Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

LICKING OUR WOUNDS by Elise D'Haene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Innumerable orgasms remembered in wet, sucking detail bid this fair-to-be-welcomed erotica, but to label it such would be grossly unfair, since the sexual excess commingles with witty, vibrantly frank views of a gay world darkened by AIDS, yet not without hope."
Striking an offbeat, bawdy note from the outset, first- novelist D`Haene presents a young lesbian in L.A. whose lover has decamped and whose vagina has gone numb—but this is just the beginning of a complex, heartfelt story. Read full book review >
NO BRAKES by Lois Gould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"But the story, alas, crashes and burns in a rushed, clumsy, unconvincing climax."
A nicely put-together thriller from the talented Gould (Medusa's Gift, 1991, etc.), who can play all the pieces like another Bobby Fischer—but can't check to save her soul. Read full book review >

PERFECT ANGEL by Seth Margolis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Labored, thin, and amazingly unsuspenseful. (First printing of 35,000; film rights to Paramount)"
A high-concept, low-output Imperiled Mom scenario from the author of Losing Isaiah (1993), etc. Margolis starts with a nifty premise. Read full book review >
MY BROTHER MICHAEL by Janis Owens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"A bit too schematic, but a refreshingly different take on fraternal rivalry."
A luminously written first novel that celebrates—not always convincingly—a surviving sibling's redemption and gratitude. Read full book review >
SHADOW OF THE WOLF by Harry James Plumlee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"A highly sympathetic view of the Apache way of life, but, since narrative concerns are sacrificed to details of tribal practice, the result is more interesting anthropology than compelling drama."
A well-meaning if tepid debut, set during the waning years of Apache glory, about a medicine man who proves a threat to white designs for the Indians' containment. Read full book review >

THE MURDER OF EDGAR ALLAN POE by George Egon Hatvary
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"But Edgarphiles may not be able to resist the conceit of his murder being avenged by his most famous fictional creation."
Not convinced by recent new reports that Poe died of rabies? Read full book review >
ASHWORTH HALL by Anne Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Fans of the series will be delighted. (Author tour)"
There's trouble afoot as negotiators open a crucial 1890 conference on the fate of Ireland. Read full book review >
BENDING THE LANDSCAPE by Nicola Griffith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Well and confidently crafted and often sexually challenging, but in other respects neither particularly original nor surprising."
From the Seattle-based Griffith (Slow River, 1995, etc.) and White Wolf publishing executive Pagel, the first of a gender- bending series of anthologies (a volume of sf stories and another of horror are projected) whose purpose is to have ``some queer writers write fantasy for the first time, and for some genre writers to explore queer characters,'' not to mention a table of contents set in a typeface so bizarre as to be almost indecipherable. Read full book review >
THE SOUND OF THE TRUMPET by Bill Moody
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1997

"There's never much mystery about who killed Perkins, but the tale of the tape gives Evan an excuse for some great duets with aging jazzmen with long memories, and a supporting role in the strangest confession ever recorded."
Is it live or Memorex—or a ringer? Read full book review >
A YEAR OF LESSER by David Bergen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1997

"There's enough sensitivity and restraint in the narration to keep the proceedings from turning into soap opera, but at times it's a close call."
First-timer Bergen offers a strong, evocative, but ultimately rather unmoving representation of a small prairie town in Canada and of the dramas that it contains. Read full book review >
TEXACO by Patrick Chamoiseau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1997

"Godspeed."
This dense, crowded, intricately constructed novel—a fictional history of the Caribbean underclass in the century-and-a- half since the abolition of slavery—won for Martinique's Chamoiseau the prestigious Goncourt Prize in 1993. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1997

"A fine addition to the author's generation-spanning saga, which, without undue fanfare, offers object lessons in such virtues as fidelity, honor, and tradition as well as a full measure of pulse-pounding action. (Radio satellite tour)"
An engrossing follow-up to Buffalo Soldiers (1996), the first in a series documenting the black experience in America's postCivil War military. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >