Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

THE MIDNIGHT HOUR by Karen Robards
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1999

"Decently done work in the genre of the —now— romance."
Psychos lurking in the dark, steamy sex, and touches of the supernatural seem to be favored ingredients of romances these days, and Robards handles them better than most. Read full book review >
THE HEALER by Greg Hollingshead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 10, 1999

"Ought to be read with latex gloves."
Canadian Hollingshead (stories: The Roaring Girl, 1997) goes soft and mushy on us with this first novel about a wounded man's search for the healing touch. —With Caroline Troyer I didn—t know what I was getting into.— That's how Tim Wakelin sees it, with hindsight. Read full book review >

LOYAL DISLOYALTY by Jeffrey Ashford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"It's only when the police step in that things get predictable."
Someone is using a series of stolen dogs to lure unsuspecting women into the back of his car and rape them, and the someone is stuffy parvenu Thomas Walker-Jones, who owns Royal Motors and secretly has an interest in a convenient wrecking company called Jones and Son as well. Read full book review >
AFTERSHOCKS by Richard S. Wheeler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"Wheeler writes to entertain, and he succeeds admirably in his task."
Following up on his long series of popular Westerns, Wheeler (Buffalo Commons, 1998; Flint's Truth, 1998; etc.) jumps ahead a few years to the San Francisco earthquake. Read full book review >
MARA AND DANN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"She isn't a stylist, and she takes no prisoners, but this writer remains one of contemporary fiction's genuine thinkers and visionaries, and it would be folly to ignore her."
Lessing's 22nd novel, a dystopian allegory set in "Ifrik" (formerly Africa) thousands of years hence, is a ponderous, hectoring, fascinating second cousin to her Memoirs of a Survivor (1975) and The Four-Gated City (1969) (and quite reminiscent, incidentally, of Norman Mailer's similarly forbidding Ancient Evenings). Read full book review >

THIRTEENTH NIGHT by Alan Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"For most others, a test of endurance."
It's early in the 13th century, and hidden away in the Dolomites is a village that's home to the Guildhall, an academy for jesters, jugglers, magicians, etc.—a School for Fools. Read full book review >
FOUR CORNERS OF NIGHT by Craig Holden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1999

"What gives this one distinction is the interesting commentary he has to make about male friendship—both how it works and about the way it can hurt men. (Author tour)"
A veteran cop questions his fitness for the work he's in as this action-packed, multilayered suspenser gets underway. Read full book review >
THREE-LEGGED HORSE by Cheng Ch'ing-wen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1999

"More of Cheng's fiction would be welcome."
An appealing empathy with the fates of embattled "little people" distinguishes this fine collection of twelve stories (from a forty-year oeuvre of nearly two hundred) by a popular Taiwanese author only now appearing in English translation. Read full book review >
THE DREAM MISTRESS by Jenny Diski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1999

"An elaborate tale, finding humor in the odd corners created when what's real and what isn't converge: a story that both disturbs and delights."
From the inventive, darkly acerbic, cunningly erotic Diski (Monkey's Uncle, 1995; an acclaimed memoir, Skating to Antarctica, 1998; etc.) comes this story of the chance encounter of a mother and daughter, long apart, who pass mutually unrecognized but are nonetheless affected by what transpires. Read full book review >
SINS OF THE FATHERS by John Blackthorn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 1999

"What he lacks is the savvy storyteller's abililty to invent people who can make the backgrounds come alive."
Castro-haters plot to nuke Fidel in this less-than-explosive suspenser. Read full book review >
STARDUST by Neil Gaiman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 1999

"Wonderful stuff, for kids of all ages."
The multitalented author of The Sandman graphic novels and last year's Neverwhere charms again, with a deftly written fantasy adventure tale set in early Victorian England and enriched by familiar folk materials. Read full book review >
BLUEBOTTLE by James Sallis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 1999

"Some good writing, a few strong scenes, but a story woefully underplotted, determinedly nonlinear, and as tricky to catch hold of as, say, a frightened fly."
Black detective Lew Griffin, who stars in this insect-named series (The Eye of the Cricket, 1997, etc.), begins his fifth adventure comatose. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >