Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

THE SNAKE, THE CROCODILE AND THE DOG by Elizabeth Peters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1992

"Dare one hope for less self-indulgence and a stricter discipline in number eight?"
Victorian age archaeologists Amelia Peabody and autocratic husband Emerson Radcliffe are on yet another dig in Egypt, this time without formidable teenaged son Ramses, left hack in England along with Nefret, the young girl brought out of the desert in secret circumstances during the last expedition (The Last Camel Died at Noon). Read full book review >
THE SILKEN WEB by Sandra Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 1992

A first hardcover of a novel that was available for a short time ten years ago—published then, as Brown (French Silk, p. 267, etc.) tells us, under the pseudonym of Laura Jordan. Read full book review >

THE HIDDEN LAW by Michael Nava
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 1992

"But his characters remain exemplary—from the sensitive, heroic Henry to his AIDS-infected former companion, Josh, to the new man in his life, Lonnie."
When State Senator Gus Pe§a, supposedly turning over a new leaf after a month drying out at clinic, is gunned down as he's leaving a restaurant, it appears that Michael Ruiz, a teenage addict who confessed to his therapist at the same clinic that he wanted to murder Pe§a, put action to his words. Read full book review >
ET TU, BABE by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 1992

"When Saturday Night Live loses its luster, open this book. Open it anywhere."
Leyner's follow-up to My Cousin, My Gastroenterologist (1990), which achieved a kind of cult status, is both less and more: Once again it's a pop-culture collage with Leyner at center stage doing a series of stand-up routines, but it's also like a pimple that Leyner decided to show off simply because it appeared on his face. Read full book review >
RATTLESNAKE FARMING by Kathryn Kramer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 1992

"Kramer's constant invocation of Christian myth adds nothing to this humorless, tone-deaf work."
Interminable, pointlessly tangled novels have become Kramer's trademark: this second novel—about the tribulations of an American family—repeats all the flaws of her first (Handbook for Visitors from Outer Space, 1984). Read full book review >

ARCADIA by Jim Crace
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 1992

"Read this for its story, and you'll feel shortchanged; read it for its rich texture, with influences running the gamut from Robert Browning to speculative fiction, and you'll feel amply rewarded."
The British Crace maintains his reputation as a bold fabulist with this third novel (Continent; The Gift of Stones) about urban man nourished by fictions of his rural past. Read full book review >
FLYING INTO LOVE by D.M. Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 1992

"Offensive, simple-minded, and only for fans of gross cartoon."
There's hardly a serious theme that Thomas (Summit, 1988; Lying Together, 1990, etc.) can't make hackwork out of— psychoanalysis, Russian literature, and now the Kennedy assassination. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A very fine collection of writings whether one is a Vietnam buff or not. (Ten photographs by Lance Woodruff.)"
Outstanding, multifaceted collection of writings on Vietnam. Read full book review >
THE CALL OF THE TOAD by GÅnter Grass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Spun like a jazz solo, the book seems a lot more casual than you later realize it is—which is one of its choicest pleasures."
An aging German art-historian, Alexander Reschke, meets a Polish woman, Alexandra Piatkowska, a fine-arts re-gilder, at an outdoor flower-stall in Gdask, Poland (once Danzig). Read full book review >
THE WAKING SPELL by Carol Dawson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A nearly perfect first novel—courageous, revelatory, and, in the end, deeply moving."
First fiction that explores the simmering rage passed through four generations of emotionally stunted southern ``ladies''—an unusually confident and original debut that unveils the spiritual anesthetization behind the gracious feminine smile. Read full book review >
NO MAN IN THE HOUSE by Cecil Foster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A remarkable debut."
A first novel from Barbadian-born Foster, published first in Canada and now making its US debut: one of those rare books that do indeed celebrate indomitable characters and the resilience of the human spirit. Read full book review >
STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON by Ricardo Cortez Cruz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Raging energy and cruel humor: so up-to-the-minute it's hard to judge its lasting power, but an explosive package for 1992."
A rap, jive, and video-inflected hallucination of the L.A. black ghetto, winner of the 1992 Nilon Award for minority fiction: a violent, slangy, tour-de-force debut. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >