Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

TARGETS OF OPPORTUNITY by Joe Weber
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"Weber (also Shadow Flight and Defcon One) continues to write great flight scenes for the boys—and, for the girls, some of the most wretched dialogue in the war-thriller biz, where competition for wretched dialogue is tough."
The story of Marine flier Brad Austin that began with Rules of Engagement (1991) now puts him in the cockpit of the CIA's latest weapon, a Soviet built MiG fighter. Read full book review >
TESTIMONY by Frank Palmer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"A first novel with maybe too many subplots for comfort or belief, but a finale worthy of Ruth Rendell."
Even after Terry Davis was thrown off the Leicester police force, his downward spiral continued through his smarmy private- investigations firm—until he was found bleeding to death outside his favorite pub. Read full book review >

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CAPTAIN N. by Douglas Glover
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"Darkly humorous, simultaneously restless and relentless in its patterning of voices and imagery, this is a close study of individuals trapped by a world in flux: a chaotic view of a new world order from the standpoint of the losers."
The Revolutionary War serves as a seldom-seen but solid foundation for Canadian-born Glover's (The South Will Rise at Noon, 1989, etc.) latest—a foray into some of the conflicting impulses and perspectives swirling through that formative period. Read full book review >
TENEMENT OF CLAY by Paul West
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 19, 1993

"Not a must read, or a fun read, but curiously prophetic of the recent calamitous effects of enforced acculturation in places like united Germany."
A secular savior takes a derelict into his crumbling brownstone with predictably gloomy results—first US publication for this early (1965) novel by the author of The Women of Whitechapel and Jack the Ripper, Lord Byron's Doctor, etc. Edward Nicholas, a.k.a. Read full book review >
INVADING TIBET by Mark Frutkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 1993

"The plotlines don't quite mesh, making for a jerky read; but Frutkin's prose is smooth, and his rare attempt to evoke Buddhist ideas through fiction creates, at times, a palpable sense of cosmic mystery."
The title of Frutkin's venturesome, occasionally awkward first novel is literal as well as ironic: For Edmund Candler, a reporter traveling with a 1904 British expedition into Tibet, finds that it's actually Tibet and its Buddhist ethos that invade him—just as they do Candler's great-great-nephew Alec, who researches Candler's story 80 years later. Read full book review >

FAST SOFA by Bruce Craven
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

No amount of gimmicky packaging can compensate for the essential pointlessness of this first novel—a glib and predictable adolescent male fantasy that rips off Hunter Thompson, ``Wayne's World,'' and Douglas Coupland. Read full book review >
SOMETIMES YOU SEE IT COMING by Kevin Baker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"Barring the Freudian glop, baseball as it's meant to be."
First-time novelist Baker makes it to the playoffs with this neo-mythic entry in a baseball subgenre pioneered by Bernard Malamud (The Natural) and advanced by George Plimpton (The Curious Case of Sidd Finch): the story of the rookie from nowhere who blossoms into the greatest player in the history of the game. Read full book review >
REBEL by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"They hurt."
Cornwell, whose wonderfully entertaining Sharpe series of 18th-century military-sea adventures has entranced readers for years, starts a Civil War series with a great bang. Read full book review >
MORNING TIDE by Neil Gunn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"Purple—yes, a shade, but Gunn's sea is a deep blue, then furious white and mighty and real."
From the late Scottish author Gunn (d. 1973), another novel set in the chillingly pristine and seacoast landscapes (Young Art and Old Hector, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
SLOW WALK IN A SAD RAIN by John P. McAfee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"As fiction, it's well- meaning, occasionally original, but mostly derivative."
A first novel, set at a Special Forces camp in the Laotian jungle, that tries to do for Vietnam what Vonnegut did for WW II, though McAfee's style—one-sentence paragraphs displayed ad nauseam—is merely choppy instead of stoic or absurdist. Read full book review >
ONE DARK BODY by Charlotte Watson Sherman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"Altogether, there is a tedious emphasis on dark souls, dreams, watery wishes, talking trees, and prescient bones and not enough focus on what's for dinner—all this, even so, in a novel of great promise and considerable interest."
A spare and lyrical first novel about African-American rituals of faith carried from slave ships to a town in the Pacific Northwest, and about the universal healing power of love. Read full book review >
PAGAN BABIES by Greg Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1993

"The voices of gossiping schoolgirls reappear throughout Johnson's debut novel and set the tone: the fascinating sense of knowing intimate secrets about someone in spite of having little personal connection."
Johnson's first novel after story collections (Distant Friends; A Friendly Deceit) follows two childhood friends to adulthood; here, unappealing characters engage in part because they seem so real, in part because the author's obvious concern for them rubs off. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >