Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

CLAY’S QUILT by Silas House
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 30, 2001

"An appealing and promising debut."
A Kentucky author's plaintive debut tells the story of coal miner Clay Sizemore's efforts to understand and possess his own history, shattered when he was a three-year-old present at his own mother's murder. Read full book review >
BACK FROM THE DEAD by Chris Petit
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 30, 2001

"Once again, Petit displays flashes of talent but remains a writer in search of a story."
A dreary, disjointed tale about a lovesick cop and other obsessive types, from the author of The Psalm Killer (1997). Read full book review >

THANKSGIVING by Michael Dibdin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 29, 2001

"Yet Dibdin's title turns out to be accurate after all: a tribute to the power of grace and gratitude to transform even the most blasted lives."
Quite a change of pace for the urbane creator of Roman detective Aurelio Zen (Blood Rain, 2000, etc.): a teasing, lacerating fable about a new widower maddened by grief. Read full book review >
COLUMBUS SLAUGHTERS BRAVES by Mark Friedman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 29, 2001

"A frustrating debut that doesn't reach nearly far enough. But don't bet that it won't become very, very popular."
Echoes of Bang the Drum Slowly, The Natural, and Brian's Song are heard throughout this literate weeper about an athlete dying young: an intermittently incisive though ultimately flat first novel. Read full book review >
ALWAYS COMING HOME by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 29, 2001

"And no one does this type of utopian near-allegory better."
LeGuin here focuses her inimitable world-building skills on two conflicting societies of the future—implying, of course, their relevance to the present. Read full book review >

THE UNEASY CHAIR by Wallace Stegner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 28, 2001

"We wondered 'why Stegner cares so much,' but in retrospect, the answer seems clearer."
Novelist Stegner tends to identify with writers like himself: westerners who try to forge a literary identity far from the East Coast establishment. Read full book review >
THE TRIUMPH OF KATIE BYRNE by Barbara Taylor Bradford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 27, 2001

"Bradford's chatterbox style and cast of thousands create nothing but confusion, but her fans probably won't care."
A ho-hum mystery of sorts from megaselling Bradford (A Sudden Change of Heart, 1999, etc.), this about a young actress who's haunted by a violent attack on her closest chums. Read full book review >
BOYS OF GOLD by George Brinley Evans
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 26, 2001

"Nothing here that surprises—but the author's painter's eye and flair for homely dialogue makes it all intensely real."
This slight, though affecting collection of seven partially linked short stories appears to be the fragmentary fictional autobiography of its Welsh author (also a noted painter and sculptor), whose wartime service in Burma and experiences as a coal miner are transcribed in such terse vignettes as "The End of Summer" (which describes a boy's first day in the mines) and the vivid title story, in which a young soldier's plaintive recall of boyhood adventures immediately precedes his death on the battlefield. Read full book review >
MAIDEN CASTLE by John Cowper Powys
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 2001

"A grandiose, preternaturally intuitive, frequently absurd, stunningly inventive novel, which, for all its resemblance to Dickens as well as Hardy, is unquestionably the work of an underrated and genuinely great writer."
Powys's (1872-1963) gargantuan novels—including Wolf Solent, A Glastonbury Romance, and this quaint and curious doorstopper (first published in 1936, now available in a "First Full Authoritative Edition")—are sprawling melodramas à la Thomas Hardy and D.H. Lawrence, infused with odd, often frustratingly obscure pantheistic and cosmic suggestiveness. Read full book review >
THE PARABLES OF JOSHUA by Joseph F. Girzone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 2001

"What curmudgeon would argue?"
Once there was a parablist named Joshua and at times his fresh new parables were received with open minds by reviewers (Joshua in the Holy Land, 1992) as Joshua brought peace to the strife-torn Middle East. Yet in still later sheaves, as Joshua set about reforming sin-laden New York City, reviewers felt an encroaching blandness wash over them (Joshua and the City, 1995). Read full book review >
THE VILLA by Nora Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2001

"A smooth blend of suspense and romance. As ever, the author's trademark effortless style keeps a complex plot moving without a hitch."
Megaselling Roberts (River's End, 1999, etc.) goes to Napa Valley for the tale of an Italian-American family wine producers rocked by scandal and a series of murders. Read full book review >
ON A BEAM OF LIGHT by Gene Brewer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2001

"Will you wonder if the very smart prot is real when you finish? Only if you're as young as Drew Barrymore in E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial."
Brewer brings back the 357-year-old visitor from another planet who first appeared in his debut novel, K-Pax (1995). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >