Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

DAY OF THE BEES by Thomas Sanchez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"On balance, though, too far over the top to persuade us of its (supposedly) larger-than-life characters' reality. `Love is always a mutilation of the self,` Zermano intones at one particularly emotional moment. In this novel, it's also a noisy, grandiose distraction."
An intense but ultimately disappointing fourth novel from Sanchez (Mile Zero, 1989, etc.), this time about a passionate love that long outlasts WWII, which separates a famed Spanish artist from his French mistress. Read full book review >
ELEGY FOR KOSOVO by Ismail Kadare
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"As such, it's a revealing addition to such acclaimed novels as Chronicle in Stone and The Three-Arched Bridge, and one of Kadare's most eloquent books."
Albania's Kadare is probably the premier writer of fiction to have emerged from the Balkan countries since Bosnian Nobel-winning novelist Ivo Andric. Read full book review >

GRAVEYARD OF THE ATLANTIC by Alyson Hagy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Occasionally a little studied in tone and attitude, but this is honest work from a thoughtful craftswoman."
Strong, polished stories, many previously published in literary quarterlies, by an accomplished veteran in this genre (Hardware River, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
NATIONAL NANCYS by Fred Hunter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"It's hard to remain politically neutral when you know as many dykes as we do," says Alex Reynolds. Read full book review >
THE MYSTIFIED MAGISTRATE by Marquis de Sade
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"An elegant addition to an important (if troubling) 'oeuvre,' skillfully translated and handsomely presented."
Written during the notorious Marquis's long imprisonment for indecency and blasphemy, these comparatively benign cautionary tales eloquently mock the hypocrisy of draconian lawgivers (in "The Windbags of Provence"), lascivious clerics ("The Husband Who Turned Priest"), and even Sade's own mortally offended mother-in-law ("Emilie de Tourville"). Read full book review >

LOSING EUGENIO by Geneviève Brisac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"But Brisac's tale is so relentlessly morose and claustrophobic that it's hard to work up significant empathy even for characters as obviously decent and deserving as these."
This 1996 novel, which won France's prestigious Prix Femina, is a rigorously understated picture of an impoverished single mother, Nouk, who sacrifices her own artistic sensibility and skills to the raising of her young son, the eponymous Eugenio. Read full book review >
READY TO FALL by Claire Cook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"A modest first effort in need of greater depth to ballast the weight of its subject."
A lackluster debut, written in the form of e-mails, attempts drama but simply illustrates through its own flatness the detachment of online relationships. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO WROTE THE BOOK by Erik Tarloff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"A decorously risqué update of Lucky Jim with a climax out of The Big Clock. Tarloff (Face-Time, 1999) by-passes the normal pleasures of fiction to focus entirely on chastely high-concept fantasy."
A sweetly amusing fairy tale about all the nice things that happen to a college teacher who anonymously publishes a dirty book. Read full book review >
THE TRAIN NOW DEPARTING by Martha Grimes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"But readers who come to Grimes for a Richard Jury-like experience should be warned: these are lives of very quiet desperation."
A pair of thematically connected novellas—about loneliness—by the author of the Richard Jury mysteries (The Stargazey, 1998, etc.) and, most recently, Biting the Moon (1999). Read full book review >
IN THE UPPER ROOM by Terry Bisson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"More playful, less thoughtful, than the earlier collection, but rousing entertainment, underwear, equations, entities and all."
Another collection from accomplished storysmith Bisson, his first since Bears Discover Fire (1993), composed of 16 ``likely stories,'' 1994-2000. Read full book review >
ETRUSCANS by Morgan Llywelyn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Expect sequels."
Historical—in the broadest sense—fantasy from the Irelandresident authors of 1916, etc., (Morgan) and various horror yarns and Celtic fantasies (Scott). Read full book review >
THE CARRIER by Holden Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"High-concept plotting, low-voltage cast."
In Scott's second `high concept` medical thriller (after Skeptic, 1999), a miracle cure goes awry. Likewise the novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >