Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

BLOODSONG by Jill Neimark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"The early chapters, though, have distinct possibilities as a pillow book."
Kim Beckett, the golden welder who answers New York science reporter Lynn Hershey's personal ad, would be Mr. Right if he weren't a murderer: a premise first-novelist Neimark can't decide whether to play for psychological thrills or the cheaper kind. Read full book review >
THE PEACEABLE KINGDOM by Francine Prose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Prose—a master at maintaining a sense of the homogenized texture of American life while celebrating each individual's peculiar experience within it—works these tales of infidelity, envy, fear, and garden-variety confusion into a bright and memorable melody."
More entertaining, offbeat fiction from a proven master of domestic whimsy—author of eight novels and one other story collection (Women and Children First, 1988). Read full book review >

WATER BOY by Gary Reiswig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Add a lack of focus and a weakness for melodrama, and you have a ho-hum debut."
The promise of a winning high-school football team corrupts the values of a 1950's Oklahoma town—in a first novel by Reiswig. Read full book review >
BLUE MOON by Luanne Rice
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Old Rice, then, with a new recipe—loves and fishes to feed the masses. (First printing of 35,000; First serial to Good Housekeeping)"
A Rhode Island fishing family rides out some rough seas, both emotionally and literally, in Rice's latest (and most crafted-for- popular-success) effort. Read full book review >
MOIRA'S WAY by Susan Sullivan Saiter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Beyond that, much steamy bathos and nobody much to like. (First printing of 40,000)"
A promising premise—tracking a bright girl's rebellion against her pinched, alcoholic South Dakota family—degenerates into a long set-piece populated by stereotypes and suffused with tacky adolescent sex. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Stories that mostly manage to be otherworldly and strange without turning into horror fiction or mere trots."
A first collection of 11 short stories, many with a Rod Serling-like twist, together with an introduction by Spencer (Maybe I'll Call Anna, 199) that laments the present-tense minimalist state of the literary short story. ``The Return of Count Electric'' is about a narrator who searches in his father's house for a death machine, thinking his father is a serial murderer; instead, he discovers that he himself is the murderer and, once he remembers, begins again his career of crime. ``The Wedding Photographer in Crisis'' concerns a Bill Murray kind of guy who forces a groom to go through with the wedding and films the bride topless. Read full book review >
THE QUEEN AND I by Sue Townsend
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Readers on this side of the Atlantic will find it diverting, too—chaotic, silly, with no real harm meant."
A funny, surprisingly sweet satire by the author of The Adrian Mole Diaries (1986). ``I have no money; British Telecom is threatening me with disconnection; my mother thinks she is living in 1953; my husband is starving himself to death; my daughter has embarked on an affair with my carpet fitter; my son is due in court on Thursday; and my dog has fleas....'' That's how Liz Windsor, the former queen of England, describes her current situation. Read full book review >
JANA by David Veronese
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Still, it may provide a few bittersweet hours for nostalgia junkies."
A close-to-the-wind American expatriate gets involved with some drug smugglers even more dubious than he is: an artsy homage to the pulp fiction and films noirs of the Forties. ``I remember nothing,'' the femme fatale tells small-time thief Eddie Verlaine on their first meeting in an Amsterdam bar. ``Nothing. Read full book review >
MONTANA 1948 by Larry Watson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A literary page-turner, morally complex and satisfying in its careful accumulation of detail and in its use of landscape to reveal character."
Watson (In a Dark Time, 1980), winner of the 1993 Milkweed National Fiction Prize, offers a lean, gaunt narrative rich with implication about a 12-year-old boy who witnesses the anguish of his sheriff father, who is forced to arrest his own brother for rape. Read full book review >
STAR FIGHT by Phyllis A. Whitney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But even the best of the pros can lob one into the underbrush—not that Whitney's following will care. (Literary Guild Dual Selection for Fall)"
In this (for Whitney) overly talky and cluttered mystery/suspense novel, set in a scenic area of western North Carolina, a young widow from California sets out to discover the true story of two deaths decades apart. Read full book review >
PRIZED POSSESSIONS by L.R. Wright
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Though she doesn't share Ruth Rendell's command of narrative momentum—events here seem to swim by in agonized slow motion—Wright is fully her equal in psychological studies of compulsion, and this is one of her finest."
Given a week's compassionate leave he doesn't need after his newly widowed mother briskly announces plans to get on with her own life, Sechelt (British Columbia) Mountie Karl Alberg (Fall from Grace, etc.) agrees to take the time to track down Charlie O'Brea—a vanished insurance executive who, he discovers, has been spending a year planning his escape from his marriage to his obsessively devoted wife Emma (``I was her career''). Read full book review >
THE INDIAN CHRONICLES by José Barreiro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A poignant debut about a pivotal moment in history—in which the rich native tradition receives vivid, sympathetic treatment."
Cornell scholar Barreiro's first novel focuses on the early history of Spanish conquest in the Caribbean, as told by a native serving as interpreter and intermediary during those years—a witness to the genocide against his people. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >