Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

FIELD NOTES by Barry Lopez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1994

"Haunting, seductive, and sensual."
In this extraordinary collection, the final installment of a trilogy begun with Desert Notes (1976) and River Notes (1979), National Book Award winner Lopez (for Arctic Dreams, 1986) continues to use nature to teach us about ourselves. Read full book review >
THE COLLECTED STORIES OF MAX BRAND by Max Brand
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1994

"Not every story is a winner, but this diverse collection proves that the King of the Pulps could spin almost any kind of tale successfully."
Eighteen short stories from Frederick Faust, who wrote nearly 900 pieces of fiction—most of them pulp westerns—under the name of Max Brand (The Black Signal, 1986, etc.) and 20 other pseudonyms between 1917 and his death in 1944. Read full book review >

THIRTEEN MILES FROM SUNCREST by Donald Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"A sentimental journey that never quite soars."
Tom Sawyer it's not, though wisdom and humor infuse this straightforward first novel about the encroachment of modern inventions on the isolated lives of a North Carolina mountain family more than 80 years ago. Read full book review >
SWEETBITTER by Reginald Gibbons
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"Preachy and long-winded."
An unremarkable forbidden-love story that pursues only superficially the strong situations it sets up. Read full book review >
GALAXY GIRLS: WONDER WOMEN by Anne Whitney Pierce
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"Enough of the sublime to make it worth wading through the so- so."
A grab bag of stories, winner of the 1993 Willa Cather Fiction Prize. Read full book review >

HEAVY WEATHER by Bruce Sterling
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"A cyberpunk winner."
Everybody talks about the weather; but Jane Unger and her band of Storm Troupers hack the weather. Read full book review >
CODA by Thea Astley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"Astley is a marvelous writer and a hilarious, merciless, and poignant truth-teller."
A spare, sharp-boned bird of a novel, whose song is wrenchingly sad yet full of indomitable spirit. Read full book review >
BLIND JUSTICE by Bruce Alexander
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"The final paragraph promises a sequel, perhaps a series."
Sir John Fielding, co-founder with his late half-brother Henry (author of Tom Jones) of the Bow Street Runners, has been dead for 200 years, but he's just now getting his first starring role in a detective story. Read full book review >
BLANCHE AMONG THE TALENTED TENTH by Barbara Neely
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1994

"Even so, tracking down the victims of Faith's treachery makes for a pretty limp mystery that, as in Blanche's debut, takes a back seat to an acerbic portrait of class infighting at its most corrosive."
Segregation is alive and well at Maine's exclusive Amber Cove seaside resort. Read full book review >
PRETTY BOY FLOYD by Larry McMurtry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1994

"A charming, albeit predictable, story that reads like a B-movie."
Pulitzer Prize winner McMurtry (Streets of Laredo, 1993, etc.) forms one half of this writing team that turned a prior collaboration on a film script (for a movie that remains unmade) into a novel. Read full book review >
THE SEX OFFENDER by Matthew Stadler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1994

"Not quite impotent, but less than satisfying."
Despite his insight and lyricism, Stadler (The Dissolution of Nicholas Dee, 1993, etc.) can't keep this overambitious commentary on sex and the state from falling flat. Read full book review >
MUTANT MESSAGE DOWN UNDER by Marlo Morgan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1994

"In any case, it's the old story: An earnest person strides out into the world and returns—a New Age prophet glowing with the wisdom of indigenous cultures—to tell us that we are living life out of balance. (First printing of 250,000; Literary Guild selection; author tour)"
Morgan's originally self-published fictional account of her trek with Aborigines in Australia's outback has already sold over 370,000 copies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >