Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

BONE by Fae Myenne Ng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 14, 1993

"A complicated, sometimes moving, if necessarily inconclusive, story; but the telling—through simple declarative statements and sentence fragments—too often undercuts the implied complexity of emotion."
Ng's spare, unpretentious debut explores turmoil in a Chinese- American family. Read full book review >
PARTING SHOTS by Freda Bright
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Wildly unrealistic feel-good fiction—but therapeutic, perhaps, for some."
A Manhattan divorce lawyer triumphs over her own divorce—in Bright's lively if predictable follow-up to Futures (1983) and Infidelities (1986). Read full book review >

CLOSE COMBAT by W.E.B. Griffin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Good military and political gossip—but little action."
Griffin's WW II saga of the Marines in the Pacific continues (Line of Fire, etc.), now covering the five weeks from October 11 to November 18, 1942. Read full book review >
A SONG FOR ARBONNE by Guy Gavriel Kay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Complex and compelling: one of the most impressive fantasies in a long time."
Kay's latest is very much in the vein of his well-received Tigana (1990): an exhilarating epic fantasy based loosely on medieval history. Read full book review >
FABLES OF THE IRISH INTELLIGENTSIA by Nina Fitzpatrick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"Despite it all, still quintessentially Irish."
Typical prejudices about the Irish slyly skewered to varying effect. Read full book review >

FROM THE HEART OF THE DAY by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"One wonders how much hope the sequels can offer the younger Armstrongs."
The opening installment, first published in England in 1979, of a generational trilogy about the luckless Armstrong family of Georgetown by Guyanese writer Heath. Read full book review >
THE SEA OF LIGHT by Jenifer Levin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"An awkward mix of the profound and the political as Levin's well-defined characters offer tiresomely banal and tendentious comments on life and love—without adding much new to either."
Ambitious new fiction from Levin (Shimoni's Lover, 1987, etc.) degenerates, despite some vivid writing, into a mawkish—and always politically correct—paean to the redemptive power of love, especially women's love. Read full book review >
CRY ME A RIVER by T.R. Pearson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1993

"The genius is not in the tale, but in the telling—generous in spirit, deft in design."
Pearson's latest comedy of bad manners (Gospel Hour, 1991, etc.) confirms his status as a master storyteller. Read full book review >
THE MARAVILLAS DISTRICT by Rosa Chacel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"An easy read not—but well worth the effort."
A first novel in an autobiographical trilogy, by Spanish writer-artist Chacel (b. 1898—), perceptively detailing the rites of passage of two young women artists. Read full book review >
THE HEIRESS BRIDE by Catherine Coulter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 1993

"Silly and cheerful."
Last blast of passion and splashy action in Coulter's "Bride" trilogy (the paperback The Sherbrooke Bride and The Hellion Bride) featuring the good works of a 16th-century ghost (who's picked up a partner) to help out a new bride with her Scots bridegroom, a castle, and assorted nasty beings. Read full book review >
THE IDEA OF HOME by Curtis White
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 1993

"Overall, however, White's reliance on familiar cultural artifacts make much of the book just that—too familiar."
Collage of autobiography and invented history in which White (Heretical Songs, 1981; Metaphysics in the Midwest, 1988; ed., An Illuminated History of the Future, 1989) plays trickster-fashion with the myths of California's tract-home suburbs. Read full book review >
THE BUNGALOW by Lynn Freed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 1993

"Still, Freed fans may not care especially, satisfied enough with the very humane, high-grade novelizing that's here."
Freed here continues the story of Ruth Frank, begun in the excellent Home Ground (1986): Ruth's South African Jewish childhood now behind her, she has married lovelessly and returned from New York on a solo visit to see her parents after her father suffers a heart attack. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >