Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

AMONG THE MISSING by Dan Chaon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"A gem of a second collection from an immensely promising writer of unmistakably original—and distinctively rewarding—literary gifts."
Twelve new fictions, notable for their stylistic grace and captivating selection of incident, by the author of Fitting Ends (stories: 1995). Read full book review >
THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS by Elizabeth Adler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Silly romance with an absurdly shallow lover—though Dan seems deep enough for Lara."
Fifteenth romance from the bestselling Adler (All or Nothing, 2000, etc.), this time about a doctor's wife who runs off to France with her young lover . Read full book review >

PULP MASTERS by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"The two exceptions are James M. Cain, whose tricky valentine 'The Embezzler' is vintage Cain, and Mickey Spillane, who, despite the absence of Mike Hammer from 'Everybody's Watching Me,' sounds, for better or worse, exactly like Spillane."
The biggest revelation of these five pulp novelettes, 1938-77, and Harry Whittington's 1953 short novel So Dead My Love is how much more their common voices and formulas, often displayed in apprentice work, make then sound like each other than like the eventually famous authors—John D. MacDonald (a fraternity killer), Lawrence Block (a stag-party killer), Donald E. Westlake (a sad, crimeless anti-romance)—you thought you knew. Read full book review >
TENNANT’S ROCK by Steve McGiffen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Still, this slow-moving, impressionistic tale lacks dramatic edge, despite the harrowing circumstances."
A lackluster debut details the hardships of frontier life. Read full book review >
BOMBAY TIME by Thrity Umrigar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Umrigar's debut unfolds raga-like, the histories of its people forming sustained riffs that spring from and return to the same source. The minimal plotting is at times contrived and sentimental, but the portrait of the city and its citizens is authoritative, richly textured, and engaging."
A first novel trains an unflinching eye on Indians at home and abroad. Set in contemporary Bombay, Umrigar's story is both a valentine to the past and a lament for the present of its title city. Read full book review >

EDGEWATER ANGELS by Sandro Meallet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"A story that begins with death and ends with birth: in-between, there's a powerful anecdotal tale of salvation."
Irony, cynicism, realism—even a touch of magical realism—blend together in this coming-of-age debut set in the projects of Los Angeles. Read full book review >
GREEN RIVER DAYDREAMS by Liu Heng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"An absorbing tale, comparable to the fiction of Liu Heng's accomplished contemporary Su Tong, and perhaps also Zola (who may well have inspired them both) at his incendiary best."
A richly detailed realistic saga from the Chinese author best known for his novel Black Snow (1993) and for stories reshaped into the critically praised films Ju Dou and Red Sorghum. Read full book review >
CHUM by Mark Spitzer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"A remarkably feeble novel, for all the yawns induced by its unimaginative scribbling, its monotonous plot, and its ridiculously self-conscious attempts to shock the reader."
Both a sophomore effort and a sophomoric ordeal, bleached free of literary color and grayed over with the lurid details of life on an Alaskan island village, depicting what happens when a shipwrecked starlet turns up on its ruthless shore. Read full book review >
SUZANNE’S DIARY FOR NICHOLAS by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

For sheer genre-crossing audacity, you might think nothing could outdo John Grisham's season on a Mississippi farm (A Painted House, p. 128) until you read this relentlessly throat-clutching love story from thrillermeister Patterson. Read full book review >
JACQUELINE SUSANN’S SHADOW OF THE DOLLS by Rae Lawrence
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Capable but unexciting rehash of classic sleaze."
They're b-a-a-a-a-c-k! Read full book review >
RISE TO REBELLION by Jeff Shaara
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"The first of two volumes. One hopes Shaara will take more time with its successor, and produce a novel that compares more favorably with the best of its predecessors."
A disappointing chronicle of the beginnings (1770-76) of the American Revolutionary War: the fourth blockbuster historical in only five years from the hard-working author of Gods and Generals (1996), The Last Full Measure (1998), and Gone for Soldiers (2000). Read full book review >
THE CATSITTERS by James Wolcott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

Fans of critic Wolcott, who's written some of the funniest, most penetrating cultural reviews of the last 25 years, will be surprised by this, his first book, a novel that's so milquetoast you have to wonder if it's really by the same James Wolcott, scourge of shabby prose and shoddy thinking. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >