Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1809)

MY DATE WITH SATAN by Stacey Richter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1999

"Then it won—t matter' ') and a strong eye for character."
Thirteen stories, most depicting the various confusions of the clever and the young. Read full book review >
LOOSE LIPS by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1999

"The frequent one-liners often seem more sitcom than novel material, going nowhere and telling less, but there are still good laughs along the way."
Brown brings back the wacky Hunsenmeir sisters attended by all the good and not-so-good folk of Runnymede (Six of One, 1978; Bingo, 1988), as middle age and war give a new edge to their chronic if overhyped sibling rivalry. Read full book review >

A WOMAN OF PASSION by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1999

"Written in reckless, slamming prose that mirrors its redheaded heroine's blazing tantrums."
Henley's 16th dish of romance (A Year and a Day, 1998, etc.) tells of commoner Bess Hardwick's life from ages six to forty as she rises from poverty to become Queen Elizabeth's lady-in-waiting and to make a spectacular marriage to the richest lord in England, all the while taking full advantage of the period's sexy freedoms. Read full book review >
FLINT'S HONOR by Richard S. Wheeler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1999

"Henry Jackson Stoddard and includes Stoddard's ties to Sam Clemens, a fellow Gold Rush reporter who went on to greater things."
The dizzyingly prolific Wheeler's thirtysomethingth novel, windup to the trilogy begun with Flint's Gift (1997) and Flint's Truth (1998), which is at heart a saga about western journalism in the 19th century. Read full book review >
THE WANTON ANGEL by Edward Marston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1999

"A fun, easygoing summer's day read."
Another visit (the tenth, following The Fair Maid of Bohemia, 1997) to Elizabethan England and a new crisis for the theater company Lord Westfield's Men, managed by wily Nicholas Bracewell and starring the fiery Lawrence Firethorn. Read full book review >

KILLING ME SOFTLY by Nicci French
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 1999

"0-688-15818-8): The second installment in Furutani's samurai trilogy (Death at the Crossroads, 1998) finds freelance warrior Matsuyama Kaze interrupting his search for his dead lord's son to save merchant Hishigawa Satoyasu from murderous bandits—and then getting plenty of chances to regret the act of courage that's landed him in a stew of deception and treachery."
After two in England, French brings her third to the US—an elegant, chilling take on love, murder, and obsession. Read full book review >
RIVER, CROSS MY HEART by Breena Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 1999

"Otherwise, an only fair-to-middling effort."
An anemic first novel so well-intentioned that it's almost painful to point out its myriad deficiencies. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 1999

"Despite the outlandishness of her constructions, there is a precision to her narration that's remarkable."
A debut collection of 13 rather creepy stories, most describing ordinary people who undergo extraordinarily bizarre events. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 1999

"If you considered Australia too remote and sparsely populated to be science fictionally important—well, think again."
Not the first volume of Australian SF (editor Van Iken's rather indiscriminate collection arrived here in 1984) but by far the most significant: 20 substantial tales from the modern era, the majority of whose authors will be familiar to Kirkus regulars and SF-story buffs. A. Bertram Chandler (1912—84) offers an ingenious explanation for why Australian Aborigines revere Ayer's Rock. Read full book review >
WHAT THE HEART KNOWS by Kathleen Eagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1999

"Eagle's rich understanding of Indian lore lends an attractively exotic cast to an otherwise familiar love story."
Veteran romancer Eagle (The Night Remembers, 1997, etc.) returns to her favorite subject, the trials of modern Native Americans, about which she is well-informed by virtue of marriage to a Lakota Sioux and 17 years of teaching on a North Dakota Indian reservation. Read full book review >
TRUE AT FIRST LIGHT by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1999

"Uneven, imperfect, irritating, amusing, moving, and of treasurable importance to an understanding of this massive however flawed genius of our literature."
Ernest Hemingway never kept a journal, says his son Patrick, editor of this book from a manuscript twice its size describing life in a Kenyan safari camp in the winter of 1953—54. Read full book review >
OUTLAW MOUNTAIN by J.A. Jance
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1999

"Not much dash to the prose, depth to the plotting, or nuance to the characters, but Jance has a certain reassuring sturdiness, and those who like her won't be disappointed here. (Mystery Guild Dual Main Selection; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Trouble in bunches for Cochise County (Ariz.) Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >