Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1759)

CLEOPATRA GOLD by William J. Caunitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"But Caunitz's novel view that druglords are only the triggermen for the Man's interdepartmental squabbles could sell big copies. (First printing of 75,000)"
Another sprawling report from the NYPD, this one tracing the cross-plotted attempts of two divisions to infiltrate a world-class heroin gang. Read full book review >
SIGN LANGUAGES by James Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Hannah's plots are uneven, but his ear for mood and tone is nearly unerring—and the collection, for that reason, has a cumulative power that the individual stories don't have on their own."
An eclectic, bittersweet group of nine stories—Hannah's second book of fiction (Desperate Measures, 1988—not reviewed)- -mostly concerning lonesome men in exile who struggle desperately for human connection or who write off humankind. Read full book review >

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT by Sebastien Japrisot
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"As tricky as Japrisot's earlier bestsellers in his native France (The Passion of Women, 1990, etc.)—but also precisely, surprisingly evocative of the lingering pain of mourning and the burdens of survival."
Dissatisfied with the official account of her fiancÇ Jean Etchevery's death in WW I, wheelchair-bound painter Mathilde Donnay resolves to find out the truth—with unexpectedly moving results at the end of a twisted trail. Read full book review >
A DANGEROUS ENCOUNTER by Ernst Jünger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Delicately mannered and full of nuance, this is certainly subtle—but a side effect of its careful, quiet understatement is that is seems over before it's really begun."
An innocent young German receives a rude awakening at the hands of world-weary decadents in fin de siäcle Paris—in a polished tale from the prolific JÅnger, a 97-year-old author who's acclaimed in Europe but little known here. Read full book review >
PSYCHE by Peter Michalos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

Michaelos's first novel is the story—told through letters and diary entries—of Freud's treatment of his first hysteria patient- -here known as Lucy O. The young and just-married Freud (it's 1886) believes that Lucy suffers from childhood seduction by her imperious and unpleasant father; but in the treatment (through hypnosis) that he embarks upon, the ambitious young doctor has an even deeper quarry: he suspects that the repressed forces of prehistoric myth themselves are surfacing to produce the attractive young girl's hysteria. ``The patient is, in fact,'' writes Freud, ``greatly discontented with being a girl,'' and, under hypnosis, Lucy recites long passages of a poem about fleet-footed Atalanta, the mythic girl who, alone among male hunters, took part in the slaying of the Calydonian Boar. Read full book review >

THE COURTYARD OF DREAMS by Anna Monardo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"An alluring tribute to love—of first love, of family, of Italy."
A first novel of great charm that attempts to penetrate the unique genius of the Italian family, both in Italy and in its American version. Read full book review >
OUT OF WORK by Greg Mulcahy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"But all that really comes across is their self-conscious brevity—what is finally the sentimentality of saying too little about what's too insupportably much."
The heavy influence of Raymond Carver, plus a touch of Hemingway and cyberpunk, distills Mulcahy's debut collection—which includes a novella, ``Glass''—down to an edgy, somewhat paranoid vision of general failure and desuetude. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST SCIENCE FICTION by Gardner Dozois
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 30, 1993

"Finally, a disappointing entry in a hitherto superlative series."
As the number of entries dwindles (28 last time, 24 this), the average length increases; here, take out the two novellas previously published as independent hardcovers (Michael Swanwick's Griffin's Egg and Frederik Pohl's Outnumbering the Dead) and the short-story version of Arthur C. Clarke's latest novel, The Hammer of Gold (p. 492), and 1992's Best SF begins to look decidedly hyperbolic. Read full book review >
GUARD OF HONOR by William P. Kennedy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 29, 1993

"There's an awful lot of filler in this poorly constructed morality tale, and Mex is too much of a lightweight for the role of avenging angel."
The chickens come home to roost when American soldiers, on a base in Dixie, are the victims of their own counterinsurgency techniques intended for Third World warfare; this latest from Kennedy (Rules of Encounter, 1992, etc.) is more preachy than suspenseful. Read full book review >
50% OFF by Karen Salmansohn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 26, 1993

"Nora Ephron of the MTV generation,'' as the publisher's promo copy claims."
``Becoming involved in a relationship is a lot like being lured into a Hare Krishna cult''—so begins this long narrative necklace of good-natured one-liners posing as a novel of twentysomething love. Read full book review >
RAISE THE RED LANTERN by Su Tong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 26, 1993

"A writer to watch."
From a member of China's New Wave, three novellas of a disturbing intensity make their US debut—including ``Raise the Red Lantern,'' the basis of an acclaimed 1991 film. Read full book review >
UGLY WAYS by Tina McElroy Ansa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 26, 1993

"A tale of dysfunction that opens with a bang—but repetitive, episodic, and, in the end, less illuminating than it might have been."
Three black sisters reunite in their Georgia hometown to embrace, scream, smoke, contemplate suicide, and swap clothes while preparing for their mother's funeral—in a rambling follow-up to Ansa's Baby of the Family (1989). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >