Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

IN THE HOUSE OF BLUE LIGHTS by Susan Neville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Altogether, they seem like fragments of an unwritten (and perhaps unwrite-able) novel."
A frustratingly uneven second collection (which nevertheless won this year's Richard Sullivan Prize for Short Fiction) by the author of The Invention of Flight (1984). Read full book review >
JACK MAGGS by Peter Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"His incessant letter-writing, though, used to explain his past to his boy (and to us), proves a cumbersome device."
Returning to the historical territory—19th-century Australia and England—of his Booker-winning Oscar and Lucinda (1988), Carey sets his sights on 1830s London, where an exiled convict has returned to breathe the air of home and to see his beloved son. Read full book review >

WHY THE TREE LOVES THE AX by Jim Lewis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Despite bursts of sharp imagery and startling turns of phrase, Lewis's odd book falls short both as art and mystery."
With his labored, sometimes overwrought style, second-novelist Lewis (Sister, 1993) gussies up a rather ordinary tale of deception and intrigue: a study in identity that never fully explores the unreliability of its strange narrator. Read full book review >
TALES OF THE NIGHT by Peter Høeg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"An accomplished and provocative debut collection from one of the world's least predictable writers."
Heg's only collection of short fiction (originally published in 1990) shows yet another facet of the versatile sensibility responsible for such intriguing previous novels as The History of Danish Dreams (1995) and Smilla's Sense of Snow (1993). Read full book review >
THE FILE ON H. by Ismail Kadare
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Kadare's is a voice unlike any other in contemporary fiction, and this is one of his most unusual and attractive books."
Part political parable, part comic roundelay, this engaging 1981 novel shows a comparatively lighter side of the great Albanian author whose previous English-translated works include The Three-Arched Bridge (1997) and The Pyramid (1996). Read full book review >

LOVING CHLOE by Jo-Ann Mapson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Though predictable in a sexy, country-western ballad way, also as lyrical and memorable as any romantic melody. (Literary Guild selection)"
Tough love and the love of horses go hand and hand in this conventional but fairly skillful sequel to Mapson's well-received novel about mismatched lovers, Hank and Chloe (1993). Read full book review >
NIXONCARVER by Mark Maxwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A marvel of restraint, color, and life."
Newcomer Maxwell takes the preposterous idea of Richard Nixon and Raymond Carver meeting on the California seashore and becoming fast friends. Read full book review >
NEWFANGLED by Debra Monroe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Overburdened with flashbacks, which slow the pace, but a debut that nonetheless raises pertinent questions about the fate of modern-day families, and offers some answers in an agreeably sardonic tone. (Author tour)"
An incisive, if at times overly complex, view of the disintegration of a modern family—in a first novel from the author of two story collections (A Wild, Cold State, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
MERCY ROAD by Dalia Pagani
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A bleak tale that suggests the compelling beauty of a dream, even as it clings to the brink of melodramatic excess."
A rough-hewn Vermont family, after years of accumulated hurt, bursts apart and scatters in this intense, unsparing debut from short-fiction writer Pagani. Read full book review >
LADY MOSES by Lucinda Roy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A disappointing debut."
An overwritten and underpowered debut about a young woman of mixed race who predictably finds strength, wisdom, and compassion after surviving ordeals, major and minor, on three continents. Read full book review >
MURDER ON THE RUN by Adams Round Table
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"An all-star lineup that, sadly, offers no more excitement than the average All-Star game."
Eleven more stories by the self-styled successors to the Algonquin Round Table who seem to defray the costs of their monthly dinners by periodic anthologies (Justice in Manhattan, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
ROBERT BLOCH'S PSYCHOS by Robert Bloch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Nice stuff, but not a story rises above narrative and strives to be as stylish and memorable as Lovecraft, Poppy Z. Brite, or like masters of a fearful eloquence."
Showcase horror anthology: 22 original tales by Stephen King, Charles Grant, Ed Gorman, Richard Christian Matheson, and lesser lights, presented by the Horror Writers' Association. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >