Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

HERE'S YOUR HAT WHAT'S YOUR HURRY by Elizabeth McCracken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 2, 1993

"An able apprentice Raymond Carver—interesting, but not to everyone's taste."
If the title of McCracken's first collection leads you to expect romantic comedy or even a light touch, forget it; this James A. Michener-award-winning author's characters are outcasts, and their lives are grim indeed. Read full book review >
THE GENIUS OF DESIRE by Brian Bouldrey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Still, Bouldrey, and the reader, have a bit of fun with the story and the secondary characters, even if the narrator, coming-of-age as he comes out, takes himself all too seriously."
Growing up gay in an extended Catholic family—in a first novel that, despite a self-congratulatory tone and a narrator who too often justifies himself without irony, makes for a credible eulogy to a long-lost age. ``At first I didn't even know that my prime lusts were of an aberrant kind,'' says Michael Bellman, who spends his quality time as a youngster in Monsalvat, Michigan, among a family that includes great-grandmother Kaiser and her six children—grandfather John, uncles James and Thomas, Aunt Teresa, and the sisters Charlene and Charlotta. Read full book review >

THE OBJECT LESSON by Jordan Orlando
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Interesting for Orlando's skill at duplicating realistic dialogue, but a long-winded, difficult read that is just too late for the brat pack bus."
Newcomer Orlando's overlong, ultimately unrewarding look into the dark past of the 1981 graduating class of an exclusive Manhattan prep school. Read full book review >
JUST THIS ONCE by Scott French
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"The computer weenies have been trying to tell us for years, garbage in—garbage out."
A stunning Vassar graduate, a stunning School of Hard Knocks graduate, a handsome Stanford graduate, and a stunning gay man climb to the heights of Las Vegas and sink to the depths of Hollywood—coupling, snorting coke, and spouting clichÇs along the way. Read full book review >
ARABIAN JAZZ by Diana Abu-Jaber
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"The other elements in this mishmash (visiting Jordanians on a credit-card rampage, poor whites tormenting themselves with coathangers and booze) only add to the confusion."
You're an Arab-American writing about your community in your first novel. Read full book review >

THE UNFINISHED by Jay B. Laws
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Given the genre, a good read—and the themes based on gay love and AIDS add an undercurrent of real feeling."
AIDS horror fantasy by Laws, who died at 34, of an AIDS- related illness, a week after completing final changes on the manuscript. Read full book review >
A RIVER SUTRA by Gita Mehta
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Subtle profundity in a beautifully evoked setting—and powerfully understated."
A deceptively simple second novel from author-filmmaker Mehta (Raj, 1989) that—with gentle good humor—addresses an age-old big subject: the workings of the human heart. Read full book review >
WHERE OR WHEN by Anita Shreve
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Love, lust, and redemption all too quickly reduced to sinners who must pay for their sins—but, still, a seductive parable with great mood music."
Shreve, who mixed up such a potent brew of love and tragedy in her earlier Eden Close (1989) and Strange Fits of Passion (1991), serves us something else here—slightly sweeter but also thinner, something that for all its fizz feels flat by the end. Read full book review >
DEATH COMES AS EPIPHANY by Sharan Newman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Like the author's Guinevere trilogy (Guinevere Evermore, 1985, etc.), this offers a most likable heroine who wears well in the stretch."
Medieval mystery and murder, travel and travail, in 1139 France—as a spunky, sensible, determined novice nun joins forces with a sculptor's apprentice to uncover some evil doings. Read full book review >
HOW I CAME WEST, AND WHY I STAYED by Alison Baker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Other pieces here are shapeless or cutesy, but the best are luminous with verbal play and intimations of how ordinary strangeness can be. (Some have appeared in Atlantic, the Best of the West, New Stories from the South and various lit mags.)"
A first collection of stories with great first lines, usually followed by fictions as light as air—some antic or absurd, others delicate or touching. Read full book review >
FULL-BODIED RED by Bruce Zimmerman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Quinn is as good company as ever: it's a pleasure running one step ahead of him all the way to the final payoff."
Bad news for Bay Area phobia therapist Quinn Parker (Blood Under the Bridge, 1989; Thicker Than Water, 1991): his agoraphobic client Phillip Chesterton, winery heir, has vanished; Phillip's bearish stepfather Frank Matson is convinced Quinn knows where he is; and the morning after Quinn and Matson duke it out, Matson disappears himself and the police take on the job of suspecting Quinn. Read full book review >
THE FORMS OF WATER by Andrea Barrett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Strong currents, clear writing, but a crew of characters that misses the boat."
Barrett (The Middle Kingdom, 1991, etc.) returns with her specialty—a story about the tangled web of a family told in prose that's spun smooth as silk. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jenny Han
July 6, 2015

In Jenny Han’s P.S. I Still Love You, Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? In this charming and heartfelt sequel to the New York Times bestseller To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, we see first love through the eyes of the unforgettable Lara Jean. Love is never easy, but maybe that’s part of makes it so amazing. View video >