Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2633)

SMALL FAVORS by James Russell Mayes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Gentle, endearing, sometimes campy, appropriately crass, often wry, always funny."
Mayes's debut of interconnected short stories explores the common themes of love and sexuality with a fresh new sensitivity. Read full book review >
THE RENDEZVOUS by Patrick O'Brian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Eloquent and elegant as expected, these often intriguing tales are never quite as enthralling as one might hope."
His reputation as a novelist secure, O'Brian (The Wine-Dark Sea, 1993, etc.) here seeks to cement his reputation as a short-story writer. Read full book review >

LITTLE SISTERS OF THE APOCALYPSE by Kit Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Though it seems intended as a bonk-you-over-the-head novel of ideas, it ends simply as a touching tribute to the author's mother, a bittersweet space-age tale on the nature of women and loss."
From Reed (Thief of Lives, 1992, etc.) a story on two levels- -one far from real life, and one (we can only assume) directly connected to the author's heart. Read full book review >
SPLATTERPUNKS II by Paul M. Sammon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"This exercise in combining incongruous media elements into one discordant whole could be the real cutting edge—but Sammon dulls it in introductory passages whose smugness and hipster wannabe posturing frequently undermine the authors' contributions."
A mosaic of viscera, excrement, sex, and degradation whirls before our eyes in this anthology of stories and essays that run the gamut from lame and pretentious to genuinely stunning. Read full book review >
HOMEBODIES by Joan Schweighardt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Despite the clumsy narrative premise, Schweighardt looks at domestic problems with honesty and humor."
Putting a nosy neighbor in the position of narrating events she could neither witness nor learn about secondhand is the awkward device that launches this dark comedy about a troubled family, by the author of Island (1992). Read full book review >

WHAT I HAVE WRITTEN by John A. Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Even the eroticism grows tedious."
Scott (Blair, 1989) appears to have misplaced his sense of humor in this slight novel, which would more appropriately be titled Men and Women Who Think About Sex Too Much. Read full book review >
THE CLIFF by David R. Slavitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Witty and urbane, the book is sure to capture the minds, if not the hearts, of armchair travelers and those who enjoy dark humor with their literature."
Prolific author Slavitt (Turkish Delights, 1993, etc.) deals up a delightful satire that punctures academia with a sure and measured hand. Read full book review >
KNEELING ON RICE by Elizabeth Denton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Powerful imagery and subtle writing accompanied by incomplete characters and plots make for spare, evocative, but often frustrating stories."
This debut collection of stories involves an array of brash, complex women interacting with one another, their families, and their lovers in strange and novel ways. Read full book review >
DUPLICATIONS by Enrique Jaramillo Levi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Forgettable."
There are so many of these brief, unspectacular stories by the Panamanian Levi that eventually their very number overwhelms. Read full book review >
PEACE ON EARTH by Stanislaw Lem
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"His complex, witty narratives, while often — as here — lacking visceral clout, attack the outermost limits of logic and reason."
This third appearance for imperturbable astronaut Ijon Tichy (following The Futurological Congress, 1974) extends the horrifying notions on future weapons and warfare that Lem advanced in One Human Minute (1986). Read full book review >
THE KING IS DEAD by Paul M. Sammon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Though old curly lip remains an enticing phenomenon, too much bad writing leaves the reader all shook up and itchin like a man on a fuzzy tree."
A tribute to Dead Elvis that ranges from campy and fun to morbid and strange, from inventive and clever to weird and just plain dumb. Read full book review >
THOSE THAT MATTERED by Barbara Angle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A hard-edged tale of mining conditions and, especially, of the dearly bought success of one courageous woman."
This autobiographical debut novel about coal mining in Appalachia is almost hypnotic in its intensity, drama, and stark realism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >