Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

BLUE HOLE by G.D. Gearino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Will appeal to readers willing to forego action and suspense in order to delve into the psyches of complex and admittedly endearing characters."
Set in small-town Georgia circa 1969, this exercise in leisurely front-porch storytelling from Gearino (What the Deaf-Mute Heard, 1995, etc.) casts its lot with character over action. Read full book review >
THE THIRD BODY by Hélène Cixous
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"The luckless fourth body (the reader's) will probably not remain awake long enough to partake of any subsequent signs of life (there ain't many)."
The Third Body ($24.95; Aug.; 168 pp.; 0-8101-1687-1). Read full book review >

MAPS by Nuruddin Farah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"One of the best novels out of Africa in some time."
Maps ($23.95; Aug.; 272 pp.; 1-55970-485-3): Originally published in 1986, this is the first installment in Farah's abovementioned trilogy (its concluding volume, Secrets, appeared here alone in 1998). Read full book review >
NIGHT OF THE WOLF by Alice Borchardt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Even stronger and deeper than The Silver Wolf."
For her fourth outing, a sequel to the well-received The Silver Wolf (1998), Anne Rice's older sister once again plays to her strengths by drawing readers into the sensibilities of her werewolf protagonists. Read full book review >
SEVEN DREAMS OF ELMIRA by Patrick Chamoiseau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"A minor but charming addition to Chamoiseau's exotic and distinctive oeuvre."
Seven Dreams Of Elmira ($20.00; Aug.; 64 pp.; photographs by Jean-Luc Laguardique; 1-58195-002-0): This quaint and curious little volume combines a number of striking photographs (black and white and color landscapes and portraits) that celebrate the West Indian island of Martinique with a terse prose poem written by that island's most successful literary export: the Creole-born author of such lush, exuberant fictions as Texaco (1997) and Solibo Magnificent (1998). Read full book review >

FLORIDA ROADKILL by Tim Dorsey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Dorsey's voice is laconic and distinctive. And his management of single scenes is skillful. Structural weaknesses and improbable coincidences aside, then: an amusing beach read."
Hilarious set pieces distinguish this otherwise sluggishly plotted contribution to Sunbelt Baroque, the genre epitomized by Carl Hiaasen and Elmore Leonard. Read full book review >
LESTRADE AND THE DEADLY GAME by M.J. Trow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Hard-core Holmesians need not apply."
The Games are afoot—the 1908 London Olympics, that is. Read full book review >
HONOR THY WIFE by Norman Bogner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Good storytelling, and without the ghoulish moments of To Die in Provence (1977). ($100,000 ad/promo)"
A highly involved soaper whose title's irony is clear when criminal lawyer Terry Brett shows himself willing to honor both of his wives. Read full book review >
A LONG WAY FROM HOME by Connie Briscoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Heartfelt, but a thin and unsatisfying take on a weighty and still urgent subject. (First printing of 150,000, $350,000 ad/promo, author tour)"
In a disappointing third novel, the bestselling author of Big Girls Don—t Cry (1996), etc., draws on her family's history in a story about slavery, miscegenation, and the Civil War. Read full book review >
CRADLE AND ALL by Zachary Alan Fox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Less would have been more for Fox (When the Wind Blows, 1998, etc.), a writer of the school of plot-till-you-drop."
An overblown suspenser about a madwoman stalking a thoroughly good woman in ways you wouldn't believe. Read full book review >
VICTIM'S CHOICE by Michael McClister
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 30, 1999

"Except for an anticlimactic epilogue, McClister's debut is a scorcher that'll burn the tips off your fingers."
Devastated by the killings of his two children a year ago, TV news reporter Joe Colby is reduced to disguising himself in a wig and mustache and attacking strangers on the street so that he can get arrested and thrown into jail along with his target, Boogie Brown, whose jury hung (11—1) in favor of conviction. Read full book review >
SWALLOWING CLOUDS by Lillian Ng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 26, 1999

"Unmotivated sex, even as syrupy as this, is the province of windup toys. And because Ng's characters are sketched in monotone, their fate inspires only mystification."
A young Chinese woman exiled to Australia reenacts the ancient rituals of sex with a married man - with disastrous results - in a first US publication by the Singapore-born Ng. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >