Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2620)

A VISIT HOME by Will Aitken
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1993

"Occasionally too much is telegraphed too soon, but Aitken's novel, articulate and impressive, handles a controversial issue engagingly while mostly staying away from therapeutic jargon or easy answers."
A careful, well-made chronicle of a man's attempt to dredge up childhood abuse and of his later confrontation with his father. Read full book review >
BATS OUT OF HELL by Barry Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1993

"A compelling concatenation, even if sometimes overwrought or marred by seemingly superficial weirdness."
Mississippi's literary powerhouse returns with another group of stories (Airships, 1978; the novels Boomerang, Never Die, etc.) in which the surreal social vision and subsurface savagery that have become Hannah's hallmarks are present in abundance. Read full book review >

ADRIFT ON THE NILE by Naguib Mahfouz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 1993

"Quietly, disturbingly incisive about modern Cairo's uneasy truce between old ways and new, though less powerfully compressed than either The Cairo Trilogy or last year's magical The Journey of Ibn Fattouma."
Ten young professionals spend their evenings drifting in a houseboat on the Nile until a senseless tragedy splits them apart—in a brief 1966 novel, the most clearly modernist work yet translated into English by the Nobel-winning author of The Cairo Trilogy. Read full book review >
GRASSLANDS by Jonathan Gillman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 1993

"A small auspicious triumph, from a writer whose ear is almost unerring and whose empathy seldom flags."
Twenty-three interrelated stories, set near the Missouri River in a small South Dakota town, tell the story of a lonely woman who has lost nearly everyone. Read full book review >
I'LL BE LEAVING YOU ALWAYS by Sandra Scoppettone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 1993

"The sensitivity to fashionable attitudes about gay couples, AIDS, recycling, and the New York homeless will satisfy even the strictest of the P.C. police."
Bad things happen to women who know lesbian p.i. Read full book review >

MONNEW by Ahmadou Kourouma
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 8, 1993

Ivory Coast-born Kourouma (The Suns of Independence, 1982) brilliantly indicts both colonial and independent Africa for their monnew—insults, outrages, humiliations. Read full book review >
VOICES OF SUMMER by Diane Pearson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 5, 1993

"Literary equivalent of down-home cooking—no surprises, just remarkably satisfying on its own terms."
An artless formulaic story from British author Pearson (The Summer of the Barshinskys, 1984, etc.)—all about love and light opera in the Austrian Alps. Read full book review >
US by Wayne Karlin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 1993

"Karlin layers the novel with mythological Vietnamese riffs, but most readers will be too weary—after battling superficial characterizations and one plot contrivance after another—to care much one way or the other."
Karlin's fourth novel (The Extras; Lost Armies, etc.), set in Thailand and Burma, is part MIA adventure, part opium-lord showdown. Read full book review >
FRUITING BODIES AND OTHER FUNGI by Brian Lumley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Nice stuff—but most necessary for the title story."
Witch's dozen of 13 horror tales by Lumley (Blood Brothers, p. 630), largely mainstream with just a touch of Lovecraft in the night. Read full book review >
THE SINGULARITY PROJECT by F.M. Busby
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Agreeably constructed and set forth—unfortunate, then, that the overall effect is uninvolving and as flat as yesterday's beer."
Hardcover debut for a veteran of the paperback shelves: a near-future light comedy-intrigue about the construction of an instantaneous transport device. Read full book review >
JAPANESE BY SPRING by Ishmael Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"There's not much novel here beyond the screed-element, but in his own inimitable way Reed is able to activate Zeitgeist-y opinions the way hardly anyone else does, or even tries to do."
Don't let the bucolic-sounding title mislead: this is Reed (The Terrible Threes, 1989, etc.) at his general level of pugnaciousness, exaggeration, cartoon, and troublemaking. Read full book review >
AMERICA BY LAND by Robert Olmstead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Very fine and real: a moving portrait of the heart's own sojourn."
Olmstead strikes out for parts unknown in his third novel: a road story that carries us deep into the American Southwest and far beyond the velleities of his previous work (A Trail of Heart's Blood Wherever We Go, 1990; Soft Water, 1988). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >