Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

THE GIRLS by Helen Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"Not one of Yglesias's best, but nevertheless a thoughtful, grimly convincing portrait of old age: something of a rarity in our fiction, and a story well worth attending to."
Yglesias's first novel in 12 years (The Saviors, 1987, etc.) is an intense portrayal of four elderly sisters variously raging against the dying of the light in contemporary Miami Beach. Read full book review >
A MIRACLE IN PARADISE by Carolina Garcia-Aguilera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"Along the way, though, Lupe (Bloody Shame, 1997, etc.) folds a tense anti-Castro subplot and some disturbingly manipulative sex into a tale whose ending couldn't possibly have satisfied everybody."
Something funny is going on among the Order of the Illumination of the Sacred Virgin. Read full book review >

HOW ALIENS THINK by Judith Grossman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"Like the English sky, Grossman's work is mostly gray, but its sudden bursts of sunlight feel all the brighter for the surrounding gloom."
A first collection by English novelist Grossman (Her Own Terms, 1988), whose expatriate view of the US is fresh enough to distract a reader from the drabness of her pedantic prose and academic settings. Read full book review >
WAITING by Ha Jin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 1999

"Ha Jin has established himself as one of the great sturdy realists still writing in a postmodern age."
A kind of Chinese Dr. Zhivago about a married army doctor who falls in love with a nurse during the Cultural Revolution, by Chinese exile Ha Jin (In the Pond, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >
THE WHOLENESS OF A BROKEN HEART by Katie Singer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 1999

"A novel written around an idea that, instead of liberating the tale's possibilities, confines them like a kind of conceptual corset."
A first novel revisits, over four generations, the exhaustively plumbed relationship between mothers and daughters who learn to accept each other only when it's almost too late. Read full book review >

PLAINSONG by Kent Haruf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 1999

"A touching work, as honest and precise as the McPheron brothers themselves."
A stirring meditation on the true nature and necessity of the family. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

MYSTERY MIDRASHAn Anthology of Jewish Mystery and Detective FictionRaphael, Lawrence W.—Ed. Read full book review >
THREE WOMEN by Marge Piercy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"While the tempestuous turns occasionally prove excessive, the tangled relationships here are credible to the core, with the voices of the older generations being especially poignant."
Three generations, three strong wills, and the never-resolved conflicts within a family are the bedrock of this latest from the wide-ranging Piercy (Storm Tide, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >
EDDIE'S BASTARD by William Kowalski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Knock-off models are best enjoyed when the original is kept from view, and though its merrily familiar plot can make this somewhat difficult, Kowalski's version will get you from A to B better than most. (First printing of $75,000)"
Newcomer Kowalski pens an entertaining John Irving soufflÇ: a coming-of-age tale about a boy who becomes a novelist, having written a symbolic short story that he includes in a novel about a young boy coming of age. Read full book review >
THE BOOK BORROWER by Alice Mattison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"A rich, textured exploration of misfortune and its consequences: a book that will reward any reader willing to go slowly and absorb its course."
Mattison's third novel (after Hilda and Pearl, 1995, etc.) is actually a successful graft of two tales: one written by a 1920s feminist and radical, the other about the woman who reads that "first book" in the late 20th century. Read full book review >
NEUROTICA by Melvin Jules--Ed. Bukiet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"One bite and you're lost."
Any collection of erotic Jewish fiction that begins with Woody Allen's four-star "The Whore of Mensa" and continues with Harold Brodkey's 30-page single-sex-act orgasm chase, "Innocence," has to be absolutely first-rate—and Neurotica is. Read full book review >
FALLING DARK by Tim Tharp
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Badly organized and far too loose, but Tharp's debut has a poignancy and grace that gets it over the bumps on its way: Worth a look."
A rambling but interesting debut (winner of the Milkweed National Fiction Prize) about a troubled family that comes under the influence of a drifter and his drug-dealing boss. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >