Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

THE DUMB HOUSE by John Burnside
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Still, Burnside's poetry urges us with remarkably few misgivings into his story, which seizes hold of readers like a virus."
An adenoidally creepy, affecting debut about one man's mad hunt for the origins of language and the soul. Read full book review >
ALSO RISING by W. Joe Innis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Amusing, pretentiously anti-pretentious, portrait of the artist as an earnest schlemiel, leavened with an ironic, Hemingwayesque admiration of its south-of-the-border setting."
Choppy postmodern backward glance at Hemingwayesque bullfighting ethos, recast as a macho conflict between artists in southern Mexico. Read full book review >

THE DADDY CLOCK by Judy Markey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"With wit and warmth, newcomer Markey, a longtime syndicated humor columnist in the Chicago Sun-Times, gets the tone just right."
Charlie Feldman wants a baby. Read full book review >
EATING CHINESE FOOD NAKED by Mei Ng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A coming-of-age story that pushes all the current multicultural buttons—cuisine, custom, and conflict between generations—but never truly comes alive. (Author tour)"
A Chinese-American's ambitious but flat first novel in which recent college graduate Ruby Lee comes home to face the family she fled. Read full book review >
BOOTH by David Robertson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Lively, colorful, but finally an uncomfortable mix of fact and fancy. (Illustrated with 12 b&w period photographs)"
A first novel about the conspiracy to kill Abraham Lincoln, riveting in its depiction of time and place but less convincing in its characterizations. Read full book review >

OVER THE LINE by Faye Sultan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Realistically rough in the early going, then, but hampered by a fatal lack of invention."
A forensic psychologist struggles to prove that the killer of two old women was insane, in a fact-based case courtesy of Kennedy (Welcome to the End of the World: Prophecy, Rage and the New Age, p. 854, etc.) and first-novelist Sultan. Read full book review >
JANE AND THE WANDERING EYE by Stephanie Barron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Barron's re-creation of the speech, manner, and innermost feelings of her heroine is uncannily on target, but the byzantine plotting and huge canvas of characters—some pedestrian, some intriguing—will be best appreciated by patient Austen aficionados."
Third in a series adopting the era, voice, and persona of Jane Austen (Jane and the Man of the Cloth, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
ONE MUST WAIT by Penny Mickelbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The juicy Louisiana conspiracy is too big and evil and unexpected to yield as easily as it does to C.A.'s questions, even when those questions are put by an investigator with the most powerful motive in the world."
Mickelbury (Night Songs, 1995, not reviewed) kicks off a new series starring Carole Ann Gibson, a black D.C. lawyer who's got it all—a loving lawyer husband, a bungling bank account, a stack of pro bono acquittals (like her latest, a defense of accused cop/bagman Tommy Griffin)—and no job. Read full book review >
A MAGIC-LOVER'S TREASURY OF THE FANTASTIC by Margaret Weis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A well-chosen, pleasingly varied assemblage that deftly avoids both the overly familiar and the tediously obscure."
Twenty substantial stories, 195095, featuring magic in all its many and startling guises. Read full book review >
MORE AMAZING STORIES by Kim Mohan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

The magazine founded by Hugo Gernsback in 1926 finally expired last year; this collection features the 15 new stories that would have formed the next issue of Amazing, together with five reprints from 195394 and an essay from Robert Silverberg about Philip K. Dick's many and impressive tales, one of which (``The Builder'') is featured here. Read full book review >
CELEBRATION by Harry Crews
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Lowbrow comedy, not literary wit."
The once reigning champion of redneck fiction continues his decline with yet another one-joke novel, a farce of hippy-cosmic dimensions. Read full book review >
THE ROCK CHILD by Win Blevins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Historical detail serves a charming treasure."
A colorful novel set among the Mormons in 1862, featuring such real folks as Sam Clemens, Sir Richard Burton, Brigham Young, and Porter Rockwell, by the author of Stone Song (1995), an imaginary life of Crazy Horse. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >