Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1751)

THE NIGHTSPINNERS by Lucretia Grindle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 2003

"A well-fashioned if unsurprising tale of psychological terror."
British author Grindle debuts in hardcover with this slow-to-ignite, if serviceably suspenseful, tale about twin sisters who grow up in rural Georgia sharing a telepathic kinship and the same besotted serial killer. Read full book review >
TRIPLE TAKE by Yanier Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 2003

"Gritty street talk carefully rendered. But the story? Just plain over the top."
Ex-con gets revenge in a first from Moore, a social worker and former gang member. Read full book review >

THE SONG OF THE KINGS by Barry Unsworth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 2003

"Nevertheless, a distinguished companion to such glorious excursions into the past as Sacred Hunger (1992) and Losing Nelson (1999)."
The world of Homeric epic and Euripidean tragedy is brought sharply to life in British master Unsworth's gorgeously detailed, astute 14th novel. Read full book review >
CRUMBTOWN by Joe Connelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2003

"A mournfully funny ode to the worst in everybody: 'It wasn't a race thing; it wasn't a religion thing; it was a crumb thing.'"
The worst town in the world starts to seem like not such a bad place after all. Read full book review >
BLOODVINE by Aris Janigian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2003

"An honorable failure: Awkwardly told, too long, and much too concerned with the smaller details of farm life—yet a touching and very real story nevertheless."
A California architect debuts with a family saga about an Armenian clan that came to California after the Turkish massacres of 1915. Read full book review >

THE DISCRETE CHARM OF CHARLIE MONK by David Ambrose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2003

"Another all-nighter whose thinly real opening half sets up a dumfounding series of payoffs."
The Great Ambrose returns (Superstition, 1998) for another paranormal thriller that may lack the philosophical darkness of Philip K. Dick but has all of Dick's endless identity inversions and reversals. Read full book review >
STICKLEBACK by John McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2003

"Shallow titillation. What might have been an exposé of the 1990s is instead a forgettable indulgence in them."
An unambitious meander through the life of an entirely drab British office worker, in fourth-novelist McCabe's US debut. Read full book review >
TONGUE TIED by Richard Stevenson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 2003

"No homicides or explicit sex, but rated PG-13 for politically insensitive speech, poop jokes (and actual poop), maimings, amputations, and the licentious and demeaning use of a tattoo gun."
Who does a New York City radio shock-jock well-known for his anti-PC invective call when he becomes the target of a stinky harassing campaign for which a long-moribund gay rights group claims responsibility? Read full book review >
A THIN DIFFERENCE by Frank Turner Hollon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 2003

"In all, a depressing, stereotype-heavy story, though it does move at a good clip."
For over 30 years, Jack Skinner has been a criminal defense lawyer in southern Alabama, but now he's on the skids. Read full book review >
SPQR VII: THE TRIBUNE’S CURSE by John Maddox  Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 2003

"Though the mysteries come late in the story, smart, brisk writing and abundant historical color keep up interest until they arrive."
Caesar's Gallic Wars drag on, but narrator/sleuth Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger (SPQR VI: Nobody Loves a Centurion, 2001, etc.) couldn't care less. Read full book review >
THE COFFEE TRADER by David Liss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 2003

"A vigorous display of the author's mastery of his material, though it lacks the novelty and strong narrative drive of its terrific predecessor."
Second-novelist Liss moves from 18th-century London to the mercantile culture of mid-17th-century Amsterdam. Read full book review >
THE BUZZING by Jim Knipfel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 2003

"Hilarious and genuinely exciting: the kind of story that could restore your faith in journalism—if only it were true."
Uproarious fiction debut by New York Press columnist Knipfel (Quitting the Nairobi Trio, 2000, etc.), in which a semi-deranged newspaperman finds that the world can be even madder than he imagined. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >