Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

KINGDOMS by Mary Jane Salk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Full of predictable plot turns, but intelligently written- -indeed, Salk manages to make the Middle East light entertainment."
``All these years, I thought...I assumed you felt the way I did....Maybe I should have communicated with you,'' says Tarik, the anguished hero of this potboiler by the debuting Salk, when he sees the great love of his life after a ten-year separation. Read full book review >
PEERLESS FLATS by Esther Freud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Sensitive, subtly humorous, and evocative of the underside of London life, but without the depth or resolution of a satisfying novel."
Actress/second-novelist Freud (Hideous Kinky, 1992) returns with a limp tale of an acting student enduring poverty, a shattered family life, and postadolescent sexual confusion in a shabby backwater of modern-day London. Read full book review >

MIDNIGHT LEMONADE by Ann Goethe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Typical of the genre in which every mistake is forgiven if an allegedly strong, talented, and sexy woman finally grows up."
A first novel about thirtysomething Katherine, single parent and late bloomer, that breathlessly pushes all the right contemporary buttons—only to reach an uplifting, old-fashioned conclusion. Read full book review >
FROM HUNGER by Gerald Shapiro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Mostly, Shapiro redeems his characters' angst without simplifying their predicaments or simplifying experience."
A promising first collection of nine stories about men full of Weltschmerz and tangled up by affairs of the head; Shapiro's sardonic delivery is leavened by a black humor reminiscent of Bruce Jay Friedman. Read full book review >
PARTICLES AND LUCK by Louis B. Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"An elementary background in theoretical physics, while not required, would be helpful."
A pivotal 24 hours in the life of a yuppie physicist whose neighbor persuades him that their condos are in danger of being seized by a faceless corporation in a bizarre legal action. Read full book review >

ALL KINDS OF LOVE by Carl Reiner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Silly, uptight comedy with a dated Sixties feel."
The sexual philanderings of a well-to-do California family provide a subject for film director Reiner's farcical second novel (belatedly following Enter Laughing, 1958): a heavy-handed comedy whose stereotypical characters and predictable turns would probably have played better on the screen. Read full book review >
SISTER by Jim Lewis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Though we sometimes see through the voice, Lewis manages to limn an original world where the usual family unhappiness is described through the obsessive mind of a quirky, aptly chosen narrator."
A John Fowles-like account of a young vagabond who lives secretly in the basement of a rich man's mansion and becomes involved with the man's two daughters. Read full book review >
REDLINE THE STARS by Andre Norton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Agreeable, well-crafted adventures—the superman slant isn't as tiresome as it sounds in summary—though lacking the salty-dog realism of A. Bertram Chandler's Rim World yarns, and markedly less powerful than C.J. Cherryh's alien-trader Chanur tales."
Norton's four-book series about the trader spaceship Solar Queen ended in 1969 with Postmarked the Stars; this long-range continuation utilizes Norton's concepts and was written mostly by Griffin. Read full book review >
SANDMAN, SLEEP by Herbert Lieberman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The mixture of detection and fantasy—the fantasy greatly predominating—makes this somewhat comparable to Akif Pirináci's recent Felidae, though without the imaginative consistency that made Pirináci's book such a tour de force."
A hundred years from now, the ritual return and sudden death of a mysterious, absent father lead to troubling questions about his life's work, the Humanus research project, that range far beyond whodunit—in this ambitious, sporadically inspired fantasy/mystery, a real departure for crime-pro Lieberman (Shadow Dancers, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
TABOO by Elizabeth Gage
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The psychology is primitive, but Gage (The Master Stroke, etc.) knows her market."
This season's dose of glamour and sin—with powerful results for those who like a double scoop of melodrama with their bedroom scenes. Read full book review >
TURKISH DELIGHTS by David R. Slavitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Slavitt, still gifted, still erratic, carries it off with aplomb- -even when those loose ends either don't get tied up or get explained all too neatly."
The prolific Slavitt (Short Stories Are Not Real Life, etc.) here offers three first-person narratives—one Turkish and ancient, one 19th-century and Venetian, one contemporary—in a tour de force that attempts, only half-successfully, to interlink the stories in various ways. Read full book review >
FIRST NIGHTS by Susan Fromberg Schaeffer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Schaeffer's exquisite writing burrows too deeply inside her two heroines to allow them, or us, the comfort of wholeness."
Richly evocative double portrait of two extraordinary yet finally elusive women, silent-screen star Anna Asta and her Caribbean maid Ivy, who meet only after Anna's retirement from films but spend most of their alternating narratives recounting their earlier lives. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >