Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

FOREIGN DEVIL by Wang Ping
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1996

"A litany of horrors faced down by a true-grit heroine, narrated in a fashion too hectic, cool, and distant to be affecting."
Chinese poet and storywriter Wang (American Visa, 1994), based in the US since 1985, offers a vivid if overstuffed debut novel of life and love in Red China. Read full book review >
MURDER AT THE BASEBALL HALL OF FAME by David Daniel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 1996

"Daniel (The Skelly Man, 1995, etc.) and his new teammate Carpenter, a CNN broadcaster, wait till the late innings before their game-winning barrage."
Forget the clunky title—especially since the Hall of Fame is only the first stop on a daisy chain that begins when Boston p.i. Read full book review >

AFTER by Melvin Jules Bukiet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 1996

"Still, despite the longueurs and wildly uneven tone, those who persevere will find a conclusion that is surprisingly earnest, genuinely affecting and, largely because of what has gone before, deeply resonant."
Bukiet (While the Messiah Tarries, 1995, etc.), fiction editor of Tikkun, draws on stories of his own family's survival of the death camps for this corrosive satirical novel of the Holocaust's aftermath. Read full book review >
MANDARIN PLAID by S.J. Rozan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 1996

"Lydia's still an appealing heroine, but this vehicle is plotted within an inch of its life, without the controlling vision that made her first two novels (Concourse, 1995; China Trade, 1994) so provocative."
It sounds like a simple job for Lydia Chin: deliver a $50,000 ransom for the stolen sketches of fledgling designer Genna Jing's initial collection. Read full book review >
RIO GRANDE FALL by Rudolfo Anaya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 1996

"A fascinating hybrid of detective story, adventure yarn, and shamanistic magic that will infuriate some readers (identifying the triggermen in the drug killings turns out to be stunningly mundane) and captivate others."
The killers from Zia Summer (1995) are down but not out. Read full book review >

THE LIONS OF THE NORTH by Edward Marston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"The best by far of this series: abrim with energy, heroism, tenderness, chicanery, and suspense while crisply evoking a vivid picture of the era."
Fourth in the author's Domesday series set in an 11th-century England ruled by William the Conqueror. Read full book review >
I NEVER CAME TO YOU IN WHITE by Judith Farr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"But more problematic here is the sameness of tone suffusing the work and its characters, creating only monochromes where full-color images would be infinitely preferable."
Poet and Dickinson scholar Farr (The Passion of Emily Dickinson, not reviewed) observes her favorite, elusive subject at a crucial stage in her adolescence—her unhappy ten-month stint at Mount Holyoke Seminary—in this well-intended debut. Read full book review >
SNOW ANGEL by Thom Racina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"Lurid, unbelievable, and thoroughly tedious."
A second novel from Racina (The Great L.A. Blizzard, 1977) offers a busily plotted tale of obsessive love run nastily amok. Read full book review >
WHAT KEEPS ME HERE by Rebecca Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"Her tales match a highly original imagination with style and intelligence. (Author tour)"
Brown has published novels and short fiction, but her special strength seems to be the short story, as this, her third collection (The Gifts of the Body, 1994, etc.), suggests. Read full book review >
BACHELOR BROTHERS' BED AND BREAKFAST by Bill Richardson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1996

"By and large, a collection of cloying cuteness and failed wit."
Broadcaster Richardson, billed as Canada's Garrison Keillor, suffers from the literary humorist's bane: He shoots for whimsy, but ends up wallowing in clichÇ. Read full book review >
IT'S NOT A PRETTY SIGHT by Gar Anthony Haywood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1996

"Gunner (You Can Die Trying, 1993) knows everybody who's anybody, and even more people who aren't, and his tour of the battered-wives scene is the high point of this eventful but slackly told story."
After a three-year vacation while Haywood introduced the zany Loudermilk family (Bad News Travels Fast, 1995, etc.), his main man, L.A. shamus Aaron Gunner, is back on the job. Read full book review >
PAGAN'S FATHER by Michael Arditti
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1996

"Force-feeding a message, no matter how laudable, makes it distinctly unpalatable; the problem is compounded here by a tale told at excessive length, featuring a protagonist almost unbelievably pure of heart."
Tackling a worthy subject, but with a long-winded polemic loosely disguised as a novel, British writer Arditti explores the question of proper parenting in a knock-down, drag-out custody battle between a child's legal but gay guardian and her grandparents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marilu Henner
author of CHANGING NORMAL
April 26, 2016

After they’d been dating only a short while, and as they were falling in love, Marilu Henner and Michael Brown were hit with the ultimate bad news: Michael was diagnosed with cancer. Refusing traditional care, they pieced together a personal and holistic view on battling his cancer, all while forging an unbreakable bond. In this moving and informative book, Marilu pulls back the curtain on how they dealt with the blow. She relates her holistic perspective on health—including the superfoods, exercises, and immunotherapy they used to fight back—and why a diagnosis doesn’t have to be the end of romance or of a happy and fulfilling life. “An inspiring love story wrapped in a serious call for new ways to treat disease,” our reviewer writes. View video >