Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2)

THE SILVER WITCH by Paula Brackston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A stunning setting and bewitching premise make this book appealing, but Brackston's execution falls short of its mark."
Grief, magic and the ancient world collide in Brackston's (The Midnight Witch, 2014, etc.) fourth novel.Read full book review >
THIS IS HOW IT REALLY SOUNDS by Stuart Archer Cohen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"Anyone who's bet his or her future on Wall Street, strapped on a pair of skis or savored a well-told story will want to read this one."
An impressive and dramatic novel about three men who share a surname and intertwining fortunes. Read full book review >

THE MIRACLE GIRL by Andrew Roe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"Lively, pitch-perfect and assured. Readers will be wanting to hear more from this writer."
Personal tragedy meets the tragedy of our time in Roe's winning debut novel. Read full book review >
GOD HELP THE CHILD by Toni Morrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A chilling oracle and a lively storyteller, Nobel winner Morrison continues the work she began 45 years ago with The Bluest Eye."
Brutality, racism and lies are relieved by moments of connection in Morrison's latest. Read full book review >
ONE SEASON OF HOPE by Jim Stovall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A heartwarming story that's 'a little bit about football and an awful lot about life.'"
A novel about small-town high school football, life lessons, and President Harry S. Truman. Read full book review >

PLEASANTVILLE by Attica Locke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A thriller wrapped in an involving story of community and family dynamics. Locke serves up a panorama of nuanced characters and writes with intelligence and depth."
Race, politics and petty grievances muddy the quest for justice when a young election volunteer is kidnapped and murdered. Read full book review >
ONE NIGHT by Eric Jerome Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"Unflinching in its acceptance of bad behavior by likable characters, Dickey's latest will thrill his fans."
A chance encounter leads to one night of passion—and spiritual redemption—between strangers. Read full book review >
THE TURNER HOUSE by Angela Flournoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A talent to watch."
A complicated portrait of the modern American family emerges in Flournoy's debut novel. Read full book review >
THE THRILLING ADVENTURES OF LOVELACE AND BABBAGE by Sydney Padua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"A prodigious feat of historically based fantasy that engages on a number of levels."
An audaciously imagined alternate history of the invention of the computer—in 19th-century Victorian England. Read full book review >
CHALLENGER DEEP by Neal Shusterman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2015

"An adventure in perspective as well as plot, this unusual foray into schizophrenia should leave readers with a deeper understanding of the condition. (author's note) (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Fantasy becomes reality in an exploration of mental illness based partly on the experiences of the author's son, who is also the book's illustrator. Read full book review >
INHERITANCES by William Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 2015

"Black is at his best as a social realist in a blue-collar milieu; elsewhere, the strain shows."
It used to be Pennsylvania coal country, and even now that the mining jobs have gone, many in Black's first story collection find it hard to leave. Read full book review >
PARIS RED by Maureen Gibbon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 2015

"Fans of art history, Paris and contemporary Künstleroman like Girl With a Pearl Earring will enjoy the new perspective and the strong female voice."
Manet's muse ponders color, power, sex and love in vibrant 1860s Paris. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >