Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2631)

MONSTERS IN OUR MIDST by Robert Bloch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Better than you may expect but not memorable."
Companion to last year's Psycho-Paths horror anthology, edited as before by the renowned motherstuffer of Psycho. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF NIGHTS by Sylvie Germain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Sometimes short on inner energy, but, overall, a gloriously beautiful, gem-studded tapestry of human desire and suffering."
Germain's sixth book is her first to appear in English: a poetic saga that sweeps its way through a century of French history by following the generations of a symbol-rich family. Read full book review >

THE LAUGHTER OF HEROES by Jonathan Neale
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A writer to watch."
A first novel about a puppeteer, dying of AIDS, whose circle of ex-lovers and friends decide to take him to Disney World. Read full book review >
DAMASCUS NIGHTS by Rafik Schami
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"The magic of the various tales is undermined when the speakers revert to their ordinary selves—but the moments when the spell holds are binding indeed."
Damascus-born, Germany-based children's writer Schami delivers an occasionally charming but more often unmoving tale of Arabian nights and a determined effort to help a master yarnspinner regain his lost ability to speak. Read full book review >
LABOUR OF LOVE by Doug Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Wilson himself died in 1992, but he's left behind a tribute not only to his dead lover but to the human spirit."
Author Peter McGehee, who introduced AIDS-afflicted but zany Zero MacNoo in Boys Like Us (1991) and Sweetheart (1992), died after the latter novel; here, his lover and collaborator completes the trilogy with an account of Zero's death. Read full book review >

CHRISTMAS FOREVER by David G. Hartwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Roger Zelazny, Joan Aiken, Gene Wolfe, Charles de Lint, Rudy Rucker, Damon Knight, Alan Dean Foster, Robert Sheckley, Brian Stableford, Michael Bishop), skeptical browsers will be forgiven for regarding somewhat cynically askance a volume whose sole raison d'etre is to cash in on the festivities."
Expect neither old favorites nor unjustly neglected gems: these are 28 all-new tales with a Yuletide flavor, ranging from fairy tales to hard sf, assembled by one of the field's most highly regarded editors. Read full book review >
THE LATIN DELI by Judith Ortiz Cofer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"With the poetry accenting and enhancing themes revealed in the prose: a remarkably cohesive, moving collection—a tribute both to Cofer's considerable talent and her heritage."
A compassionate, delicate rendering of Puerto Rican life in America—told in poetry and 15 short stories—as Cofer continues to explore territory first described in her debut novel, The Line of The Sun (1989). Read full book review >
BEARS DISCOVER FIRE by Terry Bisson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"About half the entries here are amusing if ephemeral; for the remainder, Bisson's distinctive style and priceless imagination lift his work to an altogether more exalted plane."
Nineteen tales, one from 1964, the rest 1988-93: Bisson's first story collection since the illustrious Voyage to the Red Planet (1990), Talking Man, etc. Bisson's stock in trade is whimsy where, at his best, he combines a splendidly loopy inventiveness with real poignancy, a hard-edged sense of wonder and a grasp of the genuinely alien. Read full book review >
A BRIEF HISTORY OF MALE NUDES IN AMERICA by Dianne Nelson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Competent storytelling, but cumulatively morose."
A Flannery O'Connor Award debut collection of 15 stories— about half of which have appeared in small mags—that's well- written, straight-forward, and also a bit monotonous. Read full book review >
PEMBERLEY by Emma Tennant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Dyspeptic."
Tennant (The Half-Mother, 1985) enters this fall's ``Jane Wars'' in which sequels to Austen's Pride and Prejudice vie—and is bested by Julia Barrett with her deft and entertaining Presumption (p. 948). Read full book review >
PROUD MAN by Katharine Burdekin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 1993

"Vastly more readable than other Burdekin reissues, with frequently devastating—and remarkably skillful—feminist analyses. (Be prepared, however, to grit your teeth when the author comes unstuck; her discussion of homosexuality, for instance, is utterly misguided.)"
A first US edition of another reprinted novel (this originally published in 1934) by Burdekin (1896-1963), who also wrote as ``Murray Constantine'' (Swastika Night, 1985; The End of This Day's business, 1989). Read full book review >
GODMOTHER by Anthony Mancini
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 1993

"Mario Puzo and the Synoptic Gospels: it doesn't get any tackier than this."
The title is only half right: this sturdy distaff Godfather (Godfather II is actually a closer model) broadens out, in the sequel of the Godmother's son, to ape an even more venerable literary model. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >