Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR by Stephen Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"As ever, the finest horror collection going, with no leaning on hackwork."
Horrormeister Jones defends his collections against Internet carpings that he favors British writers in his horror annual. While two thirds of the present one is British, that's not the usual balance. And much British material was first published in the US, while other stuff was taken from e-books and small press publications. Read full book review >
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS by Malcolm Forsythe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"A feast for readers with a taste for epic theatrics, innuendo, and bodies buried in the garage."
Amy Foster's granddad dies unexpectedly and there's no money to bury him, so the orphaned youngster decides on burglary as a career. Read full book review >

THE GOLDSMITH’S DAUGHTER by Kate Sedley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Even so, few medieval mysteries rival Sedley's for verve, descriptive prowess, and authenticity."
There are two reasons for 15th-century English peddler Roger the Chapman to visit bustling, rat-infested London. Read full book review >
SUMMER IN BADEN-BADEN by Leonid Tsypkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 28, 2001

"There really is no other book like this."
A brilliant Russian novel, first published in serial form in 1982, then made available in a little-read English translation, grafts onto its omniscient author's account of his own journey to Petersburg (formerly Leningrad) the parallel story of the travels, and travail, of the great Fyodor Dostoevsky. Read full book review >
THE BILLANCOURT TALES by Nina Berberova
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 27, 2001

"Delicately fashioned cameos that deserve a place among the minor classics of expatriate fiction."
A winning collection of 13 previously untranslated stories about exiles living in Paris in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, written for an émigré newspaper in the years 1928-40 by the late (1901-93) author of The Tattered Cloak (1991) and the moving autobiography The Italics Are Mine (not reviewed). Read full book review >

THE ROYAL PHYSICIAN’S VISIT by Per Olov Enquist
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 25, 2001

"Scandinavia hasn't had a Nobel winner since 1974. This may be the book that earns Enquist the prize."
The historical novel has been reborn in recent years, and it reaches impressive new heights in this brilliant 1999 fiction from Swedish author Enquist (Captain Nemo's Library, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
COMING SOON!!! by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 2001

"'Whether the reader finds entertaining or tiresome such smoke-and-mirror tricks, a staple of Postmodernism, will depend on that reader's taste and experience.' The reader couldn't have said it better himself."
Are we ready for this? Another labyrinthine metafiction from the veteran literary gamesman who has beguiled and befuddled readers with such brainteasing doorstoppers as Giles Goat-Boy (1966), Letters (1979), and The Tidewater Tales (1987). Read full book review >
THE VINTAGE BOOK OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE FICTION by Carolyn Choa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 2001

"A very mixed bag, then. But as the only anthology of its kind currently available, well worth a look."
Both ideology and art are served, with varying results, in this nonetheless interesting collection of 21 stories by 19 Chinese writers, most of them little known or unknown in the West. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 2001

Given the resourcefulness of Sherlock Holmes pastiches, it was only a matter of time before Holmes, whose posthumous career has paired him with figures from Sigmund Freud to Jack the Ripper, met Father Brown. Read full book review >
ACT OF MERCY by Peter Tremayne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 19, 2001

"Though Fidelma emerges as more human than before, the loose ends in the rigging are realistic in all the wrong ways, especially when clearing suspects relies so much on looks of blank astonishment."
The intrepid Sister Fidelma is at sea—aboard the Barnacle Goose on pilgrimage to the Shrine of St. Read full book review >
STRIP POKER by Nancy Bartholomew
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 19, 2001

"It's all in good fun, though you have to feel for Sierra's psychotic neighbor Raydean when she asks, 'You ever think you might have an attention-span problem?'"
Sierra Lavotini's craziest Christmas ever begins when her boss Vincent Gambuzzo loses the Tiffany Gentleman's Club to charter-boat captain Mike Riggs in a poker game. Read full book review >
VIOLETS ARE BLUE by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 19, 2001

"A real test for Patterson's huge audience: If they buy this, they'll buy anything."
Only a writer of Patterson's star-wattage could have hoodwinked his publisher into bringing out this unlovely mess, which pits forensic psychologist Alex Cross against two separate serial killers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >