Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

PAPA'S CORD by Mary Pleshette Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 1999

"A literate soap opera, decently done but unremarkable."
A lugubrious first novel describing the slow coming of age of a Jewish-American Princess in Manhattan during the 1960s and "70s. Read full book review >
A MORTAL BANE by Roberta Gellis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"Burdened with endless details of church rituals and politics and a set of rather dull minor characters, this first mystery by fantasist Gellis is heavy-going despite its intriguing heroine."
In 12th-century London, the Bishop of Winchester, head of St. Read full book review >

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTHThe Year's Best, 1999Ravenel, Shannon—Ed. Read full book review >
MEN ON THE MOON by Simon J. Ortiz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"All of them, though, exhibit Ortiz's considerable vigor and demonstrate his influence on the many Native American writers who have emerged since he began publishing."
paper 0-8165-1930-7 Ortiz, a member of the Acoma tribe of the Southwest, is best known as a prolific and highly original poet, but he has also, since the 1960s, been publishing short stories, his three collections now gathered in one volume. Read full book review >
THE WATERMAN by Tim Junkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"Landlubbers steer clear."
Debut novel from a Washington, D.C., lawyer that tries to give an insider's view of life among the watermen who work the Chesapeake Bay. Read full book review >

NADIRS by Herta Müller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1999

"MÅller is a fearless writer, whose tales are steeped in ugly confrontational detail; one thinks, here and there, of Jerzy Kosinski's The Painted Bird, but Nadirs (so named for the 'low lands' that are its specific locale) is a work of striking originality and power."
paper 0-8032-8254-0 Nadirs ($35.00; paper $13.00; Sept. 8; 134 pp.; 0-8032-3197-0; paper 0-8032-8254-0): This 1982 collection of 15 related stories—the first book published by the Romanian-born author of The Land of Green Plums (1996), etc.—is an episodic history of Romanian village life under Communist domination; a child's-eye view of family unhappiness and conflict symbolic of larger disturbances (most vividly presented in the long title story), juxtaposing painful personal history ("The Funeral Sermon") against more generalized images of irrepressible sexuality and violence both in human beings and in the natural world ("Rotten Pears," "The Man with the Matchbox"). Read full book review >
REMEMBER ME by Laura Hendrie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1999

"A bracingly tough-minded and authentically moving work. (Author tour)"
An alternately witty and angry dissection of small-town life on the high desert country of New Mexico, and a celebration of the conflicting drives toward independence and belonging. Read full book review >
MARK TWAIN REMEMBERS by Thomas Hauser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1999

"Regrettably, Hauser's Twain doesn—t write as well as the original, and the novel is riddled with lengthy passages of history that read like a college textbook—and with clichÇs that Twain would surely have eschewed."
In his first novel in eight years (The Hawthorne Group, 1991), the author of Muhammad Ali (1991) and other nonfiction draws heavily on his interest in boxing. Read full book review >
A BENCH ON WHICH TO REST by Elena Maccaferri
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1999

"Maccaferri's unpretentious tale (it's really not a 'diary') isn't new, but does effectively memorialize the optimism and faith, as well as the reality, of the modern immigrant experience in (North) America."
A Bench On Which To Rest ($15.00; Sept. 8; 128 pp.; 1-928746-02-0): First published in 1976, and now translated by its author's granddaughter, this is the disarmingly simple story of an Italian woman's emigration to Canada (in the 1930s) to marry a man who has instead deserted her, and of the life she makes, without him, though without ever forgetting him or their homeland. Read full book review >
A GESTURE LIFE by Chang-rae Lee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"Lee is a writer of exquisite intimacy and delicate disclosures—and in Hata, he's found the perfect means to explore these gifts."
From the author of the award-winning Native Speaker (1995), a remarkable portrait of a distinctively tragic, expansive man coming of age in America. Read full book review >
999 by Al Sarrantonio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"Perhaps not quite the literary benchmark editor Sarrantonio hopes—nor is its excellence as consistent as some annuals by female editors of erotic suspense and vampire tales—but it will certainly be around for decades. ($200,000 ad/promo)"
Following the steps of groundbreaking anthologies such as Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions (not reviewed) and Kirby McCauley's Dark Forces (1980), this major publication of supernatural horror and nonsupernatural suspense offers 27 original works (no reprints) by Young Turks and top authors in the field. Read full book review >
A SIGNAL SHATTERED by Eric S. Nylund
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"But, nonetheless, mind-bogglingly inventive, with astounding special effects and a headlong, pulse-pounding, do-or-die narrative."
Sequel to Nylund's VR/alien-contact yarn, Signal to Noise (1998). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >