Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

BOXING'S BEST SHORT STORIES by Paul D. Staudohar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Strong themes about men with heart, though none about violinists with a killer hook in the ring."
Muhammad Ali called it "just a job. Read full book review >
DARK EAGLE by John Ensor Harr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But Harr's ambitious debut is an informed, dramatic, and well-woven contribution to a genre that seems to be, and shouldn't be, out of fashion these days."
A wide-ranging historical romance—the first novel by a historian hitherto known for his two books about the Rockefeller family—hearkens back to the American Revolution and the complex figure of Benedict Arnold, renowned among military peers as "the very genius of war" while subsequently reviled as the very apotheosis of treachery and deceit. Read full book review >

YESTERDAY by Fern Michaels
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Strictly for the fans."
Paralyzingly prolific romancer Michaels has her ups and downs, from the total nonsense of Finders Keepers (1998) to the exemplary plotting of Celebration (p. 103), in which a wealthy woman's husband flees with her bank account after a 20-year marriage, only to return years later with a sob story but minus the eight million he ran off with. Read full book review >
THE LOST GLASS PLATES OF WILFRED ENG by Thomas Orton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"An unusual and beguiling debut performance."
An intricately plotted, very interesting first novel that intermittently echoes both Gaddis's The Recognitions and Fowles's The French Lieutenant's Woman while patiently tracing a disgraced artist's arduous path toward some sort of authenticity in his personal life. Read full book review >
BLADES OF GRASS by Lao She
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Lao She's expert translators have also provided a detailed and informative Postscript that convincingly makes the case for including him among China's greatest modern writers."
paper 0-8248-1803-2 Blades Of Grass ($48.00; $18.95 paper; Oct. 1; 320 pp.; 0-8248-1506-8; paper 0-8248-1803-2) An attractive collection of 15 nicely varied stories, set mostly in China in the 1930s, by the pseudonymous master (1899—1966) who was murdered by Mao's Red Guards, then —rehabilitated— in 1978. Read full book review >

SIMON'S FAMILY by Marianne Fredriksson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"At her best (that is, when not gently lecturing the reader), Fredriksson seems almost a Scandinavian R.F. Delderfield: a chronicler of ordinary lives whose judicious mingling of sentimentality and realism makes for absorbing and satisfying reading."
Simon's Family ($24.00; Oct.; 336 pp.; 0-345-43459-5). Read full book review >
AT THE FULL AND CHANGE OF THE MOON by Dionne Brand
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Alice Walker with a Caribbean flavor and believable men: a sort of dream of history."
A poetic, loosely plotted tale beginning with an 1824 slave revolt in Trinidad. Read full book review >
FULLER MAN by Diane Glancy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Well-intentioned, but more interesting for its ideas than for its characters."
The prolific Glancy (Flutie, 1998, etc.) continues her exploration of the sources and nature of religious faith. Read full book review >
MILLENNIUM RISING by Jane Jensen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Imaginative, snappy and incident-packed, though the plot would work better if Jensen didn't keep giving the game away: an exciting debut."
Near-future SF thriller from Jensen, designer of the Gabriel Knight computer-game mystery series. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Superior whimsy, nicely told, and perfect for the cat-fancier's Christmas."
The author of Diary of a Cat (1995, etc.) returns with a suspense tale. Read full book review >
THEO'S ODYSSEY by Catherine Clément
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"A pleasant almanac garnished with enough dialogue and local color to insure its pilgrimage to the shelves where the novels are kept."
ClÇment now does for world religions what Jostein Gaarder did for philosophy in the popular Sophie's World (1994): Pack the basics into an informative, thick brochure, weave a story through the ideas, and offer the result as a novel. Read full book review >
SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE RUNE STONE MYSTERY by Larry Millett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

Sherlock Holmes And The Runestone Mystery ($23.95; Oct.; 336 pp.; 0-670-88821-4) It's spring 1899: time of course for another adventure of Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota, where he and Watson—and barkeeper/inquiry agent Shadwell Rafferty (Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders, 1998)—will try to authenticate the Holandberg rune stone: a task made considerably more difficult when Olaf Wahlgren, the farmer who dug it up, is murdered and the stone snatched away. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >