Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

A&R by Bill Flanagan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

Debut about the music industry by a writer who's in it and loves it, discords and all. Read full book review >
THE SECRET by Harold Robbins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Sure to work for those sex-starved, homesick, hungry ghosts Robbins now writes for, who can grab only steam, not their cheeks or other parts, when the novel ends with 'a first-class blow job.'"
Following his death in 1997, Robbins's hard-driving, spiritually empty The Predators (1998) turns out not to be his farewell novel. Read full book review >

SUNSET OVER CHOCOLATE MOUNTAINS by Susan Elderkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"While Elderkin's talent and ambition are obvious, her magnificent language sometimes dwarfs the characters and their story."
An impressive if overly self-conscious first novel, rife with imagery and eccentricity. Read full book review >
FEMALE RUINS by Geoff Nicholson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"A fun, fast read with a rich premise that ultimately fails to pay off."
From Nicholson (Flesh Guitar, 1998, etc.), a comic cross-cultural romance mixed with a droll consideration of architectural aesthetics suggests that ruins—human and monumental—can be beautiful. Read full book review >
REDEEMING EVE by Nicole Bokat
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Newcomer Bokat sketches her characters with broad strokes, and though sometimes her pen slips into caricature, predominantly they're finely drawn with humor, sensitivity, and a dash of chutzpah. A fine debut."
A 1990s woman is torn between her family and her career, and fills it with compassion, good humor, and an abundance of angst. Read full book review >

NORMAL GIRL by Molly Jong-Fast
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"The young author's prose displays a reckless energy and clever turns of phrase that bode well for future work, but this first attempt is cartoonish, derivative, and immeasurably too familiar."
The 20-year-old Jong-Fast (daughter of Erica Jong and Jonathan Fast) makes her literary debut with more style than substance in this slim novel about the travails of a privileged, seriously addicted young woman making the scene in New York's kiddy society. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Shannon never does have the life-altering experience or emotional epiphany you'd like, and the dialogue often resembles sitcom banter. Still, Olson has scored a direct hit on her generation's inability to quit the bellyaching and get on with it."
Minnesota-bred Olson debuts with a blistering lampoon of Gen-X angst. Read full book review >
THE BIOGRAPH GIRL by William J. Mann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"For all the camp and melodrama, a finely detailed and satisfyingly complicated mystery, aided in its allure by several characters simultaneously coming to terms with how they came to be who they are."
Skillfully blending facts, fancy, and a vision of the earliest days of moviemaking, the artful Mann (Wisecracker, 1998, etc.) resurrects the first movie star as a hot-ticket 107-year-old discovered in a Catholic nursing home in Buffalo by twin brothers who promptly start fighting over her to further their own agendas. Read full book review >
THE NIGHT BUS by Janice Law
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"A superior performance, inarguably the author's best to date."
We first meet Cath Tolland as an anonymous passenger on the night bus to Florida, traveling in a deep personal fog that eventually lands her in a hospital emergency room. Read full book review >
THE SUNDAY TERTULIA by Lori marie Carlson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Sleep inducing, overall, like windy speechifying after a heavy meal."
An informal gathering (tertulia) once a month brings together a group of women friends who share a meal and conversation. Lots and lots of conversation, it would seem. Read full book review >
ASLEEP by Banana Yoshimoto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Astute, darkly atmospheric, and charged with the uncanny: Yoshimoto's best in quite a while."
Three intense, otherworldly novellas, each about a young woman for whom sleep is not a state of rest but an indication of spiritual malaise: the latest from Japan's ever-popular Yoshimoto (Amrita, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
NAME DROPPING by Jane Heller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"What doesn't strain credulity is entirely predictable."
Heller (Crystal Clear, 1997, etc.) adds a wide miss to a hit-or-miss record with a clichéd and carelessly plotted romantic suspenser about mistaken identities. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >