Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

AND ON THE EIGHTH DAY SHE RESTED by J.D. Mason
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Well-intentioned: pulp with a cause."
A Cinderella makeover, a noble cause, and likable people don't quite rescue an amateurish debut. Read full book review >
THE RED BRANCH TALES by Randy Lee Eickhoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Eickhoff's translations are fluid and easy, but this is a rarefied work that will appeal almost solely to scholars and serious Celtophiles."
New translations by veteran Celtic scholar Eickhoff (The Destruction of the Inn, 2001, etc.) of more than 30 early Irish tales and fragments. Read full book review >

THE LIGHTNING CAGE by Alan Wall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Erudite and graceful, but this one somehow loses its point halfway through, running on and on to no apparent end."
From Welsh novelist Wall (The School of Night, 2002, etc.), an odd, meandering account of a wayward seminarian's attempts to uncover the mysteries surrounding a mad 18th-century poet,. Read full book review >
JUST LIKE A RIVER by Muhammad Kamil al-Khatib
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"The story sags under discursive laments about the oppression of women and the tragedies of emigration and alienation, but its subtle creation of an atmosphere of eternally recurring conflict and sorrow explains why this affecting little work is considered a landmark in modern Arabic fiction."
A mosaic portrait of life in Damascus during the early 1980s accretes from the brief character vignettes that compose this terse 1984 novel by a prominent Arab fiction writer and critic. Read full book review >
ANGRY HOUSEWIVES EATING BON BONS by Lorna Landvik
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Overlong trek over familiar ground."
Five friends and three decades, as Landvik (Welcome to the Great Mysterious, 2000, etc.) returns to small-town Minnesota. Read full book review >

JUBILEE KING by Jesse Shepard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Weak stories, artificial people, real horses."
First-timer Shepard writes here about people and horses: far more convincingly so with the horses. Read full book review >
THE YOUNG WAN by Brendan O’Carroll
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Likable, yet a disappointment: an awkward story that seems patched together from spare bits of the previous trilogy."
Prequel to O'Carroll's Agnes Browne trilogy (The Granny, 200, etc.). Read full book review >
FANNY AND SUE by Karen Stolz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Certainly not without its Saturday Evening Post charms, but this one lacks the complexity to bring it alive."
Twins grow up during the Depression in a nostalgic slice of St. Louis life, the second homespun tale from Stolz (World of Pies, 2000). Read full book review >
OVER HIS DEAD BODY by Leslie Glass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"The results are eminently predictable but scabrously funny, although the wall-to-wall romantic resolutions (nearly every character mentioned by name ends up finding a mate) carry less conviction than Cassie's panicky sense of abandonment and her determination to get revenge."
Glass, best known for her April Woo mysteries (Tracking Time, 2000), uses the incapacitating, but not quite fatal, stroke of an unfaithful husband as the wellspring for a romantic comedy in basic black. Read full book review >
FASHIONISTAS by Lynn Messina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"A few funny lines, but the dispirited tone sinks it fast."
Debut by freelance copyeditor Messina, a magazine-world insider (InStyle, Metropoilitan Home, etc.). Read full book review >
SOMERSAULT by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Oe (Rouse Up, O Young Men of the New Age, 2002, etc.) is a deeply flawed great writer, and Somersault, alas, is not one of his triumphs."
An intriguing but enormously overinflated 1999 novel, Oe's first original fiction since receiving a 1994 Nobel Prize, concerns an austere, embattled, and eventually self-destructive religious cult. Read full book review >
THE MAN I SHOULD HAVE MARRIED by Pamela Redmond Satran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Thin and thinly written tale of second chances."
The travails of a newly single mother. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >