Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1823)

SHOW WORLD by Wilton Barnhardt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 30, 1998

"Barnhardt is better than this. (Author tour)"
The story of a hopeful young woman's disillusioning descent through the worlds of academe, politics, and film makes for a curious hybrid that falls awkwardly between the romantic comedy of Barnhardt's ingratiating first novel (Emma Who Saved My Life, 1989) and the baroque overkill that flattened his second (Gospel, 1993) Samantha Flint (whose notebooks record her story) arrives at Smith College in 1978 from Missouri, a self-conscious thorn among the pampered, whiny roses whose company she seeks. Read full book review >
MASQUERADE by Walter Satterthwait
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 28, 1998

"A decorative, dizzying trifle—the locked-room murder is solved with insulting casualness—that's chock-full of the stuff that made the Twenties roar."
The official verdict on poet/publisher Richard Forsythe and his latest amoureuse, Sabine von Stuben, is that their deaths were the result of a suicide pact in their bolted Paris hotel room. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 1998

"There are at least a dozen more fine stories in their unusual and satisfying anthology."
paper 0-8229-5661-6 A richly varied, if somewhat uneven, collection of 35 stories by as many postwar writers, only a handful of whom (e.g., Danile Ki—, Miodrag Bulatovi—, and Milorad Pavi—) are well known in English translation. Read full book review >
THE WOODSTOCK MURDERS by Jon Froscher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 1998

"Gay' only begins to describe a latter-day Woodstock as consistently fey as if the whole town were made out of gingerbread."
What ought to be the biggest celebration in Woodstock in 30 years—the arrival of those pillars of the American musical theater, Sam and Wendy Gayle Schaeffer (think Comden and Green, think Nichols and May) at Appletop, the estate they've just bought—is marred, as usual, by the lowlife Driver family. Read full book review >
THE FALL OF A SPARROW by Robert Hellenga
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 21, 1998

A thoroughly absorbing and deeply moving consideration of "the strength of love" matched against "the strength of death" dominates this wonderful second novel by the author of the widely acclaimed The Sixteen Pleasures (1994). Read full book review >

DISPATCHES FROM THE COLD by Leonard Chang
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 20, 1998

"Chang is an exceptionally talented writer, but his story would have been powerful and angry enough without a disruptingly fancy, and not wholly convincing, narrative device."
More blue-collar realism from the author of The Fruit ‘N Food (1997, not reviewed). Read full book review >
MISSING WOMEN AND OTHERS by June Spence
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 20, 1998

"A promising debut."
A first collection from the winner of the 1995 Willa Cather Fiction contest: 15 stories, some having appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Seventeen, and The Oxford Review, by a southern writer who excels at charting the minor victories that briefly relieve dreary lives. Read full book review >
FIREBIRD by Janice Graham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 20, 1998

"Graham's body-switch gimmick is certainly a weird one, but her unabashed passion for cowboys, French wine, and all things romantic may win her an enthusiastic following. (First printing of 150,000; Literary Guild Main selection; $400,000 ad/promo; author tour before publication)"
First-timer Graham crosses lust with New Age longings in a hybrid-romance about a violinist who wins her man only after she dies. Read full book review >
CRANE SPREADS WINGS by Susan Trott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 1998

"An exuberant, weightless New Age beach book, perfect for fans of Holly Golightly and other free spirits; for more serious readers, an ice-cream headache. (Author tour)"
Whimsical to the point of fluff, but kind of fun nonetheless: the story of how a ditzy, Tai Chi—practicing, failed art historian becomes a bigamist and a single mother. Read full book review >
WHERE SHE HAS GONE by Nino Ricci
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1998

"An extended work that rivals Pat Barker's much better known WWI trilogy, and a saga of the immigrant experience that is unrivaled in English (and, very likely, Italian)."
This beautifully written, quietly moving story impressively completes Italian-Canadian novelist Ricci's autobiographical trilogy (The Book of Saints, 1991; In a Glass House, 1995). Read full book review >
GONE TO TEXAS by Don Wright
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 14, 1998

"Wright's most astute work, with dialogue like coffee you could float a boot in, although the prose at times decays with stock phrases."
Another historical western from Wright (The Woodsman, paper, 1986; The Captives, 1987, etc.), this time about rebel boys Peyton Lewis and Fletcher Rucker, who join Frank and Jesse James in their first broad-daylight, easy-as-pie, post—Civil War bank robbery. Read full book review >
THE SILENT by Jack Dann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1998

"Still, Dann's anger, and his portrait of combat's sheer horrors, make for a vivid—and disturbing—read."
A ferocious portrait of the Civil War's human toll. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >