Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

I, LUCIFER by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Duncan has comic energy to spare but no clear idea of what to do with it. The result reads like a promising first draft."
The Devil is on vacation, sampling life in London and reflecting on some of his career highlights, in this grab bag from the British Duncan (first US publication). Read full book review >
THE WAGES OF GENIUS by Gregory Mone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Relativity for the Common Man meets an average modern-office novel."
Debut that tries to ask what's happened to the pursuit of genius in corporate America. Read full book review >

THIS WILD SILENCE by Lucy Jane Bledsoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Some marvelously rendered sketches of domestic torment and grief are lost in a rambling and largely unfocussed narrative—and the denouement comes so much out of nowhere that it falls flat."
Disappointingly tame fare from the talented Bledsoe (Cougar Canyon, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >
MAN ABOUT TOWN by Mark Merlis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"A small tale about an ordinary man—though one with unusual resonance for gay men who've outgrown 'the scene.'"
When his partner of 15 years leaves him, middle-aged gay Joel Lingeman is forced to come to terms with his past fantasies and reexamine things as they are. Read full book review >
THE WHITE RUSSIAN by Tom Bradby
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Not especially distinctive or memorable in its style or point of view, but, still, consistently engaging and enjoyable."
A skillfully plotted and atmospheric thriller set in Russia in 1917, as the currents of revolution swirl about St. Petersburg. Read full book review >

BEST FRIENDS by Thomas Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Nobody writes them like Thomas Berger. Not to be missed."
This trim, mordant 22nd by the author forever identified with his classic Little Big Man (1964) is one more of the surprises that have cropped up throughout Berger's matchless 50-year career. Read full book review >
SOMEBODY’S KNOCKING AT MY DOOR by Francis Ray
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Well-meaning soap, riddled with clichés."
A veteran paperback author returns with another earnest romance (I Know Who Tomorrow Holds<\I>, not reviewed; co-contributor, Winter Nights<\I>, 1998). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Though occasionally more generous with detail than is good for narrative momentum, Boyne (The Two O'Clock War, 2000, etc.), does the novelist's job well—converting the iconic brothers into appealingly quirky humans."
The stirring story of the Wright Brothers, plus a colorful supporting cast of high-flyers during the baby-step era of aviation, entertainingly presented—warts and all. Read full book review >
KISSING YOU by Daniel Hayes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"It's the approach here that varies rather than the theme. Still, a wide sampling from a promising talent."
A first collection of ten stories that explore modern romance and physical intimacy in a variety of styles and approaches, most often discovering a love that feels ancient. Read full book review >
BAD NEWS OF THE HEART by Douglas Glover
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 2003

"Sad, sexy, and significant."
A dozen stories, culled from collections first published in Canada, that straddle the line between sadness and sadism. Read full book review >
THE NAVIGATION LOG by Martin Corrick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 2003

"A little too pat and intermittently predictable to qualify for Masterpiece Theater. But the BBC should be quick to snap it up."
An immensely readable debut, a kind of British Rich Man, Poor Man, set during the early days of the Battle of Britain. Read full book review >
THE PAINTER by Will Davenport
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 2003

"Although the contemporary story becomes an annoying distraction, Davenport does right by Rembrandt and his genius—and that gives his fantasy a glow of its own."
Rembrandt in England, locked in a fierce struggle with the poet Andrew Marvell for artistic preeminence—and the attentions of a beautiful woman: all in this outing from Davenport (a.k.a. British thriller writer James Long: Silence and Shadows, 2001, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >