Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

CONJURING MAUD by Philip Danze
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

"Details of love and loss, and especially the images of Africa, are poignant enough here, but Maud—and all she represents—falls short of finding a separate place in the story, seen as she is only through her lover's heated gaze."
After a career in magazine copyediting, 72-year-old Danze spins a quietly moving tale of destiny and romance in colonial West Africa, as a young naval cadet encounters the unconventional woman who will be the love of his life. Read full book review >
CREATURES OF HABIT by Jill McCorkle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 2001

"Uneven in execution, but permeated with a mature understanding that our lives are an accumulation of moments—and we live most fully when we slow down to savor or recollect them."
In her third story volume, McCorkle (Final Vinyl Days, 1998, etc.) again demonstrates that there's room to grow in New Southern fiction as she explores various stages of human existence with emphasis on our kinship with animals. Read full book review >

LUCKY US by Joan Silber
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 2001

"Refreshingly unsentimental: Silber writes with a modest intimacy that brings her characters to heartbreaking clarity even as she remains true to the ambiguities that plague every life—and love."
Silber's acutely observed fourth (In My Other Life, 2000, etc.) follows the trail of emotions left behind an HIV diagnosis as it touches the lives of one New York City couple. Read full book review >
PALE HORSE COMING by Stephen Hunter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 2001

"A case of a successful formula overworked. The result? The pacing slackens noticeably, and the writing, particularly the dialogue, can seem downright slapdash."
The Hunter assembly line cranks out another of his gunzapoppin' thrillers. Read full book review >
DUGAN UNDER GROUND by Tom De Haven
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2001

"A shame, too, since Dugan Under Ground positively rattles with energy, invention, and roughhouse wit. It's chaotic—and quite wonderful."
The enigmatic life of a renegade cartoonist is and isn't revealed by the testimony of those who knew, loved, and hated him: a fascinating, frustrating partial sequel to De Haven's Funny Papers (1985) and Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies (1996). Read full book review >

THE MYSTIC ROSE by Stephen R. Lawhead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"No questions that would bother Graham Greene, but those lusting for the True Path will eat it up."
Final volume of the Celtic Crusades trilogy begun with The Iron Lance (1998), in which lawyer Gordon Murray was introduced as narrator of a Scottish generational saga, with Murdo Ranulfson, son of Lord Ranulf of Dyrness, Orkney, going off on the Crusades and finding the iron lance that stabbed Christ at the Crucifixion. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 2001 by Barbara Kingsolver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"A vibrant, diverse collection."
An excellent new edition of this popular anthology. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN MYSTERY STORIES 2001 by Lawrence Block
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"Proof that virtually any short story qualifies as a mystery if you want to read it that way."
The headline news in the fourth installment of this annual series (interrupted last year by The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century) is the relative absence of headliners; even editor Block admits that before reading their entries, he'd never heard of two-thirds of the contributors. Read full book review >
CALL ME MAGDALENA by Alicia Steimberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"Steimberg is one of Latin America's best writers."
All sorts of genres are imperturbably parodied in this witty, prizewinning 1992 novel from the Argentinean author of Musicians and Watchmakers. Read full book review >
TO BE SOMEONE by Louise Voss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2001

"Meandering and incoherent first outing from a music business insider."
Recuperating DJ writes—and writes and writes—her memoirs. Read full book review >
OCTOBER SUITE by Maxine Clair
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2001

"Some fine descriptive passages and a refreshingly nuanced portrait of African-Americans who are not obsessed by race, but the tale's overly studied quality suggests that this material has been worked over one too many times."
First-novelist Clair expands on several stories from Rattlebone (1994) to chronicle a decade in the life of a midwestern schoolteacher. Read full book review >
THE ARCHER’S TALE by Bernard Cornwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2001

"Another top effort from one of today's truly great storytellers. Please, oh please, let it be another series."
Cornwell picks a new epoch to play in and, to no one's surprise, has a ball. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >