Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

THE MINISTRY OF HOPE by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"On all counts, a triumph."
A wonderful comic novel about an irrepressible hustler and the culture that spawns and sustains him, set in Guyana, by the Guyanese-born author whose prizewinning fiction includes The Armstrong Trilogy (1994) and The Shadow Bride (1995). Read full book review >
MARGINALIA by Doran Larson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Competently written but thoroughly flat and ultimately annoying."
Extended meanderings through the thickets of pleasure and regret, without a convincing summing up. Read full book review >

THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR 7 by Stephen Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"If you think all horror is hackwork, try this."
The best single horror collection of the year features 26 pieces of short fiction by top writers, as well as a superb review of the year's output in horror writing in the English-speaking world by editor Jones. Read full book review >
JUST AN ORDINARY DAY by Shirley Jackson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Even at a bit below the level of her best work, it's nice to have Jackson back again."
A patchwork collection of 54 (mostly brief) stories, all previously uncollected and/or unpublished, by the late (191965) author of The Lottery, The Haunting of Hill House, and other classics of contemporary supernatural fiction. Read full book review >
A LETTER OF MARY by Laurie R. King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Even Holmes is muffled. (Author tour)"
Oxford theologian Mary Russell, now living quietly in Sussex with her husband Sherlock Holmes, is thunderstruck with the explosive potential of a document her old acquaintance, amateur archeologist Dorothy Ruskin, brings her from a dig in Palestine: a letter from one Mariam of Magdala identifying herself as an apostle of Jesus. Read full book review >

THE CONVERSATIONS AT CURLOW CREEK by David Malouf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Using material that might have been merely gaudy or melodramatic in less skilled hands, Malouf has shaped a terse, intelligent, resonant meditation on life and loss, again demonstrating that he's one of the brightest and most original of contemporary novelists."
An audacious and deeply moving meditation in fictional form on such essential matters as freedom and identity, explored in a series of conversations and recollections. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"To be skimmed, then, rather than read straight through, but nevertheless a collection that fills long-standing gaps in the fields of both supernatural fiction and women's studies."
A generous collection of 22 ghostly tales, some by well-known writers, most by long (and sometimes unjustly) forgotten authors. Read full book review >
REMNANTS OF THE FIRST EARTH by Ray A. Young Bear
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"It is one of the most interesting (and audacious) ongoing projects in American letters."
A continuation of native American poet Young Bear's exuberant fictionalized memoirs, begun in Black Eagle Child (1992), featuring the further remarkable adventures and recollections of the writer Edgar Bearchild. Read full book review >
THE LONELIEST ROAD IN AMERICA by Roy Parvin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Stories, in all, waiting to become as real in their people as they are in their setting."
Stories from newcomer Parvin give a feel for the backwoods life of mountain and forest in far northern California, but his characters' credibility is often less compelling than the wild places where they live. Read full book review >
SEWER, GAS AND ELECTRIC by Matt Ruff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A careening riot to read, even with all of its zestful improbabilities: Ruff's second novel can only enhance his reputation as a fantasy writer with imagination to burn."
After an eight-year hiatus (his 1988 novel, Fool on the Hill, became an underground hit), Ruff proves himself still capable of wild-eyed flights of fancy as he pits altruists against antihuman robots in an updated version of Atlas Shrugged above and below the streets of Manhattan. Read full book review >
HIGH-HEEL BLUE by Diane K. Shah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"On balance, then, a crisply written series opener seemingly Hollywood-aimed, with enough cop lore to interest, though not win over, fans of classic police procedurals."
A made-for-TV plot and other gratuitous, film-me-please Hollywood teasers lend a sour taste to a true-blue police procedural about a gung-ho female cop on the trail of (what else?) a serial killer. Read full book review >
BORDER DANCE by T.L. Toma
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 20, 1996

"Nonetheless, the prose here is powerful, impressionistic, and deftly ironic, and the minor characters, such as the expatriate American woman who sells trinkets and has seemingly sampled every self-actualization movement ever known, are memorable."
Promising debut about an aging Bostonian who confronts his midlife crisis in Mexico. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >