Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2643)

MURDER IN THE PLACE OF ANUBIS by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"First of a promised, and promising, series."
A Tutankhamen-era mystery loosely inspired by Agatha Christie's Death Comes as the End (now, incredibly, celebrating its 50th birthday) starts with the discovery of an extra body in the embalming shelter. Read full book review >
SPECIAL VICTIMS by Nick Gaitano
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"He killed for the art of it'') seems to come out of a different world, redolent of lending libraries and preadolescent fantasies."
An intense, undernourished psychodrama about a Chicago cop on the trail of the Collector, a contract killer of unwilling organ-donors. Read full book review >

NEW WORLDS 3 by David Garnett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Technically proficient, unobtrusively Anglophone, and different enough to be worthy of investigation by original- anthology enthusiasts."
In the 1960's, under the editorship of Michael Moorcock (he contributes an afterword here), the British sf magazine New Worlds was generally regarded as having sparked the revolution that became known as the New Wave; this relic is an annually published anthology of original material, comprising nine stories plus critic John Clute's witty, slashing, sometimes rather feline roundup of 1991's sf novels. Read full book review >
THE ABSENCE OF ANGELS by W.S. Penn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A tender, compelling coming-of-age saga, with youthful alienation and family pride represented in a delicate, often uproarious combination."
A Bildungsroman filtered through Native American sensibilities serves as Penn's first novel as he follows his young hero from Hopiland to L.A.—all on a search for love, self, and understanding, complicated by a fragmented family beset by tragedy. Read full book review >
THE EMPIRE OF ICE by Richard Moran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Stock characters and clunkily-handled science put a freeze on suspense and excitement here: a derivative end-of-worlder."
An active volcano emerges from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, threatening to plunge the British Isles into a new Ice Age: a plot- heavy disaster thriller from Moran (Cold Sea Rising, 1986; Dallas Down, 1988). Read full book review >

MOTHERTIME by Gillian White
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Blessed with the gift of fashioning clever metaphors while delivering pungent pronouncements on men, marriage, and motherhood, White is best when she resists trying to make nice to her characters and sticks to skewering them."
From British journalist White, a wacky, well-written comic novel in which a narcissistic mother is imprisoned in her posh London home by her five young children. Read full book review >
COMPULSION by Michael Stewart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Damage."
Wasting no time in preliminaries, Stewart (Belladonna, 1992, etc.) opens with mutilated model Cristina Parigi's frantic, fatal, very public plunge into the East River and then, within a few pages, shows her employer already erotically re-creating herself as Cristina. Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN IN THE WOODS by Frederick Busch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"This fondness for their foibles deteriorates, out of habit, into teddy-bear fables about pain."
Unlike novelists who use the short-story as a sketchpad for longer works, or as a completely different formal challenge, Busch tends to freeze-dry his novels into stories' smaller spaces, keeping the same domestic point of view and eschewing too-sharp drama. Read full book review >
PRAYING FOR SLEEP by Jeffery Deaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Overlong, overheated, wildly uneven, but undeniably throat- clutching: Halloween for grownups. (First printing of 50,000)"
Deaver (The Lesson of Her Death, 1993, etc.) hurtles through the 12 hours following the escape of enormous, schizophrenic Michael Hrubek as he makes his way from Marsden State Hospital to the home of Lisbonne Atcheson—the woman who testified against him at his murder trial. Read full book review >
GRAND PASSION by Jayne Ann Krentz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"High sugar, low fiber."
Thin romantic suspense larded with soft-core porn—in a first hardcover from veteran Krentz (aka Amanda Quick). Read full book review >
VARIOUS ANTIDOTES by Joanna Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Sensitively nuanced insights into the more macabre manifestations of human behavior, by a writer of admirable originality."
A first collection from Scott (Arrogance, 1990, etc.) explores, in luminous prose, the obdurate nature of obsession in real and imaginary characters. Read full book review >
THE WOMAN BETWEEN THE WORLDS by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Hard-working, evocative, and suitably macabre—but with the rather thin plot and largely superfluous literary luminaries, not altogether convincing."
Overstuffed, waggish, literary-figured Victorian fantasy on the ``Invisible Man'' theme: MacIntyre's eccentric, stimulating debut. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >