Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

LI'L MAMA'S RULES by Sheneska Jackson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"The story would have been more convincing, though, if Jackson had resisted the temptation to preach. (Author tour)"
Jackson's second (after Caught Up in the Rapture, 1996) again explores the intricacies of dating and relationships in the '90s, predominately among middle-class African Americans, with some wry- -and eminently universal—observations on the battle between the sexes (``It's all in the mind, not the behind''). Read full book review >
WHITE CROSSES by Larry Watson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Powerful in its evocation of awkward rural lives lunging for any sort of consummation, even if the result is destruction, this frequently haunting portrait of a doomed man is an unlikely but compelling blend of Appointment in Samarra and A River Runs Through It. (Author tour)"
The coverup of a scandal by a well-intentioned Montana sheriff and its devastating consequences lie at the heart of this sequel to the well-received Montana 1948 (1993). Read full book review >

SUMMER OF BETRAYAL by Hong Ying
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"But the novel is clogged with highly charged melodramatic language (as translated), and the tedious amorality and apostrophizing of the bohemian culture Lin Ying moves through can make you feel as if you're reading Jack Kerouac's The Subterraneans in Chinese."
Summer Of Betrayal ($21.00; Jun. 1997; 208 pp.; 0-374-27175-5): First published in Taiwan in 1992, this impassioned novel describes the emotional life of a young woman poet in the wake of the 1989 massacre of dissident students in Tiananmen Square. Read full book review >
ACID CASUALS by Nicholas Blincoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

Fresh from her latest sex-change operation in Brazil—she's coming down the last mile now—Estela Santos is sent back to her old stomping grounds by her drug-trade boss to assassinate Manchester businessman/crime lord John Burgess. Read full book review >
THE EAGLE AND THE SWORD by A.A. Attanasio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"The backdrop is original if nothing else; otherwise, flavorsome if eccentric, the story offers many charms despite the present-tense narrative."
Sequel to The Dragon and the Unicorn (1996), Attanasio's outlandish justification for an unconventional new version of the Camelot story. Read full book review >

UP ISLAND by Anne Rivers Siddons
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Far-fetched but oddly compelling, this beaten-down housewife's journey to self-reliance and happiness has surprising quirks, lively characters, and actual feeling. (First printing of 250,000; Literary Guild selection; $200,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Siddons has her formula down to a science (Fault Lines, 1995, etc.), as this latest once again demonstrates. Read full book review >
BLIND PURSUIT by Matthew F. Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Nothing much that's original and certainly no surprises; just relentless, lean-and-mean page-turner plotting and a grimly satisfying ending."
Nail-bitingly suspenseful police procedural about the kidnapping of a successful businessman's daughter. Read full book review >
SOMETHING BORROWED by Alexandra Marshall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Wry, observant, and often amusing, but in need of more flesh on its bones."
Marshall's mature wit and sophisticated style are in evidence once again (as in Tender Offer, 1981, etc.), but a thin plot involving former spouses who fall back in love offers too little support for her philosophical musings. Read full book review >
DOGLAND by Will Shetterly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Compelling, absorbing, hard-edged work, lit by glimpses of another, more fantastic reality: reminiscent of top-notch Orson Scott Card, child-centered but tackling adult themes fearlessly and with great charm."
Shetterly makes the transition from young adult (Elsewhere, 1991, etc.) to adult fantasy with assurance and aplomb. Read full book review >
THE NIGHT REMEMBERS by Kathleen Eagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Eagle's knowledge of Sioux folklore and her descriptions of Minneapolis's underworld add a little zip to what is otherwise a standard-issue, relentlessly uplifting romance. (First printing of 40,000)"
Three wounded, troubled people seek self-understanding and human connection in a city beset by social problems. Read full book review >
ABOUT YVONNE by Donna Masini
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"A potentially interesting short story overinflated."
This debut by a prizewinning poet is a latecomer to bad-girl fiction, with all its candid sex-talk, and also furthers that most contemporary of tropes—the novel as extended whine. Read full book review >
A BOOK OF MEMORIES by Péter Nádas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"One of the major contemporary European novels."
An imposing novel of ideas closely related in spirit to the great fictional syntheses of Hermann Broch and Robert Musil, as well as to the autobiographical masterpiece that is its specific inspiration: Proust's Remembrance of Things Past. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >