Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

ELIOT’S BANANA by Heather Swain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2003

"Romance fiction right on target for rocker girls with a little therapy under their belts."
Engaging debut about death, modern romance, and growing up. Read full book review >
LAST CITADEL by David L. Robbins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2003

"Some interesting characters and compelling set pieces, but from this talented storyteller (Scorched Earth, 2002, etc.), it's a slow-moving disappointment, impeded by all that tank lore."
The last WWII battle between the Russians and the Germans produced a crescendo of death and destruction—and, now, a surprisingly flat novel. Read full book review >

KNEE-DEEP IN WONDER by April Reynolds
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2003

"Strong writing throughout, however, from a very promising writer with a world-class imagination."
An earnest debut novel painstakingly records an uprooted black woman's recovery of her scattered family's even more scattered history. Read full book review >
ONE PILL MAKES YOU SMALLER by Lisa Dierbeck
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A strong debut exploring the subtleties of sex, power, and growing up in the '70s."
A disturbing coming-of-ager about a girl who grows up one '70s summer amid drugs, sex, and art camp. Read full book review >
PLAY MONEY by Phillip Allen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A debut novel with lots of zeroes coming after it."
A 30-year-old Wall Street lawyer and first-novelist depicts young men caught up in the sparkling and expensive world of 1990s financial intrigue. Read full book review >

DRIFTING by Stephanie Gertler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Glum and contrived."
Another mawkish family drama from the author of Jimmy's Girl (2001), etc. Read full book review >
EVE IN THE CITY by Thomas Rayfiel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"An enviably intelligent piece of writing."
Rayfiel's third novel continues the education of Eve from Colony Girl (1999). Read full book review >
EMPIRE OF LIGHT by David Czuchlewski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A major speed bump in an otherwise promising career. Is this actually Czuchlewski's first novel? It's tempting to think so."
A Princeton grad's enigmatic relationships with a beautiful rich girl and the religious group that claims and possesses her provide the unstable center for this strained, turgid second novel. Read full book review >
DAIMONS by Nina Fitzpatrick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Despite the wooly New Age wrappings, a delightful portrait of an enchanted (and hilarious) land inhabited by a race of genial madmen—Ireland, in other words."
The secret lives of the elves and fairies who run the Emerald Isle, courtesy of Fitzpatrick (a.k.a. Nina Witozek, Polish-born, and the late Patrick Sheerhan). Read full book review >
ONE VACANT CHAIR by Joe Coomer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Coomer's canvas is too crowded. He does Scotland proud, but at the expense of the family rearranging itself back home—which is where the novel lives. Still, an enjoyable read, without a dull page."
Surprises and sucker punches keep things lively in this latest from Coomer (Apologizing to Dogs, 1999, etc.), a tale of emotional upheavals in a far-flung family about to be flung farther. Read full book review >
OPERATION MONSOON by Shona Ramaya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"American-minded modernity struggles aimlessly against the soul of paradoxical India."
Five novella-ish stories meander ironically through modern Indian subjects. Read full book review >
DREADFULWATER SHOWS UP by Hartley GoodWeather
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Even armchair sleuths who can see the solution from a mile away will appreciate GoodWeather's unerring knack for converting social, racial, and economic conflict into blissful farce."
GoodWeather, a.k.a. novelist Thomas King (Truth and Bright Water, 2000, etc.), debuts with a droll comedy of murder on a reservation overrun with developers, technocrats, and Native American goofballs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >