Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2669)

SHARES by Richard Stern
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"But just about every hue of human anxiety uncommonly finds its own small pattern there, too, and the total effect seems more than the sum of its parts."
Parental advice, its instability and hysterical echoes, figures as a theme in a lot of Stern's fiction (Other Men's Daughters, A Father's Words, etc.)—which in its omnivorous, swarming, compressed, choppy, buzzing stylistics sometimes seems itself like a species of advice trying to camouflage itself as reality. Read full book review >
CRY OF THE HAWK by Terry C. Johnston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"In his fast-paced but uneven latest, Johnston (Carry the Wind, 1982, etc.) magnifies the violence and stench of the Old West."
Western potboiler that will stain the reader with grease, blood, and smoke. Read full book review >

PLAN B FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS by Ron Carlson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"Bland stuff."
Carlson (The News of the World, 1987; Truants, 1981; Betrayed by F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1977) writes stories in High Workshop Style: odd frameworks, scant forward motion, pearled with mundane perceptions of gladness and gloom that all come across as post- adolescent: ``I love to fly,'' the narrator of the title story confides—``I always sit in the window and press the corner of my forehead against the plastic glass. Read full book review >
DESTRUCTION AT NOONDAY by Bill Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"An old-fashioned story of modest heroics told in an old- fashioned Nevil Shute style that suits it perfectly."
A Canadian ocean liner becomes an island of safety during the earthquake that destroyed Yokohama in 1923. Read full book review >
CROSSED WIRES by John E. Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 1992

"Routine stuff, then, with perhaps some appeal for modem mavens."
First-novelist Simpson's come up with a nifty premise for a detective story: A hearing-impaired government researcher known simply as Finley, who feels comfortable and secure only with the friends she talks to via her computer keyboard, investigates a series of throat- slashings by finding out which bulletin boards the victims had logged onto. Read full book review >

NIGHT BUTTERFLY by Patricia McFall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"The fanciful plot strains belief, but McFall renders Japanese customs, manners, mores, etc., with much charm."
A first mystery in which Japanese gangsters, the CIA, and an American linguistics student, who's earning her fare home as a hostess at the Club Chocho, lead each other a lively chase—a chase that moves from Tokyo to Kyoto and back again. Read full book review >
FALSE PROFITS by David Everson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"Lumpen prose but an interesting premise—Lincoln's culpability—and although the Church of the Latter-day Saints has been rendered better (the Moroni Traveller series), this is a step up from Everson's last outing."
Bobby Miles, low-tech Springfield, Illinois, p.i. Read full book review >
FLIGHT by Fran Dorf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 13, 1992

"Overlong and overladen with flashbacks to the Sixties, but powerfully imagined throughout—a mostly successful stretch from the author of A Reasonable Madness (1990)."
Twenty years after a plunge from an upstate cliff near Woodstock, 40-ish Lana Paluka emerges from a catatonic state to deny that Ethan Skitt—the sullen boyfriend convicted of attempted murder—could have wanted to push her. Read full book review >
MEETING IN INFINITY by John Kessel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1992

"Of course the converse is true, too."
Fourteen speculative stories, 1981-92, from the author of Good News from Outer Space, (1989), with the emphasis on allegory and unlikely juxtapositions rather than ideas or invention. Read full book review >
WINDOVER by Jane Aiken Hodge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1992

"Plus a bonus—a trip through some English canals."
Another of Hodge's restless female heroines (Polonaise, Secret Island, etc.) is, again, nearly extinguished by the dismal and deadly double-standard of England's late-18th century. Read full book review >
THE SECRET SUN by Fred Hiatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 8, 1992

"An impressive debut from a writer who can paint the Japanese as a threat without obscuring his own critical affection for the people and their culture."
This debut novel by a former Washington Post Tokyo bureau chief offers an engaging hero, an unlikely but at least possible scenario, and manages to play upon American fears about increasing Japanese economic domination without engaging in some of the gratuitous Japan-bashing that's become so popular. Read full book review >
DRAGONFLY IN AMBER by Diana Gabaldon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 1992

"A most entertaining mix of history and fantasy whose author, like its heroine, exhibits a winning combination of vivid imagination and good common sense."
An engaging time-travel romance, the second of a trilogy (after Outlander, 1991), that animates the people and politics of a pivotal period in history—while turning up the heat between an appealing modern heroine and a magnetic romantic hero. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >