Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

CATSKILL by John R. Hayes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 2001

"A debut of rare accomplishment."
Three young men, self-appointed vigilantes, fire at an isolated farmhouse intending not to kill the inhabitants but to "scarify" them. Read full book review >
SAD BASTARD by Hugo Hamilton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 2001

"It's the quirks of character, though, that prove most memorable."
Lovers of rogue cop Pat Coyne's antics in the streets and pubs of a changing Dublin, amply supplied in Headbangers (p. 438), will find added amusements here as Coyne struggles against himself and a big-toothed murderer to protect his family. Read full book review >

ERASURE by Percival Everett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 2001

"More genuine and tender than much of Everett's previous work, but no less impressive intellectually: a high point in an already substantial literary career."
Desperation outstrips the satire in Everett's latest exercise in narrative wizardry (Glyph, 1999, etc.), as a lonely African-American writer faces private torment and instant fame when his parody of ghetto literature is taken as the real deal. Read full book review >
AN AFFAIR OF HONOR by Richard Marius
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"That Marius (After the War, 1992, etc.), who died in 1999, could create a vivid cast of characters is made clear once again. But this is a book chock-a-block with characters, the vivid and the prosaic getting virtually equal treatment."
Published posthumously, Marius's last is a brilliant though overcrowded story about a young southerner's violent coming-of-age. Read full book review >
THE HEIGHT AND DEPTH OF EVERYTHING by Katharine Haake
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"Bold and experimental, though not always perfectly enjoyable."
Original and accomplished, if at times unsatisfying, Haake's second collection (after No Reason on Earth, 1986) seeks to break the boundary between story and storyteller. Read full book review >

UNDER SATAN’S SUN by Georges Bernanos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"Not all readers will agree, but Under Satan's Sun should not be missed."
First published in 1926 and long unavailable in English translation, this vivid debut novel by the eminent French Catholic author (1888-1948) is a solid stepping-stone pointing toward the greater achievements of Bernanos's Diary of a Country Priest and The Impostor. Read full book review >
THE WOLF PIT by Marly Youmans
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"Thoughtful work, but Youmans's restrained, polished, and admirably unsentimental prose distances her characters from readers yearning to be moved."
A slave girl and a young Confederate soldier experience pain and loss, in an elegantly written Civil War novel by the author of Catherwood (1996). Read full book review >
THE EVIDENCE AGAINST HER by Robb Forman Dew
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 19, 2001

"Although Dew's stately pace requires patience, particularly at first, the fictional world she creates becomes irresistible and hard to leave by book's end."
From American Book Award winner Dew (Dale Loves Sophie to Death, 1981; a memoir, The Family Heart, 1994, etc.) comes a leisurely, deceptively formal, quietly ambitious exploration of love in turn-of-the-century Ohio. Read full book review >
SACRED GROUND by Barbara Wood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2001

"Good medicine for the thirsty of spirit."
Prolific pop novelist Wood (Perfect Harmony, 1998, etc.) portrays a heroine with a thousand faces—in a saga about California's women from 2000 years ago to the present. Read full book review >
LOOK AT ME by Jennifer Egan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2001

"A surprisingly satisfying stew of philosophy, social commentary, and storytelling."
In her sprawling, ambitious second novel, Egan (The Invisible Circus, 1995) questions the shift in America's cultural underpinnings from industry to information, using as dual settings the hip fashion world of Manhattan and the nation's demographic and geographic middle, represented by Rockford, Illinois. Read full book review >
LETTERS FROM AN AGE OF REASON by Nora Hague
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2001

"Overwrought and overlong."
Doorstopper of a first novel about a young 19th-century American woman who wants to live like a 20th-century free spirit. Read full book review >
SWIFT AS DESIRE by Laura Esquivel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2001

"An imaginative, lyrical fictional memoir, it seems, of the author's own father. (Interesting note: Gabriel García Márquez's father was also a telegraph operator, although the short piece he did recently was much less moony than Esquivel's.)"
A tender and thoughtful, if at times rather stilted, tale of a Mexican telegraph operator, by the megaselling author best known for her debut novel, Like Water for Chocolate (1992). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >