Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

NO GREAT MISCHIEF by Alistair MacLeod
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"If all of MacLeod's debut operated at this level of intuition and eloquence, the novel would be a masterpiece. As it stands, it confirms his reputation as one of Canada's most sensitive and stylish writers of fiction."
There are many beautiful moments in this limpid and haunting novel, the first full-length fiction from the Canadian author of two highly praised story collections: The Salt Gift of Blood (1998, not reviewed) and the paperback As Birds Bring Forth the Sun (1996). Read full book review >
TRANS-SISTER RADIO by Chris Bohjalian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Shallow people and a sluggish narrative fail to illuminate a difficult and painful dilemma."
Best-selling Bohjalian (the Oprah-blessed Midwives, 1997, etc.) explores the fluid nature of love, gender, and identity in a graphically detailed story about a transsexual man's medical and psychological journey. Read full book review >

THE DAUGHTERS OF SIMON LAMOREAUX by David Long
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"A solid, quietly satisfying work—perhaps not the stuff of accolades but successful in covering the territory it creates for itself."
O. Henry Award-winning author Long (The Falling Boy, 1997, etc.) delivers a subdued tale of memory and character. Read full book review >
ONLY YESTERDAY by S.Y. Agnon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"One of the finest novels of this century."
Never before available in English, a masterpiece of the picaresque by the Nobel laureate who is arguably the greatest novelist in modern Hebrew. Read full book review >
EATING NAKED by Stephen Dobyns
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Forget the overexplicit morals Dobyns tacks onto so many of these tales (e.g., 'Writing . . . took a jumble of information, arranged the pieces, and turned it into a mystery') and let them work their considerable magic."
Though it's taken a while for veteran poet/novelist Dobyns (Boy in the Water, 1999, etc.) to get around to his first volume of short fiction, the 16 stories here are well worth the wait. Read full book review >

CROW IN STOLEN COLORS by Marcia Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

Widowed Liza Romero, struggling to advertise her waterbound delivery business and her cojones under the demanding conditions of the south Alaska coast, thinks her life can't get any bleaker even before this debut novel has gotten underway. Read full book review >
THE GATE OF FIRE by Thomas Harlan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"No synopsis, alas, but different and worth investigating."
Second installment of Harlan's fantasy (The Shadow of Ararat, 1999) set in an alternate world where magic works and the Roman Empire never fell. Read full book review >
STONEDIAL by George Konrád
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"A grinding, hectoring, occasionally sluggish novel of ideas that demands and, for the most part, repays close attention."
Konrád, a former President of PEN International, is the Hungarian author of such near-classic introverted political fiction as The Case Worker (1974) and The Loser (1982). Read full book review >
LIGHT AT DUSK by Peter Gadol
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Strongly written in language gray as a Paris rainfall, with moral ambiguities heavy as mist."
A lyrically detailed gay suspense novel, with romance and suspense sharing interest equally. Read full book review >
DRESSING UP FOR THE CARNIVAL by Carol Shields
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Celebrating the importance of illusion and accident, Shields's beautifully crafted stories capture her characters' shocked discovery of the gap between imagination and reality—and their ability to find happiness despite this in the 'opening, beckoning, sensuous world.'"
``We cannot live without our illusions,'' muses one of the characters in this exuberant collection, stating a theme that Shields turns to repeatedly in 22 precise, penetrating tales. Read full book review >
KICK IN THE HEAD by Steven Rinehart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"For the most part, although Rinehart is a talented writer, the results here are frustratingly unimpressive, an MFA's idea of what makes short fiction work. The stories don't end, they just stop, as if Rinehart ran out of ink (or ideas)."
A debut collection of a dozen stories, set in the Midwest and focusing on marginal people who always seem to be in motion, searching for some kind of solid connection that will perhaps make them whole. Read full book review >
DIVINE AND HUMAN by Leo Tolstoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Not essential Tolstoy, but in general a welcome English-language addition to one of the world's most remarkable bodies of literary work."
Most of the 16 stories collected herein appear for the first time in English. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >