Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2632)

MAD DOG by Jack Kelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Kelly occasionally succumbs to the temptations of poetry and elevated style, but for the most part he is bang-on in this poignant black-and-white sketch of inept crimes, modest criminals, and gray times."
While John Dillinger roams the Midwest robbing banks and breaking hearts, a minor flimflam man takes the Hoosier as his role model and finds professional success—in this melancholy criminal study by the author of Apalachin (1987) and Protection (1989). Read full book review >
TOM REBER'S LAST RETREAT by Oystein Lonn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"A tour de force recalling Death in Venice, The Fall, and the airless idylls of John Hawkes—though Reber's oxygen-starved sensibility may make readers feel stifled too."
Much-published Norwegian novelist Lnn's first English-language appearance shows fourth-generation shipping magnate Tom Reber watching his life fall apart (his family business has just gone bankrupt) as if through the wrong end of a telescope. Read full book review >

COURT OF SHADOWS by Cynthia Morgan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Mayhap for her next effort the author might rein in her estimable enthusiasm for arcane speech and put more bounce in the belles and boys."
A mammoth Elizabethan-era adventure/romance, set in 16th- century England, Spain, and France, in which a pleasantly diverting derring-do plot is clobbered by chunks of heavily researched authentica—artifacts, urban scenery, and, worst of all, forsooth, dialogue that, i'faith, must needs impede the pace, perforce, when slathered on overmuch. Read full book review >
THAT'S ALL, FOLKS! by Greg Snow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Better in concept than execution: Snow's first novel, already bought for the movies, reads as though calculated precisely to take advantage of post-Roger Rabbit special effects and may be more effective on the screen."
A comic debut that makes a transition directly from offensiveness to sentimentality: a vain, greedy, creature of 1980's London finds himself turning into a cartoon until—with the help of an angel—he recovers his humanity. Read full book review >
LOVE YOU TO DEATH by Grant Michaels
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"The nasty exchanges between Stan and Nikki, the tense confrontations between Branco and Stan, and the lovelorn asides from Stan to himself enliven a so-so story."
The second appearance of flighty Boston hairdresser Stan ``Vannos'' Kraychik finds him eyeing the waiter at the press opening of his client Liz Carlini's new venture, Le Jardin Chocolatier, while his friend Laurett, the shop's manager, serves special truffles to Liz; her wealthy, stuffy husband, Prestin Kingsley; and her creative cookery partner, Danny Doherty (who also has an eye for the waiter). Read full book review >

MR. MANI by A.B. Yehoshua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Still, an interesting, and certainly challenging, read."
A self-consciously experimental novel from Israeli writer Yehoshua (Five Seasons, A Late Divorce, etc.) in which a family's history is told backwards in one-sided conversations. Read full book review >
THE CHALCHIUHITE DRAGON by Kenneth Morris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"For all the unpronounceable Nahuatl names, this newfound book is a treat, a welcome change from the standard fantasy settings, with engaging characters, a wealth of wonders, and an inner wisdom as rare as it is profound."
Despite the unwieldy title, devotees of fantasy should be thrilled with this newly discovered novel (left unpublished at the time of Morris's death in 1939) by one of the founders of the genre. Read full book review >
FESTIVAL IN FIRE SEASON by Ellyn Bache
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"An overly schematic plot, plus an abrupt and disappointing climax, mars this otherwise captivating story—but Bache's ability to evoke a particular time and place is remarkable."
Love, rebellion, and tragedy collide in this tale of intertwining lives in a small North Carolina beach town called Festival—a carefully calculated story by the author of Safe Passage (1988) that never quite includes the reader in its passion. Read full book review >
KILLING COLOR by Charlotte Watson Sherman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"An intermittently satisfying poetic sampler that at moments really hums."
Eleven folk-tale-style stories rich in musical language from an African-American writer in Seattle, winner of a regional fiction award. Read full book review >
THIS IS NEXT YEAR by Philip Goldberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

Time was, the National League Dodgers team belonged to Brooklyn and Brooklyn belonged to ``the Bums.'' First-novelist Goldberg here takes a super-sentimental journey back to 1955, the last glory days of Ebbets Field, and builds a chummy family sitcom around game high points—and low. Read full book review >
THE FIRST WIVES CLUB by Olivia Goldsmith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Moreover, the novel mainlines into a vein of pure bile—which can't help but produce heady effects on those millions of women who know exactly what Goldsmith's talking about. (Film rights sold to Paramount.)"
``There ought to be some kind of retribution, some way to even the score....Let's make sure they pay a price.'' These are the words of a veritable Park Avenue Medea in Goldsmith's sharp, vitriolic, funny, and exceedingly commercial debut novel—all about what happens when three abandoned society wives get mad. Read full book review >
A GYPSY GOOD TIME by Gustav Hasford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1992

"Certainly not here, in this classically awful, unintentionally hilarious, hard-boiled rotten egg."
Dowdy Lewis, Jr., half owner of a Hollywood bookstore specializing in the Old West, is an alcoholic and self-pitying Vietnam vet, and has the misfortune to fall for a dish named Yvonna Lablaine, who works for a cheapo movie producer named Bird Cameron. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >