Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

THE TEN THOUSAND by Michael Curtis Ford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Ford brings an interesting, fictively personal outlook to one of the classics. Inspired and highly informed, The Ten Thousand may lead many readers back to the original."
Xenophon's Anabasis provides the model for this epic first novel of Greek mercenaries stranded in the heart of the Persian empire during the late fifth century b.c. Read full book review >
CHICAGO CONFIDENTIAL by Max Allan Collins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"More menace than mystery, but Nate's return to Chicago restores him to his roots, moves this venerable series up to 1950, and shows a deeper grasp of criminal history than most of Nate's star-studded cases (Majic Man, 1999, etc.)."
There's no percentage in Nate Heller's getting involved with Senator Estes Kefauver's investigation of organized crime. Read full book review >

THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF AWESOME COMIC FANTASY by Mike Ashley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"EWSLUGJK Rowling is far from alone in the making of merry magic."
The Mammoth master's third collection of silly, satiric, ridiculous, cute, pun-packed, cornball fantasy is often fun, but, well, not exactly awesome. Read full book review >
VACATION STORIES by Santiago Ramón y Cajal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"A time capsule for those interested in Victorian intellectual life, but a collection that will seem oppressively pedantic to most contemporary readers."
Ramón y Cajal was one of those bright-eyed rationalists who ran hither and yon through the 19th century as if they were children in a toy shop. Read full book review >
AMSTERDAM by Manfred Wolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Another inviting and instructive Companion from Whereabouts."
Readers' groups ought to check out this publisher's series of geographically focused anthologies, which offer lively piecemeal portrayals of various faraway places in attractive, inexpensive volumes. Read full book review >

ACROSS THE RIVER by Alice Taylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Pleasures that have less to do with story than with Taylor's portrait of rural Irish life. An amiable cast and description aplenty for those looking for a bit of an Irish idyll."
A sequel to The Woman of the House (1999) takes up with the Phelan family eight years later. Read full book review >
DON’T BELIEVE YOUR LYING EYES by Blair S. Walker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"While not as Baltimospheric as Laura Lippman, Walker's at his best when wandering the mean streets with Billups, or riffing on race, or just talking trash, with the mystery a real but secondary interest."
Homicide detective Scott Donatelli understands that it's Baltimore Herald reporter Darryl Billups's job to investigate crimes. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF PITHIVIERS by Sheila Kohler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Romantic-suspense fiction, however worthy Kohler's aims, that isn't strong enough to support its weighty objective."
With only medium success, the children's concentration camp at Pithiviers is the inspiration for this indictment of French collaboration with the Germans in WWII. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"And yet: neurotically charming and funny, the adopted single dad still wins our sympathy."
The prolific science-fiction and YA author takes a respite from Dingillian family strife (Bouncing Off the Moon, 2001) with a hasty, jokey, and very personal account of a middle-aged gay man's adoption of a high-risk eight-year-old boy. Read full book review >
UNINVITED by Richard House
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"The heady first days of a relationship and the daily hardships of a life on the edge create narrative tension that builds steadily but in unexpected ways: the result is a story memorable in its complexity and depth."
Second novel from British author House (Bruiser, not reviewed): an intricate, tangled tale about two weeks of romance and violence in squatters' London. Read full book review >
INFIDELITY FOR FIRST-TIME FATHERS by Mark Barrowcliffe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"The unrelenting cleverness gets tiring, although the one-liners frequently ring uncomfortably true."
From the nastily comic Barrowcliffe (Girlfriend 44, 2001), the perfect Hugh Grant vehicle about a too-clever-by-half Londoner who faces a stew of moral and emotional crises when he learns that both his fiancé and his much younger girlfriend are joyfully pregnant, thanks to him. Read full book review >
MY LOOSE THREAD by Dennis Cooper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Enough glimpses of the familiar to make a skin-crawling read. In spite of the taboos being flaunted, this is a remarkable portrait of a soul in hell."
Ever true to his transgressive muse, Cooper opens another shop of horrors suitable to follow his five-novel cycle (Period, 2000, etc.), here coupling sexually involved teenaged brothers with a post-Columbine world skanky enough to strike dread into the heart of any parent of adolescents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >