Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

SEAWARD by Brad Leithauser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 1993

"An honest failure by a true master: had Leithauser only tightened (and shortened) the plot he could have hit the mark, but he dawdles his way through and loses his chance."
Leithauser (Equal Distance, 1984; Hence, 1988) peers uncertainly into the more remote corners of the middle-class soul- -in this sadly prosaic account of grief and desire. Read full book review >
STOLEN THUNDER by David Axton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"American— gives himself far too many pages to reach an outcome that will surprise no one."
A Cornish gentlewoman, her widowed, American father-in-law, a terminally ill cancer patient, a depressed fellow, and a boor steal a used B52 from a parking lot in Arizona—and take it to Libya to exercise a little personal diplomacy. Read full book review >

WINTER'S TALES by Robin Baird-Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"Like the others, the general quality of these never-before- published stories is still high."
The eighth edition of this annual anthology is still cosmopolitan but also slighter and more meta-literary than previously. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO UNDERSTOOD CATS by Michael Allen Dymmoch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

GLORY SEASON by David Brin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"Brin simply has overreached himself."
Upheaval and strife in a far-future feminist utopia, thoughtfully set forth by the author of The Postman (1985), Earth (1990), etc. On planet Stratos, long isolated from the Human Phylum, women are dominant politically, numerically, and sexually; the most successful women clone themselves to create extended aristocratic families. Read full book review >

LONG WAY FROM HOME by Frederick Busch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"At his best, Busch seems to press for new ways to register characters, their language, and their relationships—but his best shines out only fitfully in this murkily conceived fable."
Responding to a magazine ad that may have been placed by her biological mother, Sarah Barrett abandons her Bucks County family and runs slowly to disaster—in this sedate, ruminative thriller from Busch (Closing Arguments, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
LOVING DAUGHTERS by Olga Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"With echoes of The Rainbow and Women in Love, a proto-feminist take on the Australian outback early in the century: a book that Masters's fans will want to have."
The late Australian writer Masters's (The Rose Fancier, 1991, etc.) first novel, only now being published here: a Lawrentian-like opus about two sisters and a smitten reverend after WW I. Though a little rough around the edges, this first fiction powerfully predicts the biting, unforgettable work that was to follow. Read full book review >
VIRGIL HUNTER by James M. Bellarosa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1993

"Still, a promising beginning."
A barnyard romp with a distinctly Twainian twang—in a first novel that revels in the wonders and pitfalls that await a young lad on his perilous journey toward adulthood. Read full book review >
DISCOVERING EVE by Jane Candia Coleman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1993

"Even when sketchy, her lyricism usually saves the day."
Coleman's second collection (after Stories from Mesa Country, 1991): mostly delicate explorations of the passage of adolescents into adulthood and of married women into the complexities of adultery or disenchantment. Read full book review >
THE SILENCER by Simon Louvish
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1993

"Action fanciers will drift off early, humor fanciers a little later, policy wonks will make it to the end."
In a first US publication for Anglo-Israeli author Louvish, the Intifada, the Mossad, American wacko fundamentalism, the NYPD, ultra-orthodox West Bank settlers, the CIA, rabid supporters of all or some of the above, as well as the mayor of Jerusalem, fill the much too exciting days of an Israeli journalist who would rather hide among the TV listings. Read full book review >
STILL EXPLOSION by Mary Logue
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1993

"A false spring, with all too little mystery, for capable newcomer Laura."
Logue's first hardcover takes Twin Cities journalist Laura Malloy inside the Lakewood Family Planning Clinic just in time for a pipe bomb to kill Bobby Jameson, who's there with his abortion-bound girlfriend Christine Larsen. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 1993

"Slight."
Yugoslavian writer Pavi (Dictionary of the Khazars, 1988; Landscape Painted With Tea, 1990) loves to twin his metaphors, tropes, and conceits. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >