Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

DEEPWATER by Pamela Jekel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

"The lackluster narrative—a patchwork of animal vignettes and italicized history that the author didn't manage to weave into the story—never quite comes to life."
The action is often sluggish and nearly always weightless in this transparently plotted, melodramatic novel about the European conquest of the Carolina coastline, from the author of Bayou (1991), Columbia (1986), and Sea Star (1983). Read full book review >
THE STONE DIARIES by Carol Shields
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

Shields (The Republic of Love, The Orange Fish, Swan, plus see above) offers epic material in this century-long story of a woman's life told from many points of view. Read full book review >

ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION by Ricardo Piglia
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

Published in Argentina in 1981 when that country still labored under authoritarian rule, Piglia's ambitious, multivalent novel explores the abrasive relationship between the human imagination and human history. Read full book review >
ISLAND by Charles Abbott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

"A Pinocchio story for grown-ups: mostly affecting, even if its workings do show."
Pseudonymous first novel by a ``prizewinning author of distinguished nonfiction'' who died in 1992: an earnest, absorbing, if occasionally awkward, tale that explores the nature of love and happiness as it traces the descent and recovery of an isolated urban drinker. Read full book review >
A YEAR OF FAVOR by Julia MacDonnell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1994

"A convincing evocation of life in a Central American country- -and a compelling portrait of a gutsy, post-feminist heroine."
Powerful first fiction about an ambitious American journalist, working as a foreign correspondent in a Central American country in the 1980's, who's torn between her passion for truth and her equally intense, if darker, attraction to the head of the new junta. Read full book review >

DARKTOWN STRUTTERS by Wesley Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1994

"An uneven work that would have been more involving if Brown had stuck closer to Jim's point of view and varied the gibe-and- riposte pattern of his dialogue."
The volatile world of 19th-century minstrel shows and one of its finest dancers, the original Jim Crow, are explored by Brown in his second novel (after Tragic Magic, 1978). Read full book review >
WOMEN LIKE US by Erica Abeel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1994

"Tolerable entertainment; the least credible move by Abeel (The Last Romance, 1985) is to see to it that all four messy lives are tidied up nicely by the end."
Ignore the cover copy: The Group it's not. Read full book review >
PLATTE RIVER by Rick Bass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 22, 1994

"Beautifully written and filled with radiant imagery and a powerful sense of the mysteries of nature—human and otherwise."
Three fascinating long stories from a greatly gifted avatar of the outdoors (The Ninemile Wolves, 1992; The Watch, 1989, etc.) Read full book review >
THE BROOKLYN BOOK OF THE DEAD by Michael Stephens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 1994

"In five long chapters of increasing power, Stephens dismantles the American dream."
Poet, playwright, and award-winning essayist Stephens puts the fun in dysfunctional with his second novel about the Irish-American Cooles (Season at Coole, 1972). Read full book review >
JAMES MASON AND THE WALK-IN CLOSET by June Akers Seese
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 1994

"Slender stories that resonate with wisdom and a wry understanding of the familiar angst of middle age for lonely women."
Stories quietly celebrating the insights that middle-aged women, born too early for today's big careers, salvage from the wreckage of their lives. Read full book review >
UNDERSTAND THIS by Jervey Tervalon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 1994

"The story eventually loses its tautness to become another lesson on the evils of drug addiction; still: a fine portrayal of a lost generation denied the luxury of innocence."
Drugs batter a black L.A. neighborhood observed by eight different narrators, ranging from dealers to do-gooders: an often eloquent first novel. Read full book review >
THE BLUESTOCKING by David Delman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 1994

"Only in the conventional offstage flourishes—pages from Catherine's diary, the romance of a journalist with one of Catherine's supporters—does Delman disappoint."
Delman's second foray into the mid-19th century (Ain't Goin' to Glory, 1991) is a period/courtroom hybrid—an Age of Presumed Innocence based on the scandalous 1851 case in which America's foremost tragedian and his wife launched countersuits for divorce, each accusing the other of adultery. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jude Deveraux
author of EVER AFTER
July 1, 2015

New York Times bestselling author Jude Deveraux's eagerly awaited Ever After, the third novel in her blockbuster Nantucket Brides trilogy, continues the saga of the Montgomery-Taggerts, set on an island steeped in beauty and unforgettable romance. Life is anything but perfect for Hallie Hartley, a young physical therapist who has given up nearly everything—even her love life—for her beautiful blonde stepsister, Shelly. Though Shelly's acting career has never taken off, she has certainly perfected the crocodile tears to get what she wants—which all too often means Hallie's boyfriends. When Hallie arrives home early from work one fateful day, she makes two startling discoveries that will turn her life upside down. "This sexy, lighthearted romp brings the series to a satisfying close," our reviewer writes. View video >