Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

JAMESLAND by Michelle Huneven
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"Still, Jamesland meanders agreeably, and gets better as it goes along. Another charmer from a gifted and very likable writer."
Interpreting the past and managing the future absorb the energies of four unconventional souls in this amiably loose-jointed second from Huneven (Round Rock, 1997). Read full book review >
WILLENBROCK by Christoph Hein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"Interesting glimpse of daily life behind the ruins of the Iron Curtain, though a bit ponderous and overheated in the end."
A law-abiding Berliner is pushed over the edge by the Russian punks who have taken over his town in this German Dirty Harry by Hein (The Tango Player, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

MY COLD WAR by Tom Piazza
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"Intelligent, sharply observed, often very funny—the portraits of various trendy academics are a scream—but never gets beyond generic Baby Boomer angst."
Michener Award-winning storywriter author Piazza (Blues and Trouble, 1996) delineates a historian's midlife crisis in his first novel, recipient of the Faulkner Society Medal. Read full book review >
THE RED HAT CLUB by Haywood Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"Much livelier than Smith's first (Queen Bee of Mimosa Branch, 2001). Great title and fabulous cover art will have readers reaching for it."
Rowdy southern feminist fantasy for women of a certain age. Read full book review >
THE FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE by Jonathan Lethem
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"Play that funky music, white boy."
Abandoning the inspired and nimble high-concept genre alchemy of his previous novels, Jonathan Lethem follows up his award-winning Tour(ette's)-de-force, Motherless Brooklyn (1999), with a big, personal, sometimes breathtaking, and sometimes disappointing book about music, class, race, authenticity, Brooklyn, and America. Read full book review >

SIXTY-SIX by Barry Levinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"The Baltimore that Levinson evoked so warmly on film eludes him on paper."
High-school buddies move into the tough world of the late '60s in a weakly plotted debut. Read full book review >
THE NAMESAKE by Jhumpa Lahiri
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2003

"A disappointingly bland follow-up to a stellar story collection."
A first novel from Pulitzer-winner Lahiri (stories: Interpreter of Maladies, 1999) focuses on the divide between Indian immigrants and their Americanized children. Read full book review >
MY PARIS by Gail Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Learned, pretentious, politically correct, navel-gazing, tedious, wholly uninteresting fiction."
Ending its moratorium on new fiction, Dalkey seems to have made this selection on the basis of obligations from exhausted literary lore rather than anything of a new or living interest. Read full book review >
HEAVENLY DAYS by James Wilcox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Tula Springs is always worth a visit, but this is minor Wilcox."
The gently mad inhabitants of fictional Tula Springs are doing what they do best—minding one another's business—in the sly Louisiana author's amiable eighth outing. Read full book review >
THE FIEND IN HUMAN by John MacLachlan Gray
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Smart, but echoing too familiarly."
Canadian composer, performer, and now first-novelist MacLachlan attempts a penetrating look at man's vile desires in a same-old serial killer tale, transported in time to 1852. Read full book review >
THE BEEKEEPER’S PUPIL by Sara George
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Thoughtful, beautifully written, and wonderfully tender toward its appealing characters: another impressive achievement for George."
The author of The Journal of Mrs. Pepys (1999) again offers a vividly wrought fictional memoir by the unsung amanuensis of a real-life figure. Read full book review >
SHE IS ME by Cathleen Schine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Capable but bland."
Three generations of a close-knit family—mother, daughter, and granddaughter, each supporting the other selflessly but nevertheless facing her greatest challenge alone. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >