Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1809)

THE REHEARSAL by Sarah Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A performance curiously devoid of sound and fury."
A disappointing second novel from the award-winning author of Some Things That Stay (not reviewed) focuses on a group of actors gathered for a 1971 provincial theater production. Read full book review >
SOULMATE by Deepak Chopra
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"To this, add Chopra's humor, his brilliant medical dialogue, and the power and richness of Raj's battle against materialist psychiatry. A contender."
Love as the basic fabric of human life offers mind-body healer Chopra a more focused story this time around than he found for his debut fiction, The Return of Merlin (1995), a tale about the magical effects of Arthurian archetypes on today's England. Read full book review >

EMPIRE SETTINGS by David Schmahmann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Tailor-made for Hollywood, and sure to jerk a few tears."
A South Africa native and practicing lawyer debuts with a light story about a privileged white family making their way through guilt and broken hearts in a post-apartheid world. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Now that he's survived 60 stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, countless parodies and pastiches, and even two Christmases (Greenberg and Lellenberg's More Holmes for the Holidays, 1999, etc.), what new worlds are left for Sherlock Holmes to conquer? Read full book review >
A SELFISH WOMAN by Christopher Brookhouse
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A sympathetic view of a woman at a crossroads, to be sure, but also a story with more polished surfaces than actual depth."
The waters are roiled in a small New England college when a part-time professor takes up with her teaching assistant—in Brookhouse's (Dear Otto, 1995, etc.) gentle but overly precious fifth. Read full book review >

SWELL FOOP by Piers Anthony
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"As for Foop's cosmically demonic plot, the very flabber of the words leaves us poggled as pigs aghast on the roofs of barns."
Twenty-fifth gravitational sinkhole in Anthony's heroically unbalanced Xanth series, with Swell Foop just as dreadfully glum as Roc and a Hard Place, Harpy Thyme, and the stoic Faun and Games (1997), graveyard items all, girding us with Hamlet's "I do not set my life at a pun's fee." Read full book review >
ROMNEY by Owen Wister
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Like Wharton's best work, the unfinished Romney, along with Wister's essays about Philadelphia society, remains striking for its examination of American social pathologies that, despite changes in ethnic, cultural and technological composition, remain virulently prevalent today."
An unfinished third novel, with three additional essays, about a contentedly corrupt belle époque Philadelphia—where the famed Wister (1860-1938) went west to cure his depression after William Dean Howells rejected his first attempts at fiction. Read full book review >
THE SAVAGE GIRL by Alex Shakar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"With the crafty-eyed precision of Don DeLillo and the humor of Neal Stephenson, a world where image is life and the Next Big Thing is a mouse-click away."
A bitterly funny broadside on market-driven contemporary life. Read full book review >
BONES OF THE BURIED by David Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Not much for Verity to do here except be duped, but Roberts provides a solid primer on Eton society, European alliances, and British concessions to Nazis' interests on the eve of war."
The second appearance (Sweet Poison, 2001) of those unlikely chums, Communist dogsbody Verity Browne and Lord Edward Corinth, finds Verity sending dispatches from Spain, on the brink of civil war in 1936, to the New Gazette as she waits desperately for Edward to fly in from London and save her political mentor, David Griffiths-Jones, scheduled for execution in one week for the murder of Godfrey Tilney. Read full book review >
THE DISTANT LAND OF MY FATHER by Bo Caldwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"An elegant, refined story of families, wartime, and the mystique of memory."
A daughter tries to understand her father's long absences from her life in this effective and accomplished debut. Read full book review >
THE WEBSTER CHRONICLE by Daniel Akst
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Such blemishes aside, though: an always-interesting novel of opinions fashioned more to goad than move its readers."
New York Times columnist Akst, in a news-smart and doggedly workmanlike second novel (St. Burl's Obituary, not reviewed), limns an entire country's Reagan-era fall from grace, all starting with the spanking of a preschool child. Read full book review >
SUGAR OF LEAD by Almer John Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A sprawling effort that has plenty of promise, but attempts to conquer too many literary possibilities."
An Anglo embedded in the Korean gang culture of Southern California undertakes a journey of revenge, only to find he ultimately seeks redemption. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >