Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2620)

DARLING by William Tester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 1992

"Inauspicious."
Debut novelist Tester sings a thinly storied but encrustedly lyrical song here to the southern gothic: about two brothers, Jeab and Baby, and their shared past—in which what figured most largely was their mutual lust for their milk cow, Darling. Read full book review >
GOING TO PATCHOGUE by Thomas McGonigle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 1992

A swoony mash of here, there, and everywhere: place- reflections, middle-aged stock-taking, bad poetry, and a good deal of trivial lip-smacking over the satisfactions of nonlinear narrative. Read full book review >

TAR BEACH by Richard Elman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 2, 1992

"A sex-saturated novel that celebrates the bright things of a lost world: at once a moving story of fathers and sons, a soap opera, and a tour de force that is both brilliantly inventive and flawed in the way it insistently calls attention to its language instead of its people."
Elman's 19th book (Disco Frito, 1988, etc.)—a Joycean-like symphony of voices set in 1947 on a ``tar beach,'' or rooftop sunbathing area, in Jewish Brooklyn—wears thin before its finish, but it does for its milieu what Nelson Algren did for his: finally it becomes so idiosyncratic that its peculiar language seems almost invented. Read full book review >
A MODERN WAY TO DIE by Peter Wortsman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 2, 1992

A first collection, by a writer best known for his translation of Robert Musil's Posthumous Papers of a Living Author, that can be read in five-minute snatches: it consists of 70 short-shorts, fragments, prose poems, and ``microtales''—a hit-and-miss affair where minimalism meets the surreal, resulting in equal doses of lyricism and tabloid humor. Read full book review >
THE TANGO PLAYER by Christoph Hein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"A timely, disturbing vision of social and moral collapse."
A chilling depiction of the Kafkaesque dimensions of life in Eastern Europe from prominent German playwright and novelist Hein, echoing the harsh social analysis of his earlier novel, The Distant Lover (1989). Read full book review >

FLAGS OF CONVENIENCE by Bernard Packer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Philosophy, economics, history, social commentary—all are tucked in, pleasantly disguised as style."
Intelligence, cynicism, leadership, and a passion for an exceptionally healthy widow link opposing officers in a coup-ridden Latin American country. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Such ideas make sense to fill air time, but aren't particularly worth memorializing in a gimmicky book like this."
National Public Radio personality Stamberg, along with novelist Garrett, got the bright idea to have 23 writers—Richard Bausch, Ann Beattie, Madison Smartt Bell, Stuart Dybek, and a host of others—work independently of each other on a story that incorporates the title image. Read full book review >
NOT THE END OF THE WORLD by Rebecca Stowe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Nevertheless, the author's uncompromising, forceful style keeps the pages turning."
An angry young girl struggles to grow up in `60s suburbia—in this flawed but still intriguing tragicomic debut, first published in England, by a New York writer. Read full book review >
DAUGHTERS OF ALBION by A.N. Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Admirable in its own right, this always enjoyable comedy of manners gains in meaning and significance when read in sequence—a trilogy (so far) of Balzacian dimensions and Amis-like wit."
The third volume in Wilson's ``Lampitt Papers'' sequence is just as engaging and entertaining as the first two (Incline Our Hearts and A Bottle in the Smoke). Read full book review >
THE TESTIMONY OF DANIEL PAGELS by Vickery Turner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Don't try this at home, kids."
When his defense of Lawrence Pagels on a murder charge stalls, Edgar Stassen nervously mops his brow and shifts to the wildest legal argument you're ever likely to hear, in fiction or out. Read full book review >
IN A HIGH AND LONELY PLACE by Steven Voien
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Impacted into the Himalayas, you track the pug marks and dung of great cats while the wind thrills up your back."
Suspense first novel set in the Himalayas, by a member of the Economic Section of the American Embassy in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Read full book review >
THE RAG DOLL PLAGUES by Alejandro Morales
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Morales (The Brick People, Death of an Anglo—both 1988) offers a novel that exhibits the very qualities it celebrates: energy, hopefulness, a reverence for roots."
Swarms of butterflies and hummingbirds, a jaguar on a leash, a hero who's writing himself into existence, beneficent ghosts of ancestors—all the trappings of post-Borges magic realism are gathered in this undeniably derivative and yet often quite funny, quirky meditation on Mexican-American relations, the politics of epidemics and the uses of history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >