Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"A few tales are sometimes strained in execution and concept, but mostly this felicitously translated collection is a welcome introduction to a wealth of hitherto unfamiliar talent."
A sometimes uneven collection of over 40 stories by Latin American women, demonstrating that magic realism is rather a shared response to the region's landscape and history than the exclusive property of male writers like Borges and Garc°a M†rquez. Read full book review >
THE LAST PENDRAGON by Robert Rice
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"An absorbing whirl of a read."
A persuasive reinvention of the Arthurian legend from Montana writer Rice—whose first novel is replete with the requisite great battles, great loves, and appropriately larger-than-life cast of heroes and villains. Read full book review >

FOUR BARE LEGS IN A BED by Helen Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Simpson's talent should improve with age."
Beautiful young Englishwomen and the men who disappoint them populate this tart and bitter debut collection by a former model and Vogue staff writer living in London—winner of the Somerset Maugham Award. ``I lay on the bed looking over my shoulder through a tangle of hair, across my dipping breast down to thighs like swan's wings. Read full book review >
RAINBOWS by Katherine Stone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Fairy-tale elements mix with those of a present-day romance- -for wholly improbable yet thoroughly enjoyable results."
An intricately plotted contemporary romance that marks the hardcover debut of bestselling paperback author Stone. Read full book review >
MOON OVER MINNEAPOLIS by Fay Weldon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"She's still one of the funniest, smartest iconoclasts around."
This wild and tonic assortment of tales arrives like a flotilla escorting the author's new novel, Life Force (see above), though many of the stories included originally appeared in British and American women's magazines like Lear's and Elle. Read full book review >

CROSSOVER by Dennis A. Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Still, in light of recent interest in African- American manhood, a timely and evocative portrait of the black male experience in the formative years."
A solid, insightful debut from Cornell prof and ex-Newsweek editor Williams, chronicling a young black man's political awakening at an Ivy League college during the stormy years of the early 1970's. Read full book review >
BILLY BRAZIL by Emilio DeGrazia
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Powerful and haunting—a work of great integrity."
An English professor's encounter with a schizophrenic student forces him to reconsider what it means to be human—in an absorbing first novel by the author of the story collection Enemy Country (1984). Read full book review >
WINTER ROADS, SUMMER FIELDS by Marjorie Dorner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Some of these originally appeared in literary magazines such as Great River Review."
Twelve literary tales by mystery-writer Dorner (Freeze Frame, 1990, etc.) covering some 50 years in the history of a family farming community in Wisconsin—a first collection that, at its best, is a haunting evocation of mortality and its contingencies. Read full book review >
LUCKY'S LADY by Tami Hoag
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Lots of sex, just the right amount of suspense, and a sassy, crackling prose style—in a romance that should more than satisfy devotees of the genre."
Second hardcover romance (Magic, 1990—not reviewed) from veteran author Hoag—a steamy, modern romance set in the Louisiana bayou country. Read full book review >
GHOSTS by Morio Kita
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Much fine writing, as nature and a beloved past are evoked, but the narrator's claustrophobic obsessions ultimately overwhelm the theme."
Here, in lyrical, if at times cloyingly intense, prose, the narrator of Japanese writer Kita's latest (The House of Nire, 1984- -not reviewed) exorcises a lost past through nature and the imagination. Read full book review >
STORIES FROM IRAN by Heshmat Moayyad
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Rich in imagery and symbols, stories that—despite some uneven writing—do much to explain a country whose recent history has so devastatingly impinged on our own."
With an essay by editor Moayyad (Persian Literature/Univ. of Chicago), this anthology is not only a timely introduction to an unfamiliar literature but offers as well illuminating insights into a society where the postmodern and pre-Renaissance still uneasily coexist. Read full book review >
MONDAY'S WARRIORS by Maurice Shadbolt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Suffers occasionally—but not fatally—from low blood pressure."
An American deserts Queen Victoria's army to cast his lot with Maoris fighting to keep their rightful share of New Zealand—in another historical novel by the author of Season of the Jew (1987), etc. Wary readers will encounter none of the bogus reverence that is the curse of most American aboriginal epics in this dry, mildly overlong story of the Maoris' hopeless fight to hold off total European settlement and dominance of their island. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >