Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

APOLOGIZING TO DOGS by Joe Coomer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"A sharply observant and engaging entertainment."
Thirty years" worth of secrets, most having to do with sex and love, are exposed in the course of one frantic day in this deftly plotted mix of comedy and romance. Read full book review >
BOCIANY by Chava Rosenfarb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But the trilogy's great character is Binele's resourceful mother Hindele Polin, a crafty widow whose hard-earned wisdom and plucky survival skills make her a worthy successor to the villager heroines of Sholom Aleichem's fiction."
Bociany ($29.95; Oct.; 432 pp.; 0-8156-0576-5) Polish-born novelist Rosenfarb's impressive urban epic was first published in the 1970s in three separate volumes later collectively entitled The Tree of Life. Read full book review >

WHERE THERE'S SMOKE by Mel McKinney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"The wildly far-fetched plot has its own internal logic, sharpened at every possible moment by the pungent aroma of fine cigars."
Newcomer McKinney embroiders a gossamer criminal fantasy on a single historical fact: President Kennedy's purchase of 1,100 Cuban cigars the night before he ordered the embargo of Cuba in July 1963. Read full book review >
THE LADIES' AUXILIARY by Tova Mirvis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"An impressive debut, up there on that high middle ground the Victorians made their own."
A debut that details, with wisdom and grace, the inevitable tensions between the comfort of community and the need for individual freedom, as a young widow and convert moves into a close-knit Orthodox Jewish neighborhood and becomes an unwitting catalyst for change. Read full book review >
PERV--A LOVE STORY by Jerry Stahl
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"While there's a tenderness amid the chaos, it's most often found in Bobby's descriptions of the troubles of others—which cascade down these pages in increasingly freakish colors."
Readers familiar with Stahl's Permanent Midnight (1995) will not be surprised to find his doped-out hero reaching epiphanies during an extended, drug-addled rape sequence that constitutes his "coming of age" in 1970. Read full book review >

HANGING CURVE by Troy Soos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Louis Cubs—and against the KKK and a city still sporting the five-year-old scars of the murderous race riots of 1917. (Author tour)"
Hanging Curve ($22.00; Oct.; 272 pp.; 1-57566-455-0) Journeyman infielder Mickey Rawlings's biggest innings have always been off the field, and it's no surprise that his sixth season (The Cincinnati Red Stalkings, 1998, etc.) will take him away from his current team, the St. Read full book review >
THE TWISTED ROOT by Anne Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"No writer since Agatha Christie has been so good at teasing her audience with such obvious questions until choosing to ring down the curtain. (Mystery Guild selection)"
Now that he's savoring the joys of marriage to unlicensed nurse Hester Latterly, enquiry agent William Monk (A Breach of Promise, 1998, etc.) is all the quicker to feel the distress of Lucius Stourbridge, whose fiancÇe, bewitching widow Miriam Gardiner, vanished from the middle of a croquet match at the Stourbridge home in Cleveland Square. Read full book review >
ONE HEART by Jane McCafferty
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Strong work from a writer to watch."
Loneliness is the dominant emotion in this sad, sensitive first novel by the author of a previous story collection (Director of the World, 1992). Read full book review >
THE LAW OF RETURN by Maxine Rodburg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

THE LAW OF RETURNShort StoriesRodburg, Maxine Read full book review >
MONSIEUR RENê by Peter Ustinov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Deft and steadily amusing."
The marvelously multidimensional Sir Peter—actor with two Oscars (Spartacus and Topkapi), director, memoirist, columnist, UNICEF ambassador at large, playwright (Romanoff and Juliet), novelist, and short-story writer (Life Is an Operetta, 1997)—tells of the widower M. RenÇ, Permanent President of the International Brotherhood of Concierges and Hall Porters, who has a splendid if dangerous idea. Read full book review >
NEELY JONES by M. K. Wren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"But though Neely has winning ways, helter-skelter plotting hurts her debut."
Good thing Cornelia Jones is a practicing realist; there's not much comfort in white-bread Westport, Oregon, for African-Americans like her. Read full book review >
THE MULTICULTIBOHO SIDESHOW by Alexs D. Pate
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"As with many book-length sermons, though, there are still some piquant and useful exhibits here."
Pate's fourth (Finding Makeba, 1997, etc.) is indeed a multicultural sideshow headlined by a struggling African-American writer who attempts to explain the death of a white, grant-giving benefactor to a cop. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >