Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2643)

THE RELIC by Evelyn Anthony
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 1991

"Indeed, this is a decidedly poor man's le CarrÇ, though not so poor that it won't amuse in its lightweight way."
The author of 3l romantic suspense and espionage novels (featuring the British Mata Hari, Davina Graham) here labors to answer the question: What's a cold war spy-story writer to do now that perestroika's come? Read full book review >
WHO P-P-P-PLUGGED ROGER RABBIT? by Gary K. Wolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1991

"The perfect bookstore browse, though most readers will have had their fill before reaching the register."
Wolf's sequel to Who Censured Roger Rabbit?, the basis for the wildly successful film, presents private eye Eddie Valiant with some conflicting jobs: Roger Rabbit wants him to find out whether Clark Gable's beaten him out for the lead in Gone With the Wind—as well as out of wife Jessica's affections; David Selznick wants him to investigate the theft of a mysterious box from his office (the suspects are the three actors auditioning for Rhett Butler: Gable, Baby Herman, and Roger); Gable wants Eddie to find out who's been planting tabloid stories that say he's gay; and the murder of shadowy toon Kirk Enigman with Eddie's own gun sparks a search for the secret formula for Toon Tonic, which turns people into animated Toons (and vice versa). Read full book review >

IN THE SHADOW OF THE OAK KING by Courtway Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 6, 1991

"Arthurian legends go down for the count."
In this first novel in a projected trilogy based on the King Arthur legends, Jones, like Jean Auel, links some anthropological guess-and-by-gollys to an adventure tale—except that Jones's stories were created centuries ago out of whole (but golden) cloth. Read full book review >
ALL BACKS WERE TURNED by Marek Hlasko
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 1991

"Nihilistic but compelling."
A somber but accomplished novel of pervasive brutality and violence, in a place as hopeless and hellish as Devil's Island, from the late Polish Beat-writer and dissident Hlasko (Killing the Second Dog, 1990). Read full book review >
BOY'S LIFE by Robert R. McCammon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 1991

"Literary Guild Dual Selection for September)."
Midway through this enthralling ``fictography,'' as McCammon calls it, the young hero learns of a book ``about [a] town and the people in it...maybe there wasn't a real plot to it...but the book was about life...[it] was sweet and deep and left you wishing for more.'' That's a perfect description of McCammon's fictional autobiography as well, an exuberant celebration of childhood mystery and marvel that's a giant step apart from his popular horror/suspense novels (Mine, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >

GRAVITY'S ANGELS by Michael Swanwick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 1991

"And though nothing here approaches the splendor of his recent novel Stations of the Tide (1990), it's an impressive collection nonetheless."
Thirteen tangy tales, comprising the talented Swanwick's entire short-story output, ranging from logical fantasy to hard science fiction. Read full book review >
IN THE MATTER OF BILLY K. by David A. Tate
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 1991

"Maybe credible enough for a TV docudrama, but not for compelling fiction."
It could be that Tate, the author of Health, Hope, and Healing (1989), has had a change of heart since writing that nonfiction chronicle of his own return from cancer using such approaches as psychic healing and Silva Mind Control. Read full book review >
THE INVITATION by Claude Simon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 1991

"Close reading, but worth it."
A subtle and disturbing evocation of post-glasnost Russia by Nobel-winner and nouveau romancier Simon. Read full book review >
INHERIT THE MOB by Zev Chafets
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

Hilarious first novel and sendup of the Mafia, by the author of Devil's Night (1990), Members of the Tribe (1988), etc. Foreign correspondent and two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner William Gordon (real name ``Velvel'' Grossman to his Jewish family) comes home for a respite as a columnist on the Tribune, pursues his bisexual but largely lesbian movie-star girlfriend Jupiter Evans, and finds himself the main inheritor of his late uncle Max, a Jewish mobster whose ties to the Mafia go back 50 years. Read full book review >
A HOUSE OF SECRETS by Patti Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Should sell millions."
The former President's younger daughter follows up her bestselling Homefront and Deadfall and Kitty Kelley's Nancy Reagan with a moody, relentlessly introspective story about a moody, relentlessly introspective California girl whose career as a Serious Writer is haunted by memories of life with a brittle, humorless, ambitious, control freak of a mother and a pleasant, vague, rich, and possibly corrupt father. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Eclectic, well crafted, with authentic thrills and chills: a solid addition to the series."
Another huge, 51-piece compilation of 44 stories, an essay, and six poems, ranging in tone from light humor through splatterpunk to dark horror. Read full book review >
TO THE FRIEND WHO DID NOT SAVE MY LIFE by Hervé Guibert
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A relentlessly honest, extraordinarily truthful book."
An AIDS victim's impassioned refusal to go gently into that good night is the theme of this moving and often searing novel by French writer and journalist Guibert. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >