that vintage romantic premise. Read full book review >
BOTTLED SPIDER by John E. Gardner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"The overlong saga inevitably sags here and there, but Suzie's all-out pursuit of a sociopathic villain, a meaningful career, and someone to take her virginity is a delight."
Move over, 007. Read full book review >
LONG TIME GONE by Denis Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Another in columnist-cum-novelist Hamil's skein of mindless, tasteless, overheated potboilers (Fork in the Road, 2000, etc.)."
Inept, ultraviolent thriller about an ex-hippie's search for—what else?—his lost sense of peace, brother. Read full book review >
LEAVING EDEN by Anne D. LeClaire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A well-told coming-of-ager: hardly groundbreaking, but sweet enough to jerk a few tears by end."
Tender story of a girl growing up motherless in small-town Virginia, by the author of, most recently, Entering Normal (2001), etc. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >