Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

DELIRIUM OF THE BRAVE by Jr. Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 1999

"Cluttered, repetitious, yet ultimately uplifting reaffirmation of southern gentility, fair play, and blind faith. ($100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Old-fashioned multigenerational saga of buried treasure, hidden sin, and the redemptive power of religion and family, set in balmy Savannah. Read full book review >
PARTITA IN VENICE by Curt Leviant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1999

"Messy and ill-conceived, but told with such unaffected sincerity and infectious delight that it becomes a real joy to read."
A madcap adventure abroad about a nice Quaker boy from Dartmouth who falls in love—twice—in Venice, which takes on the air of a perpetual Carnival in novelist Leviant's (The Man Who Thought He Was the Messiah, 1990) magical telling. Read full book review >

SPIRIT MACHINES by Robert Crawford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1999

"Wait for the inevitable selected poems."
Young Scottish author Crawford holds the pleasantly rakish opinion that modern poetry begins with a hoax: namely, the bombastic but engrossing fragments of Ossian, invented in 1765 by another Scottish poet, James McPherson. Read full book review >
HALEY, TEXAS 1959 by Donley Watt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1999

"Watt is a capable stylist, but he needs a subject."
Two deeply disappointing, pallid novellas, identified as fictionalized autobiography, by the author of the story collection Can You Get There from Here? (1994). Read full book review >
CHRISTMAS POEMS by John Hollander
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 13, 1999

"As with any bright scatter beneath the tree, this one has its disappointments and redundancies, but the spirit of the collection is generous and has a delightful quality of surprise."
An anthology of Christmas poetry, from Milton to Schnackenberg, that gives an appealing twinkle to many familiar ornaments by hanging them with a tasteful selection of contemporary pieces and older, often neglected works that deserve the fresh polish they receive here. Read full book review >

MIRACLE by Connie Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1999

"Put this at the top of your Must Buy holiday shopping list."
The witty author of the splendid, multi-award—winning Doomsday Book (1992) and its quasi sequel, To Say Nothing of the Dog (1997), here collects a sheaf of six yuletide tales she's published annually in Asimov's magazine, plus two previously unpublished stories. Read full book review >
BROKEN WINGS by John Douglas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1999

"Even so, Douglas and Olshaker keep the pages burning. (Author tour)"
Douglas, the FBI's famous Mindhunter of Thomas Harris's novels, has collaborated with Olshaker on four previous nonfiction books about profiling serial killers and other baddies (The Anatomy of a Motive: The FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Explores the Key to Understanding and Catching Violent Criminals, p. 770, etc.). Read full book review >
HIGH TIDE by Jude Deveraux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1999

"Should float to the top like a bar of soap in a hot tub."
The latest from megaseller Deveraux (Rembrance, 1994) hits on a cleanly written meet-cute opening sure to hook her readers for the distance. Read full book review >
THE MENTOR by Sebastian Stuart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1999

"As Charles's own beloved mentor, a saintly writing teacher retired from Dartmouth, tells him: Too commercial. (Book-of-the-Month Club alternate)"
Stuart's high-rent, low-plausibility debut thriller pits three New York sharpies against one another to see who can be most ruthless. Read full book review >
RHAPSODY by Judith Gould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 8, 1999

"Even with the dropping of some upscale labels you won—t find in Jackie Collins, a fairly lackluster kitchen-sinker."
Once again, Gould (Till the End of Time, 1998, etc.) brokers soapy transactions among the very rich and gorgeous. Read full book review >
THE VOYAGE by Philip Caputo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 8, 1999

"The novel isn't especially shapely, but it's been scrupulously researched, strongly imagined, and painstakingly hammered together: those who plunge headlong into its dark waters will not soon forget the experience. (First printing of 40,000; Book-of-the-Month alternate selection)"
Comparisons with Melville and Conrad will occur to readers of this pungent tale of perilous maritime adventure—a notable departure for the author of Exiles (1997), etc. But the story is also about family unhappiness, its closest analogues (as the last line implicitly acknowledges) to be found in Faulkner's brooding studies of overweening ambition, pride, miscegenation, and madness. Read full book review >
SOLDIER IN PARADISE by John Mort
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1999

"Intelligent, sensitive, and unflaggingly honest: a novel deserving of its place among the chronicles not only of that war but of its era."
A never exaggerated and always engaging first novel that explores the whole of a Vietnam GI's life, by Kirkus contributor and former Booklist editor Mort (the collections Tanks, 1987;The Walnut King, 1990, not reviewed). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >