Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

SO SHALL YOU REAP by Marilyn Wallace
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"Readers who've been comparing Wallace (A Single Stone, etc.) to Mary Higgins Clark will have to find a more resonant model for this likely Edgar contender."
The cozy, inbred New York hamlet of Taconic Hills, celebrating its bicentennial by staging a pageant of its early history, is beset by a series of disturbingly literal echoes of that history: its spiritual leader dead of exposure after getting lost in a snowstorm; the unexplained spoiling of a vat of milk; a dog dead of a mysterious three-point wound; a cannon's fatal explosion. Read full book review >
VOYAGE OF THE DEVILFISH by Michael DiMercurio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"There's a hefty glossary at the end, but DiMercurio's action needs no technical assistance."
Last-gasp cold war hostilities provide an American submarine commander the opportunity to avenge his father's death. Read full book review >

THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

"Pity the price tag has left orbit and was last seen heading for Mars."
Another mammoth and eclectic collection of 44 tales and six poems drawn from 1991's short-format output. Read full book review >
SHARES by Richard Stern
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"But just about every hue of human anxiety uncommonly finds its own small pattern there, too, and the total effect seems more than the sum of its parts."
Parental advice, its instability and hysterical echoes, figures as a theme in a lot of Stern's fiction (Other Men's Daughters, A Father's Words, etc.)—which in its omnivorous, swarming, compressed, choppy, buzzing stylistics sometimes seems itself like a species of advice trying to camouflage itself as reality. Read full book review >
CRY OF THE HAWK by Terry C. Johnston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"In his fast-paced but uneven latest, Johnston (Carry the Wind, 1982, etc.) magnifies the violence and stench of the Old West."
Western potboiler that will stain the reader with grease, blood, and smoke. Read full book review >

PLAN B FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS by Ron Carlson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"Bland stuff."
Carlson (The News of the World, 1987; Truants, 1981; Betrayed by F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1977) writes stories in High Workshop Style: odd frameworks, scant forward motion, pearled with mundane perceptions of gladness and gloom that all come across as post- adolescent: ``I love to fly,'' the narrator of the title story confides—``I always sit in the window and press the corner of my forehead against the plastic glass. Read full book review >
DESTRUCTION AT NOONDAY by Bill Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"An old-fashioned story of modest heroics told in an old- fashioned Nevil Shute style that suits it perfectly."
A Canadian ocean liner becomes an island of safety during the earthquake that destroyed Yokohama in 1923. Read full book review >
CROSSED WIRES by John E. Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 1992

"Routine stuff, then, with perhaps some appeal for modem mavens."
First-novelist Simpson's come up with a nifty premise for a detective story: A hearing-impaired government researcher known simply as Finley, who feels comfortable and secure only with the friends she talks to via her computer keyboard, investigates a series of throat- slashings by finding out which bulletin boards the victims had logged onto. Read full book review >
NIGHT BUTTERFLY by Patricia McFall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"The fanciful plot strains belief, but McFall renders Japanese customs, manners, mores, etc., with much charm."
A first mystery in which Japanese gangsters, the CIA, and an American linguistics student, who's earning her fare home as a hostess at the Club Chocho, lead each other a lively chase—a chase that moves from Tokyo to Kyoto and back again. Read full book review >
FALSE PROFITS by David Everson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"Lumpen prose but an interesting premise—Lincoln's culpability—and although the Church of the Latter-day Saints has been rendered better (the Moroni Traveller series), this is a step up from Everson's last outing."
Bobby Miles, low-tech Springfield, Illinois, p.i. Read full book review >
FLIGHT by Fran Dorf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"Overlong and overladen with flashbacks to the Sixties, but powerfully imagined throughout—a mostly successful stretch from the author of A Reasonable Madness (1990)."
Twenty years after a plunge from an upstate cliff near Woodstock, 40-ish Lana Paluka emerges from a catatonic state to deny that Ethan Skitt—the sullen boyfriend convicted of attempted murder—could have wanted to push her. Read full book review >
MEETING IN INFINITY by John Kessel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1992

"Of course the converse is true, too."
Fourteen speculative stories, 1981-92, from the author of Good News from Outer Space, (1989), with the emphasis on allegory and unlikely juxtapositions rather than ideas or invention. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >