Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1756)

RATS, BATS & VATS by Dave Freer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Inventive and often smile-worthy, though it's far from certain that the authors' unlikely setup hangs logically together."
Noirish comedy alien shoot-'em-up, from paperback author Freer and collaborator Flint (1632, Feb. 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
SENTRY PEAK by Harry Turtledove
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Turtledove has a following, but nevertheless: shrug, so what?"
More fantasy-history from the prodigious Turtledove production line (Into the Darkness, p. 218, etc.). Read full book review >

RED STICK MEN by Tim Parrish
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Parrish covers a lot of ground—the '60s, '70s, '80s; the wars in Vietnam, Panama, and the Persian Gulf; bigotry, violence, and the forces of nature—but at the heart of every story is the very familiar human need for love, respect, and understanding. Fine work."
A refreshing—at times inspirational—debut collection about hard-working people trying to do the right thing. Read full book review >
FOOL’S GOLD by Vivien Armstrong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

Leaving the designer sale she's crashed in some haste because the building has caught on fire, artist Anabel Gordon grabs the wrong handbag. Read full book review >
THE CAIRO HOUSE by Samia Serageldin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Serageldin's richly observed study of a family and culture in transition and crisis succeeds both as ironical Proustian reminiscence and as a telling exploration of the ambiguities of status, loyalty, and belonging."
The postwar history of Egypt is skillfully woven into this evocative first novel's portrayal of a wealthy Cairo family's susceptibility to the winds of political change. Read full book review >

IN SEARCH OF WALID MASOUD by Jabra Ibrahim Jabra
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Beautifully fashioned, unusual, and richly satisfying."
First published in 1978, this intricate Palestinian novel recounts in fragmentary form the complex legacy left behind (along with an enigmatic tape recording discovered after his unexplained disappearance) by the eponymous Walid: a financial expert, author, and political activist in Baghdad during the quarter-century following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Think of it as an early Christmas present to yourself. The perfect bedside book—as long as there's a light left on in the hallway."
There are pleasures aplenty in this latest doorstopper field-report from the world of unicorns, wizards, altered mental states, and magical transformations. Read full book review >
LABOR DAY by Floyd Kemske
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"It's virtually impossible to find someone to root for but, then, that's the point. Wry, sly, depressing."
Kemske's fifth novel (The Third Lion, 1998, etc.) offers the big business gadfly's by-now familiar array of zingers and stingers aimed at wayward corporate America. Read full book review >
WINTER RANGE by Claire Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Davis's skill brings wintry Montana alive—predictably bleak, unexpectedly vibrant—and if her characters inch over the top at times, most readers won't mind unduly."
Nothing—not the people, not the land, not the winter—is merely life-size in this brilliant, and beautifully written, debut novel from storywriter and Pushcart-winner Davis. Read full book review >
ACTS OF GOD by Mary Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Needs a shot of adrenaline."
A middle-aged woman who can't seem to get her life in focus realizes the past is bogging her down—in this melancholy new novel by Morris, a superb travel writer (Angels and Aliens, 1998, etc.) whose fictional achievements continue to be erratic. Read full book review >
L.I.E. by David Hollander
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"One finishes L.I.E. both frustrated by its vagueness and, paradoxically, confident that its talented author is capable of better work."
Formal innovations are the most interesting features of this rangy first novel, which assembles ten interrelated stories and a brief coda to trace the uneasy maturing of a Long Island teenager. Read full book review >
RETRO RETRO by Amy Prior
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Regardless, most of their stories burn at the same heat: tepid."
Using a McLuhanesque idea—the notion that, when faced with the totally new, we seek refuge in the past—editor Prior gathers an anthology of short fiction, heavy on contemporary British writers with a handful of somewhat better-known Americans, that looks back to earlier decades with something like nostalgia. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >