Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2669)

THE REST OF LIFE by Mary Gordon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"In their rarefied atmosphere, her lovers' passion is a pale fire and, finally, unconvincing."
Convoluted meditations by women on love and displacement—in Gordon's first fiction since The Other Side (1989). Read full book review >
OUT OF BODY AND MIND by Veronica Jean
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Eve, Adam, and the tempting red apple are only a few of the in-your-face conceits in this heavy-handed fantasy."
A mentally deranged young woman explains how she came to commit murder—in this very fey first novel from a small-press veteran. Read full book review >

THE RISING STORM by Suzanne Goodwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A slow but satisfying read for Anglophiles."
The author of several stolid but agreeable historical romances (A Change of Season, 1992, etc.) gets more mileage out of a new plot twist, framing a WW II romance—set in England and France— with a contemporary one. Read full book review >
SILENT PASSENGERS by Larry Woiwode
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A mixed bag—and rather downbeat."
Ten stories treating instances of heightened memory and perception by men, usually fathers, as ordinary life goes on around them in the North Dakota, Montana, and northern plains, by masterful but inconsistent Woiwode (Indian Affairs, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
LENIN'S BRAIN by Tilman Spengler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"If not always limpid in the reading, a brilliantly tapestried and deadpan look at a half-century possibly as hilarious as it was mad."
The questionable medical practice of German neurologist Dr. Oskar Vogt extends from the 1890's to WW II—and by chronicling those decades in his knowledgeable, droll, and spirited first novel, Spengler offers an entertainment following Europe's history from last century's end to the moment before Nazi defeat. Read full book review >

MINUS TIME by Catherine Bush
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A slightly surreal collage of often remarkable images and sensitively drawn characters that doesn't quite cohere—but that Bush is a talent to watch is without doubt."
Patchy yet captivating first novel about familial fractures- -with an unusual conceit. Read full book review >
CLEOPATRA GOLD by William J. Caunitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"But Caunitz's novel view that druglords are only the triggermen for the Man's interdepartmental squabbles could sell big copies. (First printing of 75,000)"
Another sprawling report from the NYPD, this one tracing the cross-plotted attempts of two divisions to infiltrate a world-class heroin gang. Read full book review >
SIGN LANGUAGES by James Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Hannah's plots are uneven, but his ear for mood and tone is nearly unerring—and the collection, for that reason, has a cumulative power that the individual stories don't have on their own."
An eclectic, bittersweet group of nine stories—Hannah's second book of fiction (Desperate Measures, 1988—not reviewed)- -mostly concerning lonesome men in exile who struggle desperately for human connection or who write off humankind. Read full book review >
A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT by Sebastien Japrisot
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"As tricky as Japrisot's earlier bestsellers in his native France (The Passion of Women, 1990, etc.)—but also precisely, surprisingly evocative of the lingering pain of mourning and the burdens of survival."
Dissatisfied with the official account of her fiancÇ Jean Etchevery's death in WW I, wheelchair-bound painter Mathilde Donnay resolves to find out the truth—with unexpectedly moving results at the end of a twisted trail. Read full book review >
A DANGEROUS ENCOUNTER by Ernst Jünger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Delicately mannered and full of nuance, this is certainly subtle—but a side effect of its careful, quiet understatement is that is seems over before it's really begun."
An innocent young German receives a rude awakening at the hands of world-weary decadents in fin de siäcle Paris—in a polished tale from the prolific JÅnger, a 97-year-old author who's acclaimed in Europe but little known here. Read full book review >
PSYCHE by Peter Michalos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

Michaelos's first novel is the story—told through letters and diary entries—of Freud's treatment of his first hysteria patient- -here known as Lucy O. The young and just-married Freud (it's 1886) believes that Lucy suffers from childhood seduction by her imperious and unpleasant father; but in the treatment (through hypnosis) that he embarks upon, the ambitious young doctor has an even deeper quarry: he suspects that the repressed forces of prehistoric myth themselves are surfacing to produce the attractive young girl's hysteria. ``The patient is, in fact,'' writes Freud, ``greatly discontented with being a girl,'' and, under hypnosis, Lucy recites long passages of a poem about fleet-footed Atalanta, the mythic girl who, alone among male hunters, took part in the slaying of the Calydonian Boar. Read full book review >
THE COURTYARD OF DREAMS by Anna Monardo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"An alluring tribute to love—of first love, of family, of Italy."
A first novel of great charm that attempts to penetrate the unique genius of the Italian family, both in Italy and in its American version. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >