Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

TRUE BETRAYALS by Nora Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 13, 1995

"But Roberts's style has a fresh, contemporary snap that gets the story past its own worst excesses."
Thoroughbreds and Virginia blue-bloods cavort, commit murder, and fall in love in Roberts's (Hidden Riches, 1994, etc.) latest romantic thriller — this one set in the world of championship horse racing. Read full book review >
MOON CAKES by Andrea Louie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 12, 1995

"Still, a writer to watch."
A first novel as beautifully wrought but as emotionally remote as a stylized Chinese painting, detailing a young Chinese-American woman's bittersweet journey through memory and the present in search of meaning and self. Read full book review >

REDEMPTION by Leon Uris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 10, 1995

"For those who hung on Battle Cry, Exodus, Topaz, and other Uris offerings, then, a considerable disappointment."
A sequel to Trinity, Uris's 1976 bestseller, that's as great and chaotic a muddle as Ireland's lengthy struggle for independence — which again serves as backdrop for what's essentially a multifamily chronicle. Read full book review >
SOCIAL BLUNDERS by Tim Sandlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 9, 1995

"Good clean fun, but not much else."
In the final installment of his GroVont trilogy (Skipped Parts, 1991; Sorrow Floats, 1992), Sandlin completes the backwoods soap opera in which our hero loses his girl, searches for his father, and finally comes of age at 33. Read full book review >
SYNONYM FOR LOVE by Alison Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 1995

"A first-novelist's surefooted and affecting examination of abandonment's scars."
A complex and unsentimental portrait of a young woman confronting the searingly painful memories that constitute her identity—in a first novel from storywriter Moore (Small Spaces Between Emergencies, 1992). Read full book review >

A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND AND OTHER STORIES by Flannery O'Connor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 3, 1995

"Harper's Bazaar, and the New Yorker, and will cater to eclectic tastes."
This collection of short stories by the southerner whose first novel Wise Blood appeared in 1952 is more likely to attract readers who want to follow Miss O'Connor's writing progress rather than those who favor fiction in this form. Read full book review >
DEAD GIRLS by Richard Calder
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Wild, daring, confused, brash, pyrotechnic, but with some fascinating ideas bubbling up: an intriguing and encouraging debut."
Soon after the creation of lifelike robot women is perfected by Cartier, a mysterious virus absorbs their characteristics and infects human womenturning them into ``dead girls'' with doll-like roboticized bodies, but having the needs and habits of vampires. Read full book review >
THE BURNING by Frank Norwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Occasionally, though, the figures are raspy and restless enough for a reader to wish they'd been allowed to roam in a less gimmicky context. (First printing of 25,000; Literary Guild alternate)"
Shadows dance, flames fan wide, and sirens wail in LA's inner city when heavy-handed police action sparks a riot and a night of mayhem ensues—in this multifaceted and earnest, if uneven, debut from social-worker Norwood. Read full book review >
SPLITTING by Fay Weldon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Weldon in top form. (First printing of 50,000; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A darkly comic portrait of one woman's shattering response to divorce: the latest from an author rightly celebrated for writing witty cautionary tales about the contemporary sexual jungle (Trouble, 1993, etc.). ``It is my belief that we are suffering from a perforated personality,'' says Angelica, lying on her bed at London's Claridge's Hotel, and her other personalities—Jelly, Angel, and Lady Rice—all agree. Read full book review >
MICROSERFS by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Coupland may have defined his generation, but unless he injects something into it, his writing will remain sociology rather than literature. (First printing of 125,000; first serial to Wired; $120,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Gen-X guru Coupland's (Life after God, 1994, etc.) third offering is a sprawling, amiable novel filled with the deracinated underachievers who have given their author both audience and theme. Read full book review >
BLACKENING SONG by Aimée Thurlo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"The real pleasure here is in the complex depiction of cultural conflict and assimilation."
Racism and religious fanaticism make for strong villains in a promising suspense-series debut by the Thurlos (Second Shadow, 1993, not reviewed). Read full book review >
WHOM THE GODS LOVE by Kate Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Despite its ingenuity and its engaging cast, the most conventional of Julian's three adventures to date. (Author tour)"
Alexander Falkland was all things to all people: a devoted son to his titled father, with whom he enjoyed a richly philosophical correspondence on morality and the law; a loving husband to his wealthy wife, Belinda; a generous employer to his loyal servants; a charismatic friend to a wide circle of Regency society—a debtor whose principal creditor, for instance, just forgave him a debt of ú30,000. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >