Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2632)

THE VILLAGE OF BOM JESUS by Lloyd E. Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Innocuous if never quite diverting."
Bom Jesus is a cat, his village being Guajar†, deep in the Amazon basin of northwest Brazil. Read full book review >
THE SPOILS OF WAR by Alan Dean Foster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"A workmanlike job from Foster, with his usual well-drawn alien characters plus, on a deeper level, an interesting take on the choices facing America in the post-cold war world."
The third in the series (after A Call to Arms and The False Mirror) in which the freedom-loving alliance known as the Weave enlists the aid of the human race to win a centuries-long interstellar war. Read full book review >

OBABAKOAK by Bernardo Atxaga
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The work of an original voice and a considerable talent: a debut that's as delightful as it is disturbing, and full of surprises."
Distinctive, subtle storytelling in a wide-ranging yet curiously cohesive novel, awarded the Spanish National Prize for Literature, from Basque writer Atxaga. Read full book review >
NIGHTSIDE THE LONG SUN by Gene Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"The clever plotting, solid characters, and intriguing backdrop work splendidly in close- up, but their larger significance remains annoyingly unexplained, indeed barely even intimated."
The first installment in another multivolume, far-future saga (like Wolfe's The Book of the New Sun tetralogy, 1980-87), set inside...well, something—a supercolossal spaceship? a ringworld? a Dyson sphere?—that has its own sun, seasons, and a land surface that curves up in the distance to form the sky; until recently, this world's numerous ruling gods communicated with humans via ``Sacred Windows'' from their remote Mainframe home. Read full book review >
THE ESTUARY by Georgia Savage
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Overall, with its gritty translucence, a penetrating study of loss."
In a dark but briskly readable novel by an Australian writer (The House Tibet—not reviewed), a young widow examines her loves, friendships, and relationship with her child. Read full book review >

SWIMMING IN THE VOLCANO by Bob Shacochis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Shacochis's lumpy novel lacks the very qualities that make his stories so remarkable: grace and economy."
Accomplished short-story writer Shacochis (Easy in the Islands, The Next New World) weighs in with an ambitious first novel that (like Susan Sontag's recent tome) mixes sexual intrigue, political revolution, and volcanoes. Read full book review >
THE OTHER ANNA by Barbara Esstman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Full of good intentions—and not much else."
A young woman's rites of passage in Iowa before the Great War- -limned in a first novel of much craft and too little vitality. Read full book review >
A PORTRAIT OF MY DESIRE by MacDonald Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"A veteran novelist at the top of his form."
Harris puts on a southern Californian magic show in this bravura l6th novel (Glad Rags, 1991, etc.) about an art-gallery owner who takes the gamble of his life. Read full book review >
ANGELS AND INSECTS by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Dull and forced."
Two postmodern novellas with Victorian themes that have all the leaden scholarly pretension of that era—and none of the leavening irony that made Byatt's bestselling Possession (1990) so successful a mix of erudition and wit. Read full book review >
DIAMOND'S COMPASS by P.H. Liotta
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"An endnote acknowledges that this first novel life as a long poem, and it shows: Liotta's gestures toward melodrama have the effect of providing grist for, or even simply interrupting, the meditations on Iran as seen from a strenuously Western point of view."
A sensitive Air Force cadet arrives on a visit to his parents in Tehran on the eve of the Shah's fall, unaware of the tapestry of coming-of-age experiences that awaits him. Read full book review >
RUMORS FROM THE LOST WORLD by Alan Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Davis's sure touch with parents and children reflects his greatest strength—an acute sense of what keeps us all afloat in the sea of time."
Moving easily between blue-collar types and Social Register summer people, New Age dancers and Old World immigrants, underground poets and Elvis freaks, newcomer Davis (coeditor with Michael C. White, of the American Fiction series) demonstrates an impressive range in this debut collection of 12 stories. Read full book review >
ASK ME NO QUESTIONS by Patricia Veryan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"On automatic pilot—but an enjoyable, lighthearted romantic series."
Georgian romancer Veryan launches another handsome, nobly jumpy nob who finds a delightful (if considered unsuitable) love, and—with a little help from his friends who've appeared in Times Fool (1991) and Had We Never Loved (1992)—confounds the latest plot of the nefarious League of Jewelled Men. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >