Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

LILI by Annie Wang
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"A moving and well-crafted tale, written over the course of ten years, that successfully melds the fictional Lili with China's recent history. Not an easy task."
Wang's first novel written in English: a compelling account of the emotional and political awakening of a tormented young Chinese woman who grew up during the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >
THE DEVIL WENT DOWN TO AUSTIN by Rick Riordan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"Riordan, who left his mark with his hardcover debut (The Last King of Texas, 2000), has to get sharper to reach the front rank."
Tres Navarre, the anomalous p.i. with a Ph.D in medieval lit, learns from the family banker that he has to leap into the breach yet again as his brother's keeper. Read full book review >

THINKS . . .  by David Lodge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"As engrossing as Lodge's skillful structuring and bawdy badinage is, this time out he promises more than he ultimately delivers."
Literature and science battle for supremacy in this three-pronged academic satire from Lodge (Home Truths, 2000, etc.) that gets in many a good jab before running out of steam. Read full book review >
MR. MAYBE by Jane Green
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"A minute-by-minute account with no detail left out—but still less is here than meets the eye."
Breathless, talky, class-conscious romance from the British author of Jemima J (2000). Read full book review >
DOWN BY THE WATER by Caroline Upcher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

"A light touch and appealing style make for a standout beach-read."
British novelist Upcher, now based on Long Island, debuts here with the story of a real-estate agent and harried mother who hires a nanny—and finds happiness in the Hamptons. Read full book review >

BOY TOY by Michael Craft
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"The mystery, in fact, barely holds a candle to Craft's latest paean to gay life in the suburbs."
Life goes on in Dumont, Wisconsin. Read full book review >
OUR ARCADIA by Robin Lippincott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"Good raw material turned into treacle."
A foray into early gay American history that occasionally hits its mark but is ultimately undone by the cloying preciousness of its characters and an author who too often takes the easy way out. Read full book review >
ALL THE FINEST GIRLS by Alexandra Styron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"Despite many gorgeous turns of phrase and Styron's masterful use of Caribbean dialect, All the Finest Girls is undone by labored plotting and the sulky narrator-heroine's lack of self-awareness—not to mention plain old awareness."
Disappointing debut fiction from the daughter of William Styron: the story of a poor little rich girl who realizes that her beloved black nanny had a life outside her family's palatial Connecticut home. Read full book review >
GUNMAN’S RHAPSODY by Robert B. Parker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"Goes on a bit after that climactic showdown, which is probably a mistake. But for the most part the action bristles, the talk is excellent, and the characters hold you: a much better than OK ride."
It's those lead-slinging Earps—revisited and revitalized—strapping it on again in Parker's first western. Read full book review >
BEST FRIENDS by Martha Moody
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"Despite good intentions, more about the idea of a friendship than the reality."
An energetic, if not always persuasive, attempt to detail why a friendship made in college between two women endures despite family scandals, different lifestyles, and the men they marry and divorce. Read full book review >
THE SONGCATCHER by Sharyn McCrumb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2001

"McCrumb's latest in her ballad series (The Ballad of Frankie Silver, 1998, etc.) is as rich and dense as Scotch shortbread, filled with humor and surprise as it spans two continents and nearly three centuries."
Kidnapped as a child from his home in the Scottish island of Islay, Malcolm MacCourry brought three things with him to the New World: a stone from Iona, the Holy Isle, to guard against drowning; a curse that no MacCourry will love his firstborn child best; and a song. Read full book review >
BEL CANTO by Ann Patchett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 2, 2001

"Brilliant."
Combining an unerring instinct for telling detail with the broader brushstrokes you need to tackle issues of culture and politics, Patchett (The Magician's Assistant, 1997, etc.) creates a remarkably compelling chronicle of a multinational group of the rich and powerful held hostage for months. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >