Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

THE REEVE'S TALE by Margaret Frazer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Greed and self-interest lurk beneath marital agreements knotted to land contracts, reminding God's virgins just who feeds them."
For her hardcover debut, Edgar-nominated Sister Frevisse , previously mentored by her uncle, Geoffrey Chaucer's son, steps outside a cozy 15th-century convent into her toughest performance to date. Read full book review >
MONSTER by Jonathan Kellerman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"And no one else in the cast has substance enough to make a long book seem shorter."
A psychologist hunts the killer of a psychologist when Dr. Alex Delaware returns after a hiatus that perhaps should have extended beyond one book (Billy Straight, 1999). Read full book review >

ANGEL IN THE DARK by Catherine Dain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"But the crystal-clanking, out-of-body experiences, and thought vibrations will tip off even readers whose Ouija board is in the shop."
After her husband Tim is gunned down at an ATM, Mariana Morgan's life falls apart. Read full book review >
IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES by Lia Matera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Now that's irreconcilable."
It's a rare crime story that doesn—t include irreconcilable differences of one sort or another, so the concept behind Matera's collection of 20 new pieces won—t exactly set your heart to pounding. Read full book review >
FELLOW TRAVELERS by James Cook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"The history and private dimensions of Soviet life are artfully arranged, but the whining, ever-ambivalent Victor is too dull and spineless a figure for so central a role."
First-novelist and former Forbes editor Cook plunges into the maelstrom of intrigue that characterized the Soviet Union's early years, showing how a well-connected American family fared in doing business with the Bolsheviks. Read full book review >

MY CENTURY by Gunter Grass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"My Century is one of Grass's most skillfully crafted books and proof positive that the Nobel Prize - passing this year from José Saramago to Günter Grass - once again rests in good hands."
On September 30th, Sweden's Nobel Committee righted what many have long considered an egregious wrong by awarding its 1999 Prize for Literature to Germany's greatest living novelist. Read full book review >
PORTS OF CALL by Amin Maalouf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 1999

"But, overall, both his pacifism and his passivity seem unfortunately generic, and his plight never fully engages our emotions."
Ports Of Call ($24.00; Nov. 30; 197 pp.; 1-86046-446-7): The native Lebanese (now French) author of such exotic fiction as The Rock of Tanios (1994) and The Gardens of Light (p. 177) offers here the winsome (though strangely uninvolving) story of Turkish-Lebanese nobleman Ossyane Ketabdar's renunciation of both his father's revolutionary ardor and Clara, the Jewish woman whom their respective cultures, a world war, and the later (1948) Arab-Israeli War keep apart for many years, before a final bittersweet meeting seals their fates. Read full book review >
CHRONICLE OF THE SEVEN SORROWS by Patrick Chamoiseau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 19, 1999

"Don't be surprised if the accomplished Chamoiseau emerges as one of the new century's leading Nobel prize candidates."
Chronicle Of The Seven Sorrows ($25.00; Nov. 19; 226 pp.; 0-8032-1495-2) The first novel (published in 1986 in France) by the Martiniquean author of Texaco and Solibo Magnificent, among other colorful fiction and autobiography, is a raffish mock epic celebration of his island homeland's energetically mixed (French and Creole) language and culture. Read full book review >
THUNDER CITY by Loren D. Estleman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 1999

"Estleman's final cut on this epic series should be a single chronological, chrome-plated volume of mirror-clear prose."
Fifth in the highly lauded series of Detroit novels that began with 1990's Whiskey River, a marvel of Prohibition-era description, and continued variously with Motown, King of the Corner, and, most recently, Edsel (1995). Read full book review >
HOURS OF GLADNESS by Thomas Fleming
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1999

"A coarse and creaky plot-boiler."
Gutsy, bed-pounding Irish-Americans tangle with the IRA, the Mafia, and a homicidal British spy masquerading as a Catholic priest, in a violent, sex-obsessed tale from prolific historical novelist Fleming (Remember the Morning, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
DELIRIUM OF THE BRAVE by Jr. Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1999

"Cluttered, repetitious, yet ultimately uplifting reaffirmation of southern gentility, fair play, and blind faith. ($100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Old-fashioned multigenerational saga of buried treasure, hidden sin, and the redemptive power of religion and family, set in balmy Savannah. Read full book review >
PARTITA IN VENICE by Curt Leviant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1999

"Messy and ill-conceived, but told with such unaffected sincerity and infectious delight that it becomes a real joy to read."
A madcap adventure abroad about a nice Quaker boy from Dartmouth who falls in love—twice—in Venice, which takes on the air of a perpetual Carnival in novelist Leviant's (The Man Who Thought He Was the Messiah, 1990) magical telling. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >