Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1795)

THE DEATH OF COLONEL MANN by Cynthia Peale
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"Peale, a pseudonym for historical novelist Nancy Zaroulis (Massachusetts, 1991, etc.), gets the period detail right, but little else."
Picture the cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages, blanketing fog, and rampant snobbery of Victorian Boston: ``A fierce world, in which the women fought more bitterly than the men.'' The acceptable marriage is rewarded with such dubious honors as the favored place in the right sewing circle. Read full book review >
FACE DOWN BENEATH THE ELEANOR CROSS by Kathy Lynn Emerson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"Despite a mystery that eventually turns messy and some cumbersome period detail, Emerson gets a star for high drama and the graceful planting of background information."
Although her era's ominous intrigues are everywhere evident, Elizabeth I appears only offstage in Lady Susanna Appleton's fourth adventure (Face Down Among the Winchester Geese, 1999, etc.), which begins in 1565 as Elizabeth's favorite, Robin Dudley, fingers herbalist Susanna as the culprit who poisoned her late husband. Read full book review >

PLACE LAST SEEN by Charlotte McGuinn Freeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"Suspenseful, painful, ultimately redemptive: a beautiful debut from a writer to watch."
An elegant and agonizing story about the three-day search for a young child whose disappearance in the wilderness of the Sierra Nevadas wreaks emotional havoc on her family. Read full book review >
THE ROBBER by Robert Walser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"At the very least, it'll make your day."
A first English translation of a discursive, playful 1925 novel by the Swiss German master who spent the last third of his life (1878-1956) in a mental institution. Read full book review >
MOVING LILA by Julie Fleming
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"A nicely written debut, but with little emotional punch."
An intimate drama of family secrets that moves at a compelling pace, yet leaves one wondering what all the fuss was about. Read full book review >

THE ROAD TO FEZ by Ruth Knafo Setton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"Desperately uneven, but this first-time author may well be, even so, a voice worth hearing again."
Like the heroine of her first novel, Setton was born in Morocco but raised in the States. Her command of the setting, though, suggests that Morocco has stayed with her deep-down inside. Read full book review >
MOLLY by Nancy J. Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"A pathway of good intentions."
A first-timer enters the let's rewrite Lolita sweepstakes—and, hands down, doesn't win. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"Mostly, though, the grim logic of Howard's heroes (City Blood, 1994, etc.) is so persuasive that the few (and relatively weak) happy endings here, which offer just enough false hope to juice the other stories, are even more depressing than the others."
Not all Howard's heroes are ex-cons, but they might as well be. Read full book review >
THE HORUS KILLINGS by P.C. Doherty
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

The second installment in the series medieval veteran Doherty began with The Mask of Ra (1999) brings back Amerotke, now Chief Judge of Egypt, to investigate a series of murders—beginning with the poisoning of the Temple of Horus' chief librarian—that rock the house of Menes, the pharaoh who's united Egypt, it seems, only to watch it slip away one citizen at a time. Read full book review >
THE SOUND OF ONE HAND CLAPPING by Richard Flanagan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"But there's no denying the power in his own wild flights of prose. (First printing of 30,000)"
Winner of the Australian Booksellers' Book of the Year Award, a passionate working-class tale (and first US publication) from a Tasmanian author. Read full book review >
THE OTHER REBECCA by Maureen Freely
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"A delicious but sometimes disappointing retelling of the legendary page-turner."
From an American writer (My Year with the Stork Club, 1993, etc.) yet published first in Britain: a wickedly clever and witty reworking of Du Maurier's famous novel, a takeoff that falters only when Rebecca herself appears. Read full book review >
RUMORS OF WAR by Peggy Tibbetts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 29, 2000

"Thankfully, though, there's a bright spot: Ilene's stock mother-in-law-from-hell, who manages to spring to vivid and frightening life. She should get her own book."
Petty suburban struggles, set against the backdrop of the Persian Gulf War. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >