Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

WORDS ARE SOMETHING ELSE by David Albahari
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"The Great Rebellion at the tuln Nazi Camp''), but all are accomplished and resonant tales: powerful evidence of the emergence of yet another important Eastern European writer—and a pleasurable and rewarding surprise in store for American readers."
Words Are Something Else ($49.95; paper $15.95; Aug. 1996; 200 pp.; 0-8101-1305-8; paper 0-8101-1306-6): A masterly collection of 27 stories written between the early 1970s and the present by Albahari, a brilliant Serbian writer whose obsessive identifying theme is the transformation and destruction of Jewish culture during WW II. Read full book review >
DEATH AND THE DERVISH by Mesa Selimovic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"It's by no means a perfect work of art, but there is greatness in it."
Death And The Dervish ($39.95; paper $15.95; Aug. 1996; 480 pp.; 0-8101-1296-5; paper 0-8101-1297-3): A famous novel, originally published in 1966 in Yugoslavia, by an eminent Bosnian author who died (in 1982) before completing the trilogy it was intended to initiate. Read full book review >

POPE JOAN by Donna Woolfolk Cross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Still, what seems a too facile rendering of a complex story might certainly appeal as light summer reading."
A remarkable woman uses her considerable intellect—and more than a little luck—to rise from humble origins to become the only female Pope, in this breakneck adventure from newcomer Cross. Read full book review >
SONG OF THE TURTLE by Paula Gunn Allen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"A volume devoted to memoirs and essays would be welcome."
Allen, a prolific Native American poet and novelist, follows up an earlier anthology of modern American Indian fiction (Voice of the Turtle: American Indian Literature 1900-1970, not reviewed) with a second volume bringing her sampling of the field up to date. Read full book review >
AT THE CITY LIMITS OF FATE by Michael Bishop
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Chilly, intellectual, extended metaphorical ruminations for the most part, with the emotions only rarely engaged: for minority tastes only."
Bishop's latest collection (One Winter in Eden, 1984, etc.) brings together 15 tales, 198696, drawn from a wide variety of periodicals and anthologies, many with a strong mainstream/experimental flavor. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"A useful collection, featuring some promising younger writers."
A powerful, often grim gathering of fiction exploring with anger and vigor the struggles waged by those who are both black and homosexual to discover and preserve their identities. Read full book review >
KING AND GODDESS by Judith Tarr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"An uncompelling yarn whose lifeless characters and lackluster backdrop fail to capture the spirit of singularity of the historical period: the least successful of an at best mediocre series."
Another of Tarr's historicals set in ancient Egypt (Pillar of Fire, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
THE OTHER FAMILY by Jacqueline Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Carey's in sure command of color, place, and atmosphere, but her characters themselves too often stay half-hidden, waiting to be drawn into true and full dimension."
Carey's eye and humor as a storywriter (Good Gossip, 1992) are here again, but even so her first novel—about family and divorce in the confusion of the late '60s—creeps at so benignly slow a pace as to risk its readers not waiting for the lovely close. Read full book review >
LOVERBOYS by Ana Castillo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Only occasionally missing the mark (there are some failed narrative experiments), Castillo offers a substantial and noteworthy first collection, both honest and witty in its portrayal of love among the exiled. (Author tour)"
While explicitly probing the politics of otherness, this debut collection of 26 stories from Chicago writer Castillo (So Far from God, 1993, etc.) also concerns itself with the universal patterns of love. Read full book review >
THE EX by John Lutz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Veterans of Lutz's earlier New York paranoid fantasy might as well wait for the film now in production via Mark Lester."
Private-eye specialist Lutz, who did so much to popularize the genre of the nanny/cop/temp/girlfriend from hell with SWF Seeks Same (1989), is back with—what else?—the ex-wife from hell. Read full book review >
THROWBACK by Frank C. Strunk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Strunk tries to balance his macho violence with lessons on family values and homespun wisdom, but plot weaknesses make Clayfield's sensitive homilies hard to buy."
Two mountain men pursue each other through backwoods Kentucky in a bloody tale of violence and revenge. Read full book review >
CHEATERS by Dean Albarelli
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Religion and ethnicity give some dimension to otherwise boilerplate narratives—a competent but unexciting debut."
Nine rather commonplace tales, most of them previously published in literary magazines, try on a couple of different voices but share a focus on loyalty, sexual and otherwise, and adultery. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >