Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2634)

DEMONS by Fyodor Dostoevsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 1994

"Volokhonsky and Pevear's translation brings to the surface all of Dostoevsky's subtle linguistic and nationalist humor, and the copious notes are indispensable for making one's way through the thicket of 19th-century Russian politics."
Dostoevsky's sprawling political novel is given new life in this fresh translation. Read full book review >
A COMEDY OF MURDERS by George Herman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1994

"Herman successfully sets the historical stage, but the mystery sadly is drowned in the details."
Herman (Carnival of Saints, 1994) returns to Renaissance Italy for a bout with murder and mystery in the court of Il Moro, Duke of Milan. Read full book review >

THE STEPSON by Emmanuel Bove
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1994

"The bare prose creates an ironic distance with which Bove is occasionally able to prove that even a minimalist can display a sense of humor, albeit a cool one."
Bove (Quicksand, 1991) employs skeletal language with surgical detachment to dissect the agony of social climbing. Read full book review >
MURDER OFFSCREEN by Denise Osborne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 14, 1994

"Even if you don't cotton to Queenie Davilov, you're bound to be impressed."
If you think the contents of the lunch box independent filmmaker Burke Lymon's just received—pieces of a dead squirrel nailed to a wooden cross, accompanied by a miniature ax and a note from ``your most adooring fan, Lucifer''—sound revolting, just wait till you see what somebody does to Lymon himself at the premiere of his latest, Lucifer's Shadow. Read full book review >
A MARRIAGE MADE AT WOODSTOCK by Cathie Pelletier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1994

"Yuppie angst rendered hilarious and human by the effervescent wit of rising star Pelletier. (Author tour)"
Frederick Stone, Woodstock hippie turned oblivious accountant, may have sold his marriage up the river when he sold out to yuppie greed in this exuberant latest from Pelletier (The Bubble Reputation, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

HIDDEN RICHES by Nora Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1994

"The refreshingly contemporary style of their courtship, romance sparked with funny dialogue, makes this book a good choice for light summer reading."
Roberts (Private Scandals, 1993) keeps us sensuously engrossed in a suspenseful romance that moves smoothly between the harsh world of high-stakes crime and the zaniness of theater, antiques, and bric-a-brac. Read full book review >
THE UNICORN HUNT by Dorothy Dunnett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1994

"Another rousing, utterly convincing adventure — and still, after more than 3,000 pages on Niccolo's life, readers are bound to ask for more."
This fifth installment in the entertaining saga of 15th-century merchant Nicholas van der Poele (Scales of Gold, 1992, etc.) takes the 29-year-old bank owner to Scotland, the Tyrol, Italy, and Egypt in passionate pursuit of his errant wife and her infant son. Read full book review >
LOUISIANA POWER AND LIGHT by John Dufresne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1994

"But despite a few experimental passages, the writing here is fairly conventional and conventionally boring."
In his first novel, Dufresne extends the exploits of the Fontana family, introduced in his highly touted collection of stories, The Way That Water Enters Stone (1991). Read full book review >
MIDNIGHT IS A LONELY PLACE by Barbara Erskine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1994

"Erskine clearly has some talent; with a little more thought—and more historical research—she could do something wonderful."
Initially gripping, Erskine's follow-up to her successful Lady of Hay (1987) ultimately reads like a bad TV movie. Read full book review >
SAY UNCLE by Eric Shaw Quinn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 1994

"Ask any psychoanalyst—a classic case of denial."
A schizophrenic debut with a suspenseless first half about a gay man fighting for the guardianship of his orphaned nephew and a tedious second half about their life together that offhandedly dismisses the issue of sexuality. Read full book review >
SANDSPIT CROSSING by Noel Virtue
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1994

The black is there, but the comedy comes and goes in this novel about quirky Sandspit Crossing—a sort of dusty, down-under Winesburg, New Zealand—by the author of Then Upon the Evil Season (not reviewed). Read full book review >
THE GARDENER by Seamus Dunne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1994

"The story's development is predictable and the author cuts off the action at the climax, but there is much finely observed social commentary, even if it is buried in a somewhat obvious morality tale."
An intriguing first novel by Dunne, an Irish journalist, that plays off a familiar ploy about Holocaust guilt in an unusual setting. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >