Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

GRIMM’S LAST FAIRYTALE by Haydn Middleton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Images gutter in candleflame or rise in snowlight through smeared windowpanes in storytelling so quiet that, in Middleton's words, 'you can hear a heart-string snap': a modern fairy tale that should last at least a hundred years."
A magically rich fictionalizing of the lives of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, interwoven with a retelling of Sleeping Beauty, by a prolific children's and adult author (The Collapsing Castle, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
THE BIRTHDAY OF THE WORLD by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Pure starlight."
Eight stories, including seven reprints and a never-before-published novella, by the masterful Le Guin (The Telling, 2000, etc.), who has racked some SF and fantasy classics onto her shelf since receiving her first rejection slip, at age 11, from Amazing Stories. Read full book review >

BLOOD OF MY BLOOD by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"A bleak, defiant, bare-knuckles read that will you exhausted by its relentlessly unsympathetic characters. Still, it provides enormously interesting insights into its author's work."
A long-lost unpublished first novel by the author of The Yearling chronicles the malevolent self-sacrifice of a life-blunted wife and mother for her ungracious writer daughter. Read full book review >
BORDER CROSSING by Pat Barker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Not one of Barker's triumphs. She's a gifted realist who usually excels at putting flesh on the bones of what might seem mere case histories, but Border Crossing is really only a return visit to previously explored fictional territory."
A former child murderer's relationship with the psychologist whose testimony had assured his conviction and imprisonment is the core of this intriguing, melodramatic, and rather diffused eighth novel from the British author of the award-winning Regeneration Trilogy. Read full book review >
THE CROWN OF SILENCE by Storm Constantine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"An uncontrolled and unconvincing continuation: dedicated fans only."
Second entry in Constantine's—trilogy? series?—about the aggressively expansionist Magravandian Empire (Sea Dragon Heir, 2000) and the people who scheme to run it, change it, or bring about its downfall. Read full book review >

BURDEN by Tony Walters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Good sloppy fun: A well-paced, believable, and genuinely funny story that manages to make a few nice points along the way."
A genial first outing, laced with regional flavor and black humor, about a grief-stricken young man's attempts to get himself killed in flagrante delicto. Read full book review >
TILTING AT WINDMILLS by Joseph Pittman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Tepid, get-out-the-Kleenex romance, riddled with greeting-card profundities and one too many windmill metaphors from a writer who is certainly no Cervantes."
A dreary debut about a young man who abandons Manhattan for a new life—and love—in a small town upstate. Read full book review >
RISPONDIMI by Susanna Tamaro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Holy abstractions brightened by dollops of sex and violence."
Three novellas set in the author's native Italy and connected by spiritual/religious themes of good and evil, love and redemption. Read full book review >
RETURNING LOST LOVES by Yehoshua Kenaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Beautifully structured, and an eye-opening composite portrayal of a culture whose complexities we barely comprehend."
One thinks of Grand Hotel, or perhaps Terence Rattigan's popular play Separate Tables, while reading this entertaining Israeli novel, which joins in English translation its acclaimed author's earlier Musical Moment and The Way to the Cats. Read full book review >
DARK AS DAY by Charles Sheffield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"So far, it's developing into Sheffield's best series to date."
By 2097, as the solar system recovers from the catastrophic Great War, the stunningly powerful quantum-entangled computer network known as the Seine comes back to life. Read full book review >
THE WHITE CROW by Cynthia Peale
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Peale wraps up her Ames trilogy (The Death of Colonel Mann, 2000; Murder at Bertram's Bower, 2001) with enough plot recaps, dreary romantic snippets, and coincidences to clog up Boston Harbor."
In a darkened room in a house on Victorian Boston's Lime Street, Caroline Ames, wistfully hoping to contact the mother who has passed over, clasps the hands of Dr. John MacKenzie, the shy beau who sits to her right, and of philanthropist Theophilus Clay on her left as she listens to medium Evangeline Sidgwick's "control" Roland as he interprets messages from the spirit world. Read full book review >
SHACKLING WATER by Adam Mansbach
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"A wonderful accomplishment."
Spoken-word artist and musician Mansbach debuts with the lyric story of a young tenor sax player exploring both the modern New York jazz scene and the experience of being a musician. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >