Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1809)

THE DANCE HALL AT SPRING HILL by Duke Klassen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 25, 1996

"Hits and misses, then, though all touched at least somewhere with the genuine breath of life."
As part of the Minnesota Voices Project, newcomer Klassen offers 15 stories varying in quality, originality, and polish—all set in small-town and farmland Minnesota. Read full book review >
CHRISTMAS IN SCANDINAVIA by Sven H. Rossel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 25, 1996

"An indispensable collection and one of the most delightful fictional surprises of the year."
Christmas In Scandinavia ($25.00 until Dec. 31, 1996; $30.00 thereafter; Sept. 1996; 280 pp.; 0-8032-3907-6): This marvelous anthology collects 17 splendid tales by 19th- and 20th-century writers from the Scandinavian countries, Faroe Islands, and Finland. Read full book review >

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF MAVIS GALLANT by Mavis Gallant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1996

"A book whose time has come, showcasing the work of a master who should finally be recognized as such. (15,000 first printing)"
The Collected Stories Of Mavis Gallant ($45.00; Sept. 24, 1996; 1200 pp.; 0-679-44886-1): A huge and imposingly accomplished collection- -the sort that calls for our immediate reassessment of a writer's career—displaying more than a half-century of work from the Canadian-born Francophile whose wry explorations of alienation and culture conflict typify the kind of sophistication associated with the New Yorker (where virtually all of these 52 tales first appeared). Read full book review >
WATERY GRAVE by Bruce Alexander
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1996

"Even fans of Sir John, however, will probably judge his third outing his weakest."
Months after the storm at sea in which Captain Josiah Markham perished, H.M.S. Adventure returns to England. Read full book review >
COLLECTED STORIES by Alan Sillitoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1996

"Read selectively, this is a worthwhile collection."
Collected Stories ($14.00 paperback original; Sept. 23, 1996; 586 pp.; 0-00-649306-8): Thirty-eight stories gathered from Sillitoe's five volumes of short fiction about the English working-class, marred by a numbing redundancy in themes and settings. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1996

"Wald writes with a simplicity and frankness that are unusual but perfectly suited to her subject."
Strange and unsettling stories of sadomasochism (originally self-published) from a newcomer who obviously knows the territory. Read full book review >
IN THE HOLD by Vladimir Arsenijevic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1996

"Either way, what results is a protagonist in whom it's impossible to take much interest, and a novel so rarefied and unspecific that it seems, despite its brevity, an ordeal to read."
A strangely uninvolving first novel—a muted, discursive portrayal of alienation and anomie set in Belgrade in 1991—that won for its young author the NIN Prize, the ``highest literary honor'' given in the now dissolved nation of Yugoslavia. Read full book review >
DEAR FUTURE by Fred D’Aguiar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1996

"Life, laughter, and sorrow woven into a thing of beauty by a genuinely gifted writer."
Second-novelist D'Aguiar, winner of the Whitbread and David Higham awards for The Longest Memory (1995), here offers a poetic and often moving tale of a broken-up Caribbean family. Read full book review >
RAPTURE by David Sosnowski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 1996

"Sosnowski writes like- -well, an angel."
Inventive first novel with the unlikely theme that humankind is about to evolve into a new species: angels. Read full book review >
FATHER AND SON by Larry Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 1996

"A riveting tale of an unforgiving and cruel world. (Author tour)"
From a small rural southern world of guns and hounds and whiskey, Mississippi writer Brown (Joe, 1991, etc.) fashions a redneck tragedy of timeless dimensions—a novel in which fate drives the plot to its necessarily bloody denouement. Read full book review >
NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 1996

"An estimable volume in an estimable—and getting on toward the venerable—series."
The second decade of this fine series begins with a real coup- -a story by the King of Southern culture himself: no, not Elvis, but William Faulkner, a previously unpublished story rediscovered by the editor of The Oxford American, itself a bright new addition to the literary scene down home. Read full book review >
BLUE ITALIAN by Rita Ciresi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 1996

"Ciresi's irreverent sense of humor and sharp eye for ethnic detail raise this story above Love Story's schmaltz, but her bland, unreflective characters just don't capture the reader's heart."
The author of Mother Rocket (1993), winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award, disappoints in this debut Love Storylike novel of a poor New Haven girl who marries a rich Yale boy only to lose him to a fatal illness. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >