Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1809)

NIGHT RIDE HOME by Barbara Esstman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"One of those reassuring it's never-too-late-to-live-and-love- stories that will resonate with aging boomers and 40-plus romantics. (First printing of 75,000; $75,000 ad/promo)"
Youthful passions still burn strong as Esstman (The Other Anna, not reviewed), in a second novel that tries hard to tug the heartstrings but only occasionally succeeds, profiles a woman who finds the courage to reclaim her life after losing her son. Read full book review >
THE BOOKSHOP by Penelope Fitzgerald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Pitch-perfect in every tone, note, and detail: unflinching, humane, and wonderful."
On the heels of The Blue Flower (1997), here's a slighter, equally charming, half as deep little novel—about snobbery and meanness in the provinces—that the immensely gifted Fitzgerald published in England in 1978. Read full book review >

THE COMPLETE STORIES by Bernard Malamud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Believe me, we believe him."
A generous, invaluable volume that collects the 53 stories published during his 40-year career by a master of both realism and surrealism, a writer who begins to look more and more like one of the very best modern American writers. Read full book review >
A GRACIOUS PLENTY by Sheri Reynolds
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A southern tearjerker with some nice surprises—and likely to be a swift success. (First printing of 300,000)"
Reynolds again hits pay dirt with a third novel, after Bitterroot Landing (1995) and The Rapture of Canaan (1996)—the latter, as everyone knows, a recent selection of Oprah's Book Club and now enjoying its fifth week at the top of the bestseller lists. Read full book review >
LARRY'S PARTY by Carol Shields
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

A meticulous coming-of-(middle)-age novel by Pulitzer Prize- winner Shields (The Stone Diaries, 1993, etc.), who seems to have mastered the art of understatement without falling into the bottomless pit of obscurity. Read full book review >

AN ACT OF LOVE by Nancy Thayer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Thayer's bland prose style doesn't help. (TV rights to ABC-TV; Literary Guild Alternate Selection)"
Can a tale of the rape of a teenaged girl by her stepbrother, even when it's told by the author of Belonging, 1995, among other contemporary romances, really be anything but sordid and unpleasant? Read full book review >
GREAT APES by Will Self
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"HoooGraa! (First printing of 30,000; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Entering a Self fantasy (Grey Area, 1996, etc.) demands both a strong stomach and a readiness to experience narrative pyrotechnics, but in this second novel (after My Idea of Fun, 1994), in which an artist wakes up after a bender to discover that his entire world is now run by chimpanzees, these demands are amply rewarded. Read full book review >
MISS OPHELIA by Mary Burnett Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"An attractive first novel, then, told with a smooth pro confidence, and with the style and ambiance of postWW II popular fiction. (Literary Guild alternate; author tour)"
A gently affecting tale set in the apartheid-striated Virginia of 1948, where a young girl in a rural ``colored'' community learns something about the complexities of adult love. Read full book review >
DELUGE by Albertine Strong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"While Strong adds few fresh touches to this standard intergenerational saga, her graceful prose and affection for Chippewa lore make for a lively, involving tale."
An unexceptional if appealing debut in which a part-Chippewa woman recounts the experiences of three generations of her family. Read full book review >
APPARITION ALLEY by Katherine V. Forrest
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Forrest (Liberty Square, 1996, etc.) gives full weight to her lesbian heroine's anguish at coming to terms with her personal demons without ever swamping a police-corruption plot that could have been plucked from today's headlines."
Watch your back when you're arresting a drug suspect for the LAPD. Read full book review >
FOUR LETTERS OF LOVE by Niall Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Brilliant."
A remarkable first novel from Williams—whose four previous books, written with his wife, have chronicled contemporary Irish life (The Luck of the Irish, 1995, etc.)—offers a powerful portrait of tragedy and of the redemption offered by love. Read full book review >
EVER by Felicity Savage
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Noisy, chaotic, not even half thought out: an unconvincing grab-bag of an opener."
First installment of a fantasy trilogy, from the author of the mass market Delta City (1996), etc. Captive daemons, cruelly confined and tortured, produce the motive power for vehicles and machines in Savage's oddball world. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >