Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

AFFAIR by Amanda Quick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Skillful, lively storytelling, with a heroine who'd be compelling in any era."
COLD MOUNTAIN by Charles Frazier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"A promising but overlong, uneven debut. (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
A grim story about a tough, resourceful Southern family in the Civil War is somewhat submerged by the weight of lyrical detail piled on the tale, and by the slow pace of the telling. Read full book review >

WEDDING PICTURES by Jacqueline Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Osborn's New Yorker-ish style will guarantee that this book shows up at bridal showers this wedding season, if only to console more conventional brides."
Thirty or so short dialogues, each with a full-page color painting to illustrate, make up this short story (billed as a ``novel'') about the wedding between two yuppies, from their offbeat proposal to the last minutes of the trendy reception. Read full book review >
LADY OF AVALON by Marion Zimmer Bradley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Bradley also includes helpful lists of people and places and a map. (First printing of 150,000; $150,000 ad/promo)"
This smoky mix of magic, legend, people both mythic and real, and the ancient savageries of war supplies a chronological link between Bradley's The Forest House (1994), set in first-century Britain, and her Arthurian saga, The Mists of Avalon (1983). Read full book review >
BRANDENBURG by Glenn Meade
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Another literate and suspenseful thriller from an estimable storyteller who proves that beginner's luck had nothing to do with his impressive debut. (First printing of 125,000; $250,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Having cleared up the mystery of Stalin's death (Snow Wolf, 1996), Meade chronicles to chilling effect the rise and fall of a Fourth Reich led by Hitler's long-lost son. Read full book review >

ALL SOULS' DAY by Bill Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"While the prose is occasionally only serviceable, Morris's version of the moment when America, out of duplicity and arrogance, became tragically enmeshed in Vietnam, is deeply moving, a persuasive vision of the greatest tragedy in our recent past. (Author tour)"
An angry, moving, ingenious blend of fact and fiction about the early stages of the war in Vietnam. Read full book review >
HOME TO INDIA by Jacquelin Singh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Predictable fare, but Singh nicely depicts her frustrated heroine unraveling the elaborate configurations of domesticity in India."
Former Californian Singh's first US publication is a well- crafted, if somewhat uncomplicated, story describing the adventures of an American woman who surrenders the life she knows to be with her husband—and his other wife—in India. Read full book review >
THE PURIFICATION CEREMONY by Mark T. Sullivan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Shorn of the heavy-going mystical ruminations that are bound to be cut, the inevitable movie should be a first-rate actioner. (First printing of 300,000; $250,000 ad/promo)"
Hunters get hunted by a vengeful lunatic in this all-stops- out yarn of the world's worst hunting trip. Read full book review >
THE CLAIRVOYANT by Marian Thurm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Like its protagonists, Thurm's latest is as brisk, charming, and good-natured as they come—but so slight that it leaves only a phantom aftertaste on the literary tongue."
Thurm revisits favorite themes (death, interracial marriage, life in New York) in her characteristically lighthearted way in her fourth novel (The Way We Live Now, 1991, etc.), this featuring a Manhattan psychic who chats with ghosts and interferes compulsively with the lives of those he loves. Read full book review >
FOUR DECADES by Gordon Weaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Whiskey, Whiskey, Gin, Gin, Gin,'' are unpersuasive), this nonetheless should serve to direct readers back to Weaver's large, often somber, and distinguished body of work."
Weaver is a prolific short-story writer (seven volumes, including, most recently, The Way We Know in Dreams, 1994) and, as this sampler of nine tales drawn from his collections and three previously uncollected stories makes plain, he's also an extraordinarily skilled craftsman. Read full book review >
BIG BLONDES by Jean Echenoz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Their enthusiasm is agreeably infectious."
Big Blondes ($22.00; June 1997; 208 pp.; 1-56584-340-1): This noir-derived comic thriller (a close relation to such splendidly deranged predecessors as its author's Cherokee, 1987, and Lac, 1995) recounts a TV producer's elaborate pursuit of a fugitive pop singer, the glamorous and quite possibly dangerous Gloria Stella. Read full book review >
THE WAY HOME IS LONGER by Christopher Renino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 1997

"An engaging, sure-handed first novel that uses baseball and an outer-borough milieu to excellent advantage in evoking a seemingly simpler time, when youth's losses were as painful as ever but its griefs more privately held."
Newcomer Renino offers a remarkably affecting debut about a young man's coming of age in postWW II Brooklyn. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >