Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1788)

A REGULAR GUY by Mona Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1996

With a bestselling debut (Anywhere But Here, 1987) followed by a shaky sequel (The Lost Father, 1991), Simpson has a lot riding on her latest effort—which proves to be a challenging but less-than- riveting saga of a girl who finally meets her larger-than-life father but has difficulty getting his attention. Read full book review >
THE SILVER CLOUD CAFê by Jr. Véa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1996

"Too crowded with incident for its own good but, still, a moving work."
An ambitious, energetic, overlong but passionate novel about fate, hope, and faith, by the author of the acclaimed La Maravilla (1993). Read full book review >

THE BOOK OF CANDY by Susan W. Dworkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1996

"High spirits, a cast of thousands: a near-miss."
This fast-paced novel of Jewish manners by former Ms. magazine contributing editor and film-industry watcher Dworkin (Double De Palma, 1984, etc.; and Stolen Goods, a novel, 1987) starts out funny, grows passionate, complex, and ambitious, and ends on a tame, bitter note that leaves the reader wondering what all the fuss has been about. Read full book review >
ZEENA by Elizabeth Cooke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 1996

"But this version gains much of its resonance from a knowledge of that original text, and those unfamiliar with Ethan Frome may find the few months described in the novel to be as long as a New England winter."
Recent fiction, enamored with the endless possibilities of second servings, offers another in the genre: a new take on Edith Wharton's classic Ethan Frome. Read full book review >
THE PRESTIGE by Christopher Priest
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 1996

"Electrifying effects and a deft handling of mysteries and their explanations (some remaining tantalizingly incomplete) in an unexpectedly compelling fusion of weird science and legerdemain."
After a ten-year hiatus, Priest (The Glamour, 1985, etc.) returns in strength with a taut, twisting, prize-winning story of two magicians and their fierce fin-de-siäcle rivalry that taints successive generations of their respective families. Read full book review >

THE NOTEBOOK by Nicholas Sparks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 1996

"Destined, positively, for success. (First serial to Good Housekeeping; film rights to New Line Cinema; Literary Guild selection)"
Sparks's debut is a contender in the Robert Waller book-sweeps for most shamelessly sentimental love story, with honorable mention for highest octane schmaltz throughout an extended narrative. Read full book review >
A CONDOR BRINGS THE SUN by Jerry McGahan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1996

"Far-fetched, then, though pleasant and diverting."
First novel spinning a love story around ecological themes, set in the Peruvian Andes and Montana. Read full book review >
SHROUD FOR THE ARCHBISHOP by Peter Tremayne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1996

"The diffuse plotting, rarely compelling, suffocates under the onslaught."
A second chapter in the seventh-century exploits of intelligent, highly educated Sister Fidelma of the Celtic Church in Ireland, aided as before by Brother Eadulf of Canterbury (Absolution by Murder, 1996). Read full book review >
YOU'RE SO BEAUTIFUL by Eileen FitzGerald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1996

"FitzGerald's reach doesn't exceed her grasp, and she nicely animates the small sphere of life that she offers us."
First-timer FitzGerald gives us ten stories of life among the young, the innocent, and the merely naive in this appealing and understated look at midwestern domesticity. Read full book review >
THE NIGHT IN QUESTION by Tobias Wolff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 1996

"Understatement, irony, and surprising juxtapositions are the key ingredients of these generally accomplished and resonant fictions—the best of which are certainly among the most accomplished being written in our time. (First printing of 30,000)"
A surprisingly uneven assemblage that, nevertheless, hits several astonishing highs. Read full book review >
GOOD HAIR by Benilde Little
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 8, 1996

"Little's thematic reach exceeds her literary grasp by a mile, and her novel—part personal journalism, part sociological tract, part shopping guide for the socially mobile—intrigues but doesn't fulfill."
Former Essence magazine arts-and-entertainment editor Little offers an uneven first novel about a contemporary African-American relationship set among elite black professional circles in New York. Read full book review >
SEVEN MOVES by Carol Anshaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 1996

"Clever, well-crafted, and deft: Anshaw draws her characters with an unsparing hand that is guided by a remarkably sympathetic eye. (Author tour)"
A pleasantly ambiguous psychological-suspense novel from Anshaw (the award-winning Aquamarine, 1991), who shows us once again that a good story can be told as much by what it holds back as by what it offers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >