Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

BATTLE CREEK by Scott Lasser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Featuring a desultory text strewn with faceless women in perky T-shirts who mostly serve drinks, Lasser's debut has as much spellbinding crackle as a pre-season rainout. (Book-of-the-Month Club selection; author tour)"
A tepid first novel for boys who love the boys of summer. Read full book review >
CONDITIONS OF LOVE by Ruth Pennebaker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Although the story offers no real surprises, the author's amusing first-person account and eye for detail keep the narrative consistently engaging; setting Pennebaker's novel apart from the pack is the very specific behaviors and warty humanness of the adroitly drawn characters. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Sarah's hard-drinking, charismatic father has been dead for close to a year when this aptly titled novel from Pennebaker (Don't Think Twice, 1996, etc.) opens. Read full book review >

ELEANOR RUSHING by Patty Friedmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Depressing overall, but curiously affecting: Friedmann writes with a sensitivity that can touch the heart without falling prey to the sentimental. (First printing of 25,000; author tour)"
A lugubrious but moving account of a disturbed young woman's troubled childhood and adolescence, by New Orleans second-novelist Friedmann (The Exact Image of Mother, 1991). Read full book review >
KING by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"Spare and dreamlike, yet for all its delicacy harshly real: a story that opens a window on a world easily ignored, and makes its case long after the last page is turned."
As usual from Berger (Isabelle, 1998, etc.), a deceptively simple tale—here, about a day in the life of a homeless couple and their German Shepard, on whom they rely—turns into a thing of eloquence and beauty, with tragedy and humanity evident in equal measure. Read full book review >
THE MIGRATION OF GHOSTS by Pauline Melville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 1999

"An irresistible book and a fine introduction, for those who need one, to one of the best new writers on the international scene."
Twelve colorful and intriguingly exotic stories from the British-Guyanese author of Shape-Shifter (a first collection, 1991) and the highly praised novel The Ventriloquist's Tale (1998). Read full book review >

THE BASIC EIGHT by Daniel Handler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 1999

"Discuss."
An adult young-adult first novel set in a San Francisco high school. Read full book review >
NEBULA AWARDS 33 by Connie Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 1999

"Terrific fiction, a Bronx cheer for the nonfiction."
paper 0-15-600601-4 Nebula's 1997 award-winners and ballot finalists are presented by Willis, who takes over from last year's editor, Jack Dann. Read full book review >
FAMOUS AFTER DEATH by Benjamin Cheever
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 1999

"Hilarious and just bad-natured enough to be cruel (that is, accurate) in its satire of modern greed and modern fame: an across- the-board winner."
John Cheever's son (The Partisan, 1994, etc.) follows in the footsteps, if not quite in the spirit, of his father in this witty send-up of politics, publishing, and crime—and of the synergy they generate on really good days. Read full book review >
THE EMPEROR'S GENERAL by James Webb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 1999

"Despite a lumbering opening and some plummy prose, Webb (Something to Die For, 1991, etc.) makes winning the Japanese peace look every bit as challenging and tragic as winning the war. (film rights to Scott Rudin/Paramount; Book-of-the-Month Club selection; $150,000 ad/promo budget; author tour)"
A worm's-eye fable of how Machiavellian General Douglas MacArthur, having won the war in the Pacific, goes on to wage peace against his subtle former adversaries. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF HAPPINESS by Nina Berberova
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 27, 1999

A novel set in Paris in the 1920s, from the late Russian author (1901—93) whose plaintive novellas were collected in The Tattered Cloak (1991) and The Ladies of St. Read full book review >
WINTER HOURS by Mary Oliver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 27, 1999

"All in all, a pompous, pleasant ragbag."
NBA" and Pulitzer—winning Oliver takes a pedantic turn with this new collection of poetry, prose, and essays. Read full book review >
THE SPELL by Alan Hollinghurst
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 26, 1999

"A near miss: Hollinghurst can do better. (Book-of-the-Month selection)"
Like The Swimming Pool Library (1988) and The Folding Star (1994), Hollinghurst's third attempts an ambitious exploration of gay male experiences and relationships. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >