Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1768)

IONA MOON by Melanie Rae Thon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Thon writes capably, but her prose is not yet powerful enough, nor her characters autonomous enough, to make her monochromatic world memorable."
Lives overflowing with pain are what Thon offers in her second novel (following Meteors in August, 1990), this time focusing on three Idaho teenagers. Read full book review >
SEPARATE ROOMS by Pier Vittorio Tondelli
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"A sweet-natured swan song, and a notable addition to the gay- fiction bookshelf."
From the late Tondelli (who died in 1991 of AIDS), a first US publication: the story of Italian writer Leo's pilgrimage in search of gay love and, especially, in homage to Thomas, with whom he enjoyed the affair of his life. ``Into Silence'' (the first of three movements—Thomas was a musician) finds Leo flying to Munich, Thomas's hometown, and flashing back to his first meeting with his German lover—who was not ``a Whitman'' (i.e., promiscuous) but had ``an aura of tenderness.'' Tondelli's prose lyrically evokes Leo's yearning and the arc of the affair while also providing a tour of European gay lifestyles before fast-cutting to Thomas dying in Munich and an hallucinogenic dark night of the soul for Leo. Read full book review >

THE HARD TO CATCH MERCY by William Baldwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"That's a pity, too, because overall Baldwin's debut has considerable charm, tall tales and all. (First printing of 20,000)"
Episodes from a southern boyhood: family intrigue, post-Civil War history, race, religion, and superstition are all part of the mix in Baldwin's meandering first novel. Read full book review >
THE DEEP BLUE MEMORY by Monique Urza
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"A brocade of bright conceits that needs more air and space."
A meditative, richly imaged (perhaps a shade too richly) fictional memoir having to do with the secret darks and the secure, loving frame of family. Read full book review >
GAI-JIN by James Clavell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"You get your money's worth if you want to spend it here."
Back to feudal Japan, which now enters the modern world, from the master of the three-decker behemoth (Shogun, Tai-pan, Noble House, etc.). Read full book review >

BY THE SWORD by Greg Costikyan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Costikyan makes no claim to seriousness or originality, but his engagingly lighthearted, tongue-in-cheek adventure is expertly tuned and pitched for the fantasy-gamer audience."
Heroic fantasy with a twinkle in its eye and a spring in its step: the novel version of an on-line computer network serial written by noted fantasy-game author Costikyan. Read full book review >
GRAY SKIES TOMORROW by Silvia Molina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

Frankly autobiographical short novel about Molina's doomed youthful affair with Mexican poet JosÇ Carlos Becerra. Read full book review >
FLAVOR OF THE MONTH by Olivia Goldsmith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 1993

"On Hollywood, Thomas Tryon is more touching, and Nathanael West more literate—but no one can touch Goldsmith for gusto."
In The First Wives Club (1992), Goldsmith was like a dog with a bone on the subject of rotten husbands; in her second novel, she's latched onto another theme that's almost as meaty: Hollywood, which she masticates with characteristic wicked glee. Read full book review >
PECULIAR POLITICS by Katia Spiegelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 30, 1993

"More flat than fizzy."
A racy and sometimes witty romp through New York's yuppieland, a nasty urban jungle where making connections both sexual and professional is the only way to go. Read full book review >
THE SLEEPER WAKES by Marcy Knopf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 30, 1993

"Not always a great read, but the only anthology of its kind."
Fourteen black women write of racism and exploitation, passing southern folkways, social and color discrimination within the black community, and love and corruption among upper-class whites—all in styles that range from romantic melodrama to social realism, irony to broad humor. Read full book review >
LIFE IS HOT IN CRACKTOWN by Buddy Giovinazzo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 1993

"Bold songs of the street—not for the squeamish—in the honorable tradition of Donald Goines and Iceberg Slim."
Scratch a city and find its ghetto; scratch its ghetto and find the cesspool of drugs, disease, and despair that first-time author Giovinazzo, a filmmaker, limns in these 16 harsh yet potent vignettes. Read full book review >
SILENT CLOSE No. 6 by Monika Maron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 27, 1993

"Relentlessly somber, rife with ambiguity, and with the day of the funeral used as a recurring theme, this is a bleak, biting reminder that the old Communist order has fallen but that its long shadow remains."
Winner of the 1992 Kleist Prize, the latest novel from Maron (Flight of Ashes, 1986, etc.) continues to probe the grim, repressed world of East Germany under Communist domination, this time from the perspective of a battered survivor. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >