Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 2690)

69 by Ryu Murakami
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"It never gets the pulse pounding, but it's diverting—with a refreshingly intelligent and unstereotypical heroine."
Reminiscent of A.S. Byatt's Possession, though less lofty, Michaels's latest (Vanish With the Rose, etc.) sets a feminist literary scholar chasing after the origins of an 18th-century manuscript on a Virginia estate—and finding unexpected romance along the way. Read full book review >
HARVESTING THE HEART by Jodi Picoult
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Some good writing, but not enough to sustain a concept-driven and rather old-fashioned story, despite its occasional contemporary gloss."
An updated formulaic second novel (after Songs of the Humpback Whale, 1992) in which the young heroine not only finds herself but along the way comes to terms with that other contemporary women's issue: motherhood. Read full book review >

SEX WITH STRANGERS by Geoffrey Rees
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A pity—the play-by-play might have helped to cut through the solipsistic fog."
An egregiously overwritten, underplotted, self-absorbed first novel about a young gay man's search for sex, friendship, and love. Read full book review >
KICKING by Leslie Dick
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

Dick's second novel (after Without Falling, 1988—not reviewed) begins with a clever nouvelle roman flourish but soon finds its own level as a pretentious, stilted melodrama set in the so-called art worlds of London and New York in the Eighties. Read full book review >
PEOPLE OF THE SEA by W. Michael Gear
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"It's all without the character-centered pep of Mary Mackey's The Year the Horses Came (p. 959), but the scholarly base gives a sheen of credulity to the time and place and predicaments."
From the authors of People of the River (1992) and other novels (in paperback) set in America's prehistory: a rather rousing tale of deadly pursuits and spiritual journeys that is, in general, free of the dusty earnestness that so often clogs the movement of other fictional efforts by conscientious anthropologists like the Gears. Read full book review >

BUTCHER BIRD by Dean Ing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Credible and entertaining, especially for fans of the previous books, and a definite improvement over The Big Lifters (1988)."
High-tech thriller—sequel to the paperbacks The Ransom of Black Stealth One and The Nemesis Mission—featuring deadly, whisper-quiet, virtually undetectable UFO-like Stealth aircraft. Read full book review >
MORE THAN ALLIES by Sandra Scofield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Some beautifully carved pieces that never quite fit together to complete the puzzle."
The glue of female friendship—sticky in unexpected ways—is the focus of this fourth novel by Scofield (Walking Dunes, 1992, etc.), who has written with skill in the past about stark western settings and the even starker emotional lives of her youngish characters. Read full book review >
A GOOD DAY TO DIE by Stephen Solomita
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Brisk, manly fare whose leather-hearted hero deserves an encore—as does the still venerable Moodrow."
A sinewy thriller that's no doubt a kickoff—a steel-toed one- -to a new NYPD series by Solomita, whose Stanley Moodrow novels (A Piece of the Action, 1992, etc.) have lost a little edge. Read full book review >
OUR SECRET'S OUT by Darrell Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Spencer's a talented writer who can snap his fingers and go, but here there are too many forced epiphanies—as though stories try to claim territory that's been looked at and passed over but not explored."
Spencer (A Woman Packing a Pistol, 1987—not reviewed) cops a high-flying attitude in the 12 stories collected here—all about various odd ducks or blue-collar types, most of whom live in Las Vegas, Utah, and Nevada. Read full book review >
THE MISERABLES by Damien Wilkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Wilkins's novel is all interior, no edge, and the interior is a dull one."
The death of his grandfather spurs a young editor to reevaluate his life—in this brooding, introspective first novel from New Zealander Wilkins. Read full book review >
THE WINE-DARK SEA by Patrick O'Brian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"The illustrated guide to sails and masts is worth the price by itself."
Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin—the amiable, music-loving heroes of O'Brian's wonderful sail-powered series (The Truelove, The Letter of Marque, The Far Side of the World, et al.)—follow orders into the midst of revolutionary South American politics. Read full book review >
THE INNKEEPER'S SONG by Peter S. Beagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"And the result, if often admirable, is detached and cold, the opposite of what was evidently intended."
Rather uncharacteristic dark fantasy from the stylish author of The Folk of the Air (1986), The Last Unicorn, etc. Ill-tempered innkeeper Karsh reluctantly accepts a disparate set of guests: Lal, a black-skinned sorceress; her companion Nyateneri, a warrior- priestess fleeing assassins; and poor, pale, drowned Lukassa, resurrected by Lal, who recalls little of her past but can see into the netherworld. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >