Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1768)

THE RECONSTRUCTION by Claudia Casper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1997

"An unusual, unprettified, and ultimately haunting character portrait."
Vancouver writer Casper's bleak but compelling debut depicts a sculptor's breakdown and recovery while she is constructing a model of a human ancestor. Read full book review >
PEOPLE OF THE SILENCE by Kathleen O’Neal Gear
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 1997

"More of the same, but with respectable anthropological underpinnings. (Author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Big trouble in Talon Town, the name given by the archaeologically correct Gears (People of the Lightning, 1995, etc.) to a political and cultural center of the 12th-century Anasazi people in what is now New Mexico. Read full book review >

WILLY SLATER'S LANE by Mitch Wieland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 1997

"A modest mixture of Sherwood Anderson and Erskine Caldwell, with some perfectly observed characters in a narrative that is winningly sweet without being sentimental."
Charming, upbeat first novel set in Ohio. Read full book review >
ONLY TWICE I'VE WISHED FOR HEAVEN by Dawn Turner Trice
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Trice's greatest achievement may be how effortlessly (and modestly) she manages to mingle an original vision and real art."
Chicago Tribune editor Trice brings a light touch of magical realism to this moving tale of violence, urban squalor, and upward mobility among the African-Americans who live in two distinct Chicago neighborhoods during the '70s. Read full book review >
LETTING LOOSE THE HOUNDS by Brady Udall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"He remains a writer worth watching. (Author tour)"
Eleven polished stories, a few of which have appeared in GQ and Playboy, that insist on their rawness and grit but seem to involve lots of writing-school posturing about cowboy life out in Utah, Texas, and Arizona. Read full book review >

GONE FISHIN' by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"No mystery, but a densely imagined prologue that goes a long way toward explaining why Easy spends so much of his adult life hamstrung by his deepest loyalties, as if every friendship were a life sentence."
Fans of Easy Rawlins who worry that he's been growing old too fast—Mosley's five novels from Devil in a Blue Dress (1990) to A Little Yellow Dog (p. 565) have carried him from 1948 to 1963—will be happy to have this prequel set in 1939, a slender coming-of-age story that takes Easy and his violent friend Raymond (Mouse) Alexander from their boyhood home in Houston's Fifth Ward to the aptly named town of Pariah, where Mouse plans to squeeze money out of his stepfather, Reese Corn, to underwrite his marriage to his sweetheart EttaMae. Read full book review >
SKIN DEEP, BLOOD RED by Robert E. Skinner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"It's Farrell's own explosive situation, in fact, that rescues this procession of insubstantial tough guys and tougher janes who'd otherwise flicker into momentary life and be gone in a puff of smoke."
Shady New Orleans nightclub owner Wesley Farrell is an ex- janitor, ex-handyman, ex-boxer, and ex-Negro. Read full book review >
THE ERROR OF OUR WAYS by David Carkeet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Witty, good-natured, and completely convincing: Carkeet has managed, with sympathy and charm, to trace the exceptional adventures of an utterly ordinary man."
The sorrows of Job are visited upon a St. Read full book review >
WHITE WIDOW by Jim Lehrer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A childish and embarrassing work."
PBS newscaster Lehrer (Last Debate, 1995, etc.) gives us, in his tenth novel, all the reason a man could need for keeping clear of road trips with mysterious women. Read full book review >
ANDORRA by Peter Cameron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"While the pace occasionally lags toward the climax, Cameron's sly, complex characters, wonderfully intelligent dialogue, and masterful pacing combine to create a cumulatively powerful tale of the unforgiving workings of fate. (First printing of 25,000; author tour)"
A precise, unsettling (if somewhat overlong) study of loss and duplicity. Read full book review >
DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN by Thomas Mallon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

The famous headline declaring Truman defeated by Dewey inspires Mallon's (Henry and Clara, 1994, etc.) old-fashioned look into the lives of a handful of the residents of Thomas E. Dewey's hometown of Owosso (pop. 16,000), Michigan. Read full book review >
NEW YEAR'S EVE by Lisa Grunwald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A haunting rites-of-passage novel that, despite the required suspension of disbelief, is both profound and life-affirming. (First serial to Good Housekeeping; Literary Guild alternate selection)"
A beguiling contemporary tale with a supernatural subtext features a family confronting, and then accepting, all those universal heartaches—a child's death, a parent's decline—that can visit even the most functional. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 3, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >