Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

VOICE OF THE EAGLE by Linda Lay Shuler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 21, 1992

"The Way Things Were over New Mexico way. (Literary Guild Dual Selection for Summer)"
An assiduously researched sequel to Shuler's She Who Remembers (1991), again spotlighting Kwani, an Anasazi woman of the 13th century in what is now New Mexico. Read full book review >
THE DRUMMER WAS THE FIRST TO DIE by Liza Pennywitt Taylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 20, 1992

"Taylor's portrayal of foggy, gloomy Victorian London is superb, but her characters' thickheadedness makes for a frustrating and unsatisfying thriller."
It's an interesting idea—Taylor, a UCLA immunology researcher and 1991-92 Pushcart Prize nominee, creating a Victorian-era medical thriller as her novelistic debut. Read full book review >

STEEL BEACH by John Varley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"Once a prodigious talent, Varley has subsided into an overblown, obfuscatory mode that will disappoint all but his most ardent fans."
Imitative 23rd-century lunar ruling-computer-goes-mad yarn from the author of, most recently, Blue Champagne (1986). Read full book review >
IT'S ONLY LOVE by Linda Cashdan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"Familiar cast and ethnic tintypes but, still, sweet and sunny."
The author of Special Interests (1990) returns with a sentimental, happily clichÇd, cheerful—and likable—love story. Read full book review >
PRESSURE POINT by Dick Couch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"For maximum effect, read while commuting."
Palestinian terrorists hijack a Puget Sound ferry and use it to swipe a nuclear submarine—in an unusually imaginative first hardcover from a Navy SEAL veteran and former CIA employee. Read full book review >

SIBERIAN TRANSFER by Hans Herlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"An intriguing, well-researched story that never really warms up and runs fast enough."
Herlin returns to the revolutionary Russia of his earlier Grishin (1987) for a thriller about a trainload of Czarist gold bullion and an English effort to thwart the Bolsheviks. Read full book review >
HONEST ILLUSIONS by Nora Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"Good escape reading."
Suspenseful, glamorous story of love, blackmail, and magic, set in New Orleans and Washington, D.C., about a family of high-class magicians practicing the time-honored profession of thievery. Read full book review >
BLUES FOR A BLACK CAT by Boris Vian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"As well rendered by Julia Older, this Vian sampler—in its first English translation—is just about a perfect dose for reintroduction of this attractively inconsequential but easy-to- take, classically bohemian figure."
Jazz musician, translator of American hard-boiled detective fiction, librettist, pataphysician, Vian (1920-59) was a sort of anti-Camus: an outlaw, a rebel, a dashingly handsome existentialist cafe-figure, yet also a trickster with the lightest of touches, everything about him made of whimsy and enthusiasm, and hardly a dark shading to be found. Read full book review >
SECOND SON by Stephen Stark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1992

"He should sell a lot of books."
An emotional portrait of a father and son relationship—in a second novel from the author of The Outskirts (1988). Read full book review >
SLOW HAND by Michele Slung
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1992

"Someone should have told Slung to stop making sense."
The best of intentions motivated this collection of original erotic stories by and primarily for women. Read full book review >
SHE'S COME UNDONE by Wally Lamb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1992

"A warmblooded, enveloping tale of survival, done up loose and cheering."
A tremendously likable first novel about the catastrophe- marked childhood, youth, and mangled adulthood of a tough-fibered woman who almost beaches herself in guilt and grief. Read full book review >
KINGPINS by Cynthia Manson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1992

"An average collection at best, no better or worse than a regular issue of either magazine."
Seventeen stories from the pages of Ellery Queen and Alfred Hitchcock magazines, none of them particularly memorable and most not especially relevant to the collection's purported theme— showing the inner workings of organized crime. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >