Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1809)

THE SECRET OF SPANDAU by Peter Lovesey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A bit too much Goodbody derring-do, however, but Lovesey adds nice classic-puzzle elements."
Lovesey, honored this year with the British Crime Writers Association's Diamond Dagger award for lifetime excellence, sets three reporters loose to discover why Hitler confidante Rudolf Hess, the Nazi who secretly reoutfitted a Messerschmitt and flew it from Germany to Scotland to establish peace negotiations during WW11, was the sole occupant of Spandau prison never to be released. Read full book review >
DEM by William Melvin Kelley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Finding it more contrived than Kelley's other work, we found it also 'more angry,' as well as a 'powerful and delicate handling of a heavy theme and an unwieldy plot.'"
Kelley's 1967 novel is here reprinted as part of the press's Black Arts Movement Series: books from the resurgence of African-American literature during the '60s and early '70s. Read full book review >

FREE by Anika Nailah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Stories that wear their moral outlook on their sleeves."
A debut collection primarily concerned with the societal strictures laid on both whites and blacks. Read full book review >
PEN PALS by Olivia Goldsmith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Social work as satire: The harsh realities of prison life are noted briefly on the way to a formulaic (and rather improbable) happy ending. Goldsmith (Bad Boy, 2001, etc.) has done better."
A Wall Street whiz takes an insider-trading rap for her crooked boss and winds up in prison. Read full book review >
AFRICA SPEAKS by Mark Goldblatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"It takes chutzpah for a nonblack to write something like this, but some risks are worth the effort for what they reveal of essential humanity. This is one."
An oddity, this story of New York street-smart black life by columnist and Bible studies instructor Goldblatt (Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY) is actually both hip and moving. Read full book review >

MUSIC FOR THE THIRD EAR by Susan Schwartz Senstad
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A look into loss and horror, in war and out, that is capable of compelling its reader—and leaving behind a sense of deep pity"
Newcomer Senstad offers up a tightly plotted—if at times credibility-stretching—little tragedy with its roots in the atrocities of the Bosnian war. Read full book review >
GABRIEL’S STORY by David Anthony Durham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A brilliant example of how to assimilate and transmute powerful literary influence. And what a movie this dark, haunting tale will make."
Intensely dramatic debut, set in Kansas and points west and southwest during the 1870s: a direct homage to Cormac McCarthy's highly praised fiction (both his Blood Meridian and the recent Border Trilogy) but also an original work of high distinction. Read full book review >
MISS GARNET’S ANGEL by Salley Vickers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A rich, moving, and satisfying tale of a woman engaged at last with the great mysteries of love and life. Beautifully wrought and impressively wise."
An incandescent debut, and bestseller in Britain, luminously details transforming encounters that change a lonely spinster's life when she decides to live in Venice. Read full book review >
LESTRADE AND THE MIRROR OF MURDER by M.J. Trow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Cameos by Scotland Yard Chief Inspector Walter Dew, amateur spiritualist Arthur Conan Doyle (though Holmes himself is absent), and John Buchan, who at the fadeout is preparing to turn the whole mess into a much better novel than this one."
Nearly 40 years after the suicide of Emperor Theodore III, Abyssinia is back in the news—or at least on the blotter for Supt. Read full book review >
THE INTERPRETER by Suzanne Glass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"The plot is whisper-thin, and newcomer Glass, a columnist for London's Financial Times, doesn't say whether it has any factual basis. The main interest here lies in her subtle characterization and moody, elegiac style."
Oddly understated debut novel about a possible cure for AIDS. Read full book review >
POOR TOM IS COLD by Maureen Jennings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"As carefully sensitive as Jennings's first two evocations of 1895 Toronto (Under the Dragon's Tail, 1998, etc.), though perhaps the most thinly plotted of all."
When Constable Oliver Wicken, of Toronto's number four station, doesn't appear at his late-night check point, acting detective William Murdoch goes looking for him, and all too soon discovers his body inside an abandoned house along his beat. Read full book review >
IN BEAUTIFUL DISGUISES by Rajeev Balasubramanyam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"If the early Evelyn Waugh had been Anglo-Indian, he would have written In Beautiful Disguises."
A first-time author's talent for comic character portrayal makes something special out of this otherwise fairly conventional novel—albeit another in the ever-lengthening list of accomplished fiction out of India—about a dreamy young woman's fantasies of Hollywood stardom set against the humdrum realities of family, occupation, and—most unwelcome of all—an impending arranged marriage. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >