Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

SHOELESS JOE JACKSON COMES TO IOWA by W.P. Kinsella
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"Only for fans who want the entire oeuvre; others would do better to go to Kinsella's baseball novels to discover his most notable work."
Kinsella, best known for The Iowa Baseball Confederacy (1986), here offers his third collection, originally published in 1980 in Canada: a grab-bag of old stories and oddities, most notable for the piece out of which grew a novel and then the movie Field of Dreams. Read full book review >
ALLIGATOR DANCE by Janet Peery
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"An unusually confident, mature, and moving debut."
Middle-aged men, young girls, and angry teenaged boys stumble across moments of rare grace—in ten moody, memorable tales set mostly in Texas and Oklahoma. Read full book review >

NO LAUGHING MATTER by Dorothy Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"The author is coasting in this one—its piddling contrivances, dull characters, and somnolent pace will win no new fans for the usually reliable Inspector, who, it is to be hoped, will be back on track for number 13."
Sturrenden's Inspector Luke Thanet's 12th case (Wake the Dead, etc.) has him investigating the death of vineyard owner Zak Randish, found in his office amid a welter of blood and broken glass. Read full book review >
LOVE MEDICINE by Louise Erdrich
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 23, 1993

"But, despite flaws and excesses, this is a notable, impressive book of first fiction: the unique evocation of a culture in severe social ruin, yet still aglow with the privilege and power of access to the spirit-world."
Called a novel, Erdrich's book of powerful stories interlocks the lives of two Chippewa families in North Dakota, the Kashpaws and the Lamartines (though some are Morrisseys too, and Nanapushes)—a tribal chronicle of defeat that ranges from 1934 to the present, Illegitimacy, alcoholism, prison, and aborted dreams of something better mark both clans; and the fluidity of exchange between them is echoed by poet Erdrich's loose, time-shifting approach—an oblique sort of narration that sometimes makes it difficult to remember who's who among the characters. Read full book review >
LOVE MEDICINE by Louise Erdrich
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 23, 1993

"The new stories are not equal to the best of the old here, but also do no particular damage to the net effect."
Erdrich has added five new "chapters" to what in 1984 was originally called a novel. Read full book review >

MURDER IN THE EAST ROOM by Elliott Roosevelt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 1993

"Easy to take and steadily entertaining."
Yet another of the late author's posthumous novels, this one set in 1940 toward the end of FDR's second term, with France about to fall to Hitler's armies and isolationist forces in the US opposing every move to help Britain. Read full book review >
DANGER IN D.C. by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1993

"Caution: ingesting too many at a sitting could cause hairballs."
You either like cat mysteries or you don't, and this tepid collection of 20 all-new stories won't change your mind either way. Read full book review >
CORKER'S FREEDOM by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1993

"An intermittently perceptive novel, then, that lacks the economy of Berger's later fiction."
How do we process experience? Read full book review >
THE ROBBER BRIDE by Margaret Atwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1993

"Amusing sometimes, but flogged and padded—hardly one of Atwood's better efforts."
Antonia (Tony), Karen (Charis), and Roz are three 50-ish Toronto friends, pals since college, all of whom have had to negotiate (and none too well) the treacheries of another friend, Zenia—someone who in the past has stolen a significant man from each of the others. Read full book review >
LOVEDEATH by Dan Simmons
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1993

"Enduring stuff—even more memorable than Simmons's novels."
Five darkly erotic short novels that entwine love and death, with horror boosting the sex, by World Fantasy Award winner Simmons (Children of Night, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR BEND by Robert James Waller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 1993

A second wafer-thin romance from the author of The Bridges of Madison County, the debut novel propelled by Wallermania onto the bestseller lists, where it still reigns supreme. Read full book review >
ME & MY MOM by Marianne Hauser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 1993

"With the scorpion sting of some direct, merciless, fairly awful truths about aging moms and raging daughters."
From the 82-year-old author of such avant exercises as The Talking Room (1976) and the witty The Memoir of the Late Mr. Ashley (1986): a story that concerns the tensions of love, hate, fear, and guilt in the deadly round of approach, hurt, and withdrawal—a round with no exit—in the relationship between an aging mother and her married daughter. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Libba Bray
author of LAIR OF DREAMS
August 25, 2015

In Lair of Dreams, the second installment of Libba Bray’s bestselling young adult Diviners series, after a supernatural showdown with a serial killer, Evie O'Neill has outed herself as a Diviner. Now that the world knows of her ability to "read" objects, and therefore, read the past, she has become a media darling, earning the title "America's Sweetheart Seer." But not everyone is so accepting of the Diviners' abilities....Meanwhile, mysterious deaths have been turning up in the city, victims of an unknown sleeping sickness. Can the Diviners descend into the dreamworld and catch a killer? “Weaving together a chilling mystery with a truly elusive solution, several poignant love stories, agonizing injustice, terrifyingly monstrous dreams, and even a cameo by legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung, this installment wraps enough up to satisfy but clearly sets the stage for more,” our reviewer writes in a rare starred review. “How will readers stand the wait?” View video >