Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

THE ROYAL FAMILY by William T. Vollmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Not for the squeamish, certainly. Nonetheless, an intensely readable, often moving, and frequently shocking atlas of modern degradation and despair."
A sprawling urban epic of obsession, by one of our most ambitious (and idiosyncratic) contemporary writers. Read full book review >
JANE AND THE STILLROOM MAID by Stephanie Barron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Now that she's rebutted years of condescending descriptions of Austen's life as placid and uneventful, Barron writes with greater assurance than ever, and her heroine's sleuthing is more confident and accomplished—even if she's still unwisely pining for the unworthy Trowbridge."
Nominally under the protection of her hymn-singing, trout-fishing, sycophantic cousin Edward Cooper, Jane Austen visits the Derbyshire Peak District in her fifth outing (Jane and the Genius of the Place, 1999, etc.) Read full book review >

A LOST PARADISE by Junichi Watanabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"A grownup love story and then some, powered by two brilliant characterizations and some unusually acute psychological analysis."
This very popular 1997 Japanese novel, a bestseller that also spawned a successful television series and feature film, is a relentlessly detailed chronicle of the folie d'amour that consumes a middle-aged publishing executive and a younger woman, both unhappily married to other spouses, each devoted to histories and images of others before them who gave all for love. Read full book review >
THE FT. LARNED INCIDENT by Mardi Oakley Medawar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Strip away the loincloth and moccasins, and what's left is a cross between Jerry Springer and daytime drama."
Never mind the white man's reneging on promises and Kiowa warriors ringing the fort, brandishing rifles in one hand and liquor in the other. Read full book review >
ELIZABETH AND AFTER by Matt Cohen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"An extremely satisfying work, finding new depth in old themes, and offering a fitting memorial to a talented, deeply humane writer."
A strong, spare, autumnal tale of loss and redemption, winner of the Governor General's Award, and the final work from Cohen (The Bookseller, 1996, etc.), a talented, hard-working Canadian novelist who died, at age 52, in 1999. Read full book review >

THE LOST LEGENDS OF NEW JERSEY by Frederick Reiken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Young as he is, Reiken knows the territory of emotional commitment and confusion as well as anybody writing today. Beautiful stuff."
The gentle empathy for the intricate muddle of family and romantic relationships that distinguished Reiken's accomplished debut, The Odd Sea (1998), is also a dominant feature of this considerably more ambitious successor. Read full book review >
MARIKE’S WORLD by Catherine M. Rae
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Less a novel than a catalogue of interesting events."
Another period piece set in Manhattan from the prolific Rae (Sunlight on a Broken Column, 1997, etc.), this time following Dutch-American Marike from the American Revolution through George Washington's inauguration. Read full book review >
THE DAY LAID ON THE ALTAR by Adria Bernardi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"A fine, contemplative work, languorously exploring the passionate impetus to create."
An unusually constructed, polished novel by Bernardi (the forthcoming In the Gathering Woods) offers the stories of three separate Italian Renaissance artists, providing a meditative study on art and life of the time. Read full book review >
LESTRADE AND THE DEAD MAN’S HAND by M.J. Trow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

A hundred years ago, the London Underground was no safer than it is today, especially for the women found dead in the dangerous new cars. Read full book review >
LUCK by Eric Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"'Sometimes,' says Hermelinda's father, 'I think there isn't any why, only luck.' Maybe so, but that's not much wisdom to take away from the continuing injustices Martin so painstakingly chronicles."
When a son of the tobacco fields returns home from Duke, the normal, acceptable kinds of trouble in his North Carolina hometown erupt in the kinds of trouble that make headlines. Read full book review >
A CITIZEN OF THE COUNTRY by Sarah Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Fiction just doesn't get any more entertaining and satisfying than this. A bloody triumph."
The conclusion to Smith's neo-Victorian trilogy (The Vanished Child, 1992; The Knowledge of Water, 1996) is a virtuosic fusion of speculative history, boldly stylized character drawing, and intricately plotted rousing melodrama. Read full book review >
AQUA EROTICA by Mary Anne Mohanraj
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Hot and wet—also extremely well crafted."
It would have to be a very steamy bath indeed to match the temperature of the best stories collected here, which use the unifying metaphor of water to ring some sexy changes on the usual tanglings of orifices and organs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >