Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

MICA HIGHWAYS by William Elliott Hazelgrove
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1998

"Not all bad by any means, but Hazelgrove really ought to start writing novels that other people haven't already written."
A well-constructed, intermittently moving, but awfully overwrought southern gothic melodrama by the author of Ripples (not reviewed) and Tobacco Sticks (1995). Read full book review >
D'ALEMBERT'S PRINCIPLE by Andrew Crumey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1998

"Something's gone awry with the charm of his storytelling."
A master of the postmodern fable, Crumey follows his exceptional novel Pfitz (1997) with a related, albeit more obscure, trio of interlocking stories derived in part from the troubled life of mathematician and philosopher Jean D'Alembert. Read full book review >

THE CAT by Pat Gray
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1998

"Gray's characters amuse in their parody of human beings, but not everyone will feel an urge to read secondary meanings into their trials."
Irish-born Gray's third is a dark and amusing political allegory about Cat, Rat, and Mouse, and how they get along after the sudden death of the Professor, the owner of Chez Maupassant. Read full book review >
THE LAST KING OF SCOTLAND by Giles Foden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1998

"Lurid and delightful, written with wit and real maturity. (First serial rights to Granta)"
A remarkable debut novel by British journalist Foden (The Guardian), who describes—in the best Conradian tones—an idealistic young physician's descent into the maelstrom of Idi Amin's Uganda. Read full book review >
STARLIGHT 2 by Patrick Nielsen Hayden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"Dynamic, often exceptional work, highly recommended for readers who can't bear to wait on the various annual 'best-ofs.'"
Another eclectic gathering of 13 all-new tales representing various styles, themes, approaches, and ideas (following Starlight 1, 1996). Read full book review >

THE GOLDEN RULE by Elizabeth Palmer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"A fine balm for winter."
The charm and surefire wit of Palmer's previous work (Flowering Judas, 1997, etc.) rise to the occasion once more, as a tangled web of London high society has at its center two sisters of vastly differing sensibilities—two now-grown women whose approaches to matters of the heart make life interesting for their men, their friends, and each other. Read full book review >
LET NOTHING YOU DISMAY by Mark O'Donnell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 8, 1998

"Only Knopf can know for sure."
It's December 20th, and poor gay Tad's love life is in a shambles. Read full book review >
DRINKER OF BLOOD by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1998

"Newcomers to Lord Meren's fine series of adventures are well-advised to start elsewhere."
Who killed Queen Nefertiti? Read full book review >
GATES OF EDEN by Ethan Coen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 1998

"Like this debut collection as a whole, though, it's a valuable portrait of the artist as a middle-aged neophyte."
Fourteen variously weird tales from the producing half of the Coen Brothers movie team. Read full book review >
THE CONVERSION by Aharon Appelfeld
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1998

"But its signal strength—his complex portrayal of a divided soul frustrated in its pursuit of goodness—once again confirms Appelfeld's position as matchless dramatist of the intermingled burdens and rewards of Jewry in extremis."
First published in 1991, this provocative parable is the 12th novel to reach English from the internationally acclaimed author of such fiction as Badenheim 1939 (1980) and (most recently) The Iron Tracks (1998). Read full book review >
MIRROR IMAGE by Danielle Steel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1998

"ClichÇ follows ever bolder clichÇ as the Steel style grinds out its mellow surprises for the blissfully half-asleep."
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Boyle is of course too young for a summing-up, but this seems as good a time as any for a mid-career display of the antic wares of our most versatile and prolific radical comedian."
A fine, fat gathering of 68 stories, including the contents of Boyle's four collections (Without a Hero, 1994, etc.), four more, uncollected, tales, and three previously unpublished. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >