Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

HOLLOW CROWN by David Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"But he's strongest when he's documenting workers' marches, Mosley's rantings, the King's pro-Hitler proclivities, and the unsuitability of Mrs. Simpson as Queen."
On a bone-chilling October weekend in 1936, drafty Haling Castle, sparingly refurbished by conservative MP Leo Scannon, is the site of a less-than-amiable house party attended by several pro-Hitlerites, an American millionaire, an English bounder, a lord, another MP, an economist, a beautiful seductress, assorted wives, and plummy Edward Corinth. Read full book review >
CROUCHING BUZZARD, LEAPING LOON by Donna Andrews
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Even so, Andrews is unlikely ever to find a setting better suited to her brand of frantically inventive farce than Silicon Valley East."
Bereft of her drama teacher sweetie, off filming a TV series, blacksmith/amateur sleuth Meg Langslow (Revenge of the Wrought-Iron Flamingoes, 2001, etc.) has gone undercover as an office manager at her brother Rob's suburban Virginia software firm because he thinks something's fishy. Read full book review >

THE BANQUET IN BLITVA by Miroslav Krleza
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Difficult, but much worth reading as an introduction to an unjustly neglected European master."
A great Croatian writer is seen at his most animated and unsparing in a venomous satire (first published in 1939) on political aggrandizement and xenophobia. Read full book review >
HADES’ DAUGHTER by Sara Douglass
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A soap opera of the ancient world, for good and for bad."
Those old Greek myths covered a lot of territory, but there was just so much space left to fill that it's surprising more authors haven't taken the chance to do so. Read full book review >
AS MEAT LOVES SALT by Maria McCann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A genre-transcending, irreplaceable work: historical fiction at its very best."
It's hard to believe that this accomplished and potent historical tale is a first novel—a sentiment repeatedly echoed by the rapturous reviews that greeted its initial publication in England in 2001. Read full book review >

RETURNING AS SHADOWS by Paco Ignacio Taibo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Even readers unacquainted with the earlier authors Taibo is channeling, from Cervantes to Borges to Umberto Eco, will find something to love in this Frederick Forsyth yarn reworked by Monty Python."
Not many people know this, but the four raffish heroes of The Shadow of a Shadow (1991) returned 20 years later to battle the Nazis in 1941 Mexico, as Taibo recounts in this outrageous palimpsest of wartime intrigue. Read full book review >
SIX EASY PIECES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Despite the repetition, readers who missed these meaty, powerful stories in their paperback debuts will gobble them up at one sitting."
Even though six of the seven color-coded stories here have already appeared as pendants to recent paperback reprints of Mosley's first six Easy Rawlins novels, it's a special pleasure to have them all gathered together with the brand-new "Amber Gate," whose inquiry into the murder of much-loved prostitute Jackie Jay makes it the closest thing to a whodunit Mosley (Bad Boy Brawly Brown, p. 709, etc.) has yet produced. Read full book review >
TOUGH LUCK by Jason Starr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Starr (Hard Feelings, 2002, etc.) piles on the misery relentlessly in his latest black-on-black entry."
Mickey Prada can't catch a break. Read full book review >
DORIAN by Will Self
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Works of art may overcome the living here, but artifice and insufferable blather do the job on its reader."
Reduced to a shadow of his former self in imitating Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, Self (How the Dead Live, 2000) vaults into life's viscera to lampoon England's upper crust while skipping across the art/drug/gay culture on both sides of the Atlantic. Read full book review >
DUEL by Richard Matheson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Pulps no longer: much more like Poe."
Matheson, now entering his later years, has been on a roll of late, especially with his last novel, Hunted Past Reason (p. 691). Read full book review >
ADÈLE by Emma Tennant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Delightful may not be the word, but this is certainly lots of fun. Despite the odds, Tennant's story works perfectly, creating a genuine modern sequel to Brontë's tale that's neither a parody nor a cheap imitation."
After two sequels to Pride and Prejudice (Pemberley, 1993; An Unequal Marriage, 1994) and one to Emma (1998), Tennant retells Jane Eyre from the perspective of, mainly, Rochester's daughter Adèle. Read full book review >
ALONG CAME MARY by Jo-Ann Mapson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A slight sophomore slump in the series, but enough heart and soul to bring most of Mapson's fans back for installment number three to see how she ties up all those loose ends."
Despite some lurid plot premises and extremely convenient coincidences, the feisty characters and rueful emotional wisdom of this sequel will win over all but the hardest-hearted reader. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >