Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2643)

I MARRIED VIETNAM by Sandie Frazier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"A promising and unusual debut."
Tale of a Vietnam vet from the point of view of his long-suffering wife, in an apparently autobiographical first novel from a Chicago writer. Read full book review >
TRIBAL SECRETS by Eugene Izzi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Izzi's poignancies and many sharp vignettes of the criminal life are overwhelmed by his contrived plot and his self-absorbed hero: Here's a thriller that aims to tackle important issues but winds up, despite moments of real power, being mostly self- important."
Where Izzi's Prowlers (1991) was operatic in its emotional intensity, his newest crime thriller is more soap operatic—a relentlessly grim farce about mobsters, madmen, and the family ties that bind. Read full book review >

THE LAST SPY by John Griffiths
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Griffiths may have overdrawn the villains, but his young lovers and hopelessly brash Ukrainians are immensely attractive."
Soviet neo-Stalinists and a couple of highly placed Americans have one last go at preserving the cold war before democracy ruins everything—in another smart thriller by the author of The Good Spy (1990), etc. Henry Kissinger won't like this one. Read full book review >
WHEN THE FIVE MOONS RISE by Jack Vance
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Dazzling inventiveness, barbed wit, the renowned prose style combining spareness of detail with extraordinary visual richness: that Vance does not top popularity polls and win critical acclaim is the most intractable and perplexing of all science-fiction mysteries."
Twelve tales, most from the early/mid 1950's, previously uncollected in hardback, though all but two have appeared in paperback collections. Read full book review >
SHAMAN by Noah Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"The story moves too fast to develop either characters or scenes deeply, but it's a good read and has a refreshing approach to the frontier as part of a larger culture, not an isolated place where people did nothing but murder each other."
Gordon (The Physician, The Jerusalem Diamond, etc.) offers two fictionalized generations of doctoring on the Illinois frontier from 1839 to 1865, covering such medical history as the advent of hygiene and anesthesia. Read full book review >

CONVOY HOMEWARD by Philip McCutchan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"As always, McCutchan runs a tight ship."
The immensely prolific and thoroughly reliable McCutchan continues his WW II convoy saga with a sixth adventure for Commodore Kemp (Convoy of Fear, etc.). Read full book review >
THE LONG-LEGGED FLY by James Sallis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Likely target audience: people who think James Lee Burke's moody Dave Robicheaux novels are overplotted."
Black detective Lew Griffin skips his father's final illness (New Orleans, 1964) when he's hired to find a missing person—well-known black leader Corene Davis. Read full book review >
TILL THE FAT LADY SINGS by Alisa Kwitney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 1992

"By this charming novel's end, ambivalent, abusive, and irresponsible men see the light—and these thoroughly contemporary characters pair off in the most old-fashioned way."
Warm, witty first novel of romance among the unromantic at Columbia University; the humor and benignly distant narrative tone are the reassuring tip-off that we're not talking realism here: The angst-ridden, drug-using, emotionally traumatized characters will grow up without coming to real harm. Read full book review >
BACKFIRE by Eric Sauter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"More, please."
Psycho punk kidnaps politico's runaway daughter: a second case for Philadelphia cop Patrick Paige (Skeletons, 1990). Read full book review >
TANGLED VINES by Janet Dailey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Easy going for Dailey fans. (Literary Guild Triple Selection for October)"
This time out, Dailey (Aspen Gold, etc.)—sets her dynasty- feudin' romance in the wine-growing country of California. Read full book review >
THE LORD'S MOTEL by Gail Donohue Storey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Isn't my life nifty?"
Storey's debut is The Mary Tyler Moore Show updated, set in a funky apartment house in the Montrose section of Houston. Read full book review >
THE JOURNEY OF IBN FATTOUMA by Naguib Mahfouz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Still, an ideal introduction to Mahfouz for readers put off by the Cairo Trilogy's expansive length."
Nobelist Mahfouz offers here a slender, magical parable of idealism and compromise through a stylized Middle East odyssey, first published in Arabic in 1983. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >