Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

CROWFOOT RIDGE by Ann Brandt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 1999

"Avery's past are braided neatly together."
Everything is pitched just a mite too high in this first novel that was originally self-published: an Oprahratic weeper about a Florida woman's recovery from her life of ill-gotten wealth and comfort. Read full book review >
SECOND HAND SMOKE by Thane Rosenbaum
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 1999

"It's difficult, though, to credit a reconciliation that involves proper breathing techniques, the alignment of chakras, and a great, dewy-eyed group hug around the gravesite of a departed matriarch."
Tikkun literary editor Rosenbaum's debut novel is again, like his earlier collection of stories (Elijah Visible, 1996), an autobiographically influenced account of the burdens shouldered by children of Holocaust survivors. Read full book review >

NIGHT DUTY by Melitta Breznik
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 11, 1999

A fragmentary, elliptical story of family unhappiness emerges from the tormented consciousness of a hardworking woman doctor—in this compact and very affecting first novel by an Austrian psychiatrist. Read full book review >
A KISS IN SPACE by Mary Jo Salter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 1999

"Salter's formal skills often compensate for her slender vision."
A lecturer at Mount Holyoke, the author of three previous volumes of verse, and a co-editor of the Norton Anthology of Poetry, Salter continues to write charming and transparent poems, many bearing a bluestocking wit and the sensibility of a smart coed. Read full book review >
MEETING LUCIANO by Anna Esaki-Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 1999

"A good beginning."
A debut novel describing the coming-of-age of a young Japanese-American woman who must deal with her aging mother's withdrawal into a private world of her own fantasies. Read full book review >

GROUCHO MARX, PRIVATE EYE by Ron Goulart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 1999

"Still, it's refreshing to spend another couple of hours in 1938 Hollywood, where the Third Reich is a distant rumble and the most minor characters, from whores to countermen, identify themselves as actors."
His heartless producers have renamed Groucho Marx's radio show, dug him up a new sponsor—Mullens Pudding, which brags about coming in five flavorful flavors—and stuck him with a horrid supporting actress, Polly Pilgrim, who plays his daughter on the air and his scourge everywhere else. Read full book review >
SACRIFICE by Todd Gitlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1999

"Paul's part in this fractured tale is often heavy-going, but Chester's journals and the world they evoke provide a fine portrait of a tortured soul who, wholly by accident and only for a moment, found paradise."
Culture-critic Gitlin takes another stab at fiction (The Murder of Albert Einstein, 1992), surpassing his earlier effort with the story of a long-strained father-son relationship, fathomed only after the father's suicide. Read full book review >
THE DEATH OF A CONSTANT LOVER by Lev Raphael
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1999

"In the end, cutting back on the gossip that dominated Let's Get Criminal (1996) and The Edith Wharton Murders (1997) leaves room for the exploration of character that makes this Raphael's strongest book yet."
The worthy staff of the mythical State University of Michigan at Michiganapolis, always glancing back nervously over their shoulders at their colleagues at Ann Arbor, are giving them a run for their money in one important measure: homicide. Read full book review >
GO WEST YOUNG F*CKED-UP CHICK by Rachel Resnick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1999

"An apocalyptic Wiley Coyote cartoon, or a lipstick kiss on a napkin kept in a bureau as a souvenir of hapless days when you were underpaid, little-known, and shivering."
Hollywood first novel, bravely bizarre and splintered as a mosaic, like pieces of Bruce Wagner and Nathanael West glued into a window sunlit with despair. Read full book review >
CHOCOLATE LIZARDS by Cole Thompson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1999

"Affable and fun: Thompson's portrayal of an innocent gone (very) far abroad proves irresistibly readable."
A debut novel recounting a young man's sudden initiation into the real world—via the oil fields of central Texas. Read full book review >
NIGHT GARDENING by E.L. Swann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 1999

"Many a stylistic stumble, a paper-thin male lead, and much horticulture aimed straight at the sentimental."
Children's writer Kathryn Lasky becomes E.L. Swann to author this adult melodrama about declining families, thankless children, and, above all, blossoming love in the golden years. Read full book review >
THREE HANDS IN THE FOUNTAIN by Lindsey Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 6, 1999

"The puzzle and its resolution are only marginally convincing, but the evocation of ancient Rome—almost street by street'should prove a treasure to readers interested in the era."
It's the reign of Emperor Vespasian in first century Rome, and informer/spy/p.i. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >