Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2)

THE MIRACLE GIRL by Andrew Roe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"Lively, pitch-perfect and assured. Readers will be wanting to hear more from this writer."
Personal tragedy meets the tragedy of our time in Roe's winning debut novel. Read full book review >
GOD HELP THE CHILD by Toni Morrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A chilling oracle and a lively storyteller, Nobel winner Morrison continues the work she began 45 years ago with The Bluest Eye."
Brutality, racism and lies are relieved by moments of connection in Morrison's latest. Read full book review >

ONE SEASON OF HOPE by Jim Stovall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A heartwarming story that's 'a little bit about football and an awful lot about life.'"
A novel about small-town high school football, life lessons, and President Harry S. Truman. Read full book review >
PLEASANTVILLE by Attica Locke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A thriller wrapped in an involving story of community and family dynamics. Locke serves up a panorama of nuanced characters and writes with intelligence and depth."
Race, politics and petty grievances muddy the quest for justice when a young election volunteer is kidnapped and murdered. Read full book review >
ONE NIGHT by Eric Jerome Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"Unflinching in its acceptance of bad behavior by likable characters, Dickey's latest will thrill his fans."
A chance encounter leads to one night of passion—and spiritual redemption—between strangers. Read full book review >

THE TURNER HOUSE by Angela Flournoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A talent to watch."
A complicated portrait of the modern American family emerges in Flournoy's debut novel. Read full book review >
THE THRILLING ADVENTURES OF LOVELACE AND BABBAGE by Sydney Padua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A prodigious feat of historically based fantasy that engages on a number of levels."
An audaciously imagined alternate history of the invention of the computer—in 19th-century Victorian England. Read full book review >
CHALLENGER DEEP by Neal Shusterman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"An adventure in perspective as well as plot, this unusual foray into schizophrenia should leave readers with a deeper understanding of the condition. (author's note) (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Fantasy becomes reality in an exploration of mental illness based partly on the experiences of the author's son, who is also the book's illustrator. Read full book review >
INHERITANCES by William Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 2015

"Black is at his best as a social realist in a blue-collar milieu; elsewhere, the strain shows."
It used to be Pennsylvania coal country, and even now that the mining jobs have gone, many in Black's first story collection find it hard to leave. Read full book review >
PARIS RED by Maureen Gibbon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 2015

"Fans of art history, Paris and contemporary Künstleroman like Girl With a Pearl Earring will enjoy the new perspective and the strong female voice."
Manet's muse ponders color, power, sex and love in vibrant 1860s Paris. Read full book review >
Toro! by Frank C. Schwalbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 2015

"Shines a light on criminal and bureaucratic complexities in an unusual, poignant narrative that would benefit from a more polished style."
A stripper becomes a med student after suffering a near-fatal attack by the titular Toro, but the past has an odd way of resurfacing. Read full book review >
RIDING IN CARS WITH GIRLS by Evangeline Jennings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 16, 2015

"A smashing, original collection likely to be read again and again."
Disenchanted characters find violence—or dispatch it—behind the wheel in Jennings' (Generic Airport Thriller, 2014, etc.) collection of crime-noir tales. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >