Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 5)

THE LAST NIGHT AT TREMORE BEACH by Mikel Santiago
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A sadly squandered setting and a protagonist who's more abrasive than empathetic make for a lackluster story of things, real or imaginary, that go bump in the night."
A struggling composer tries to get away from it all at a remote Irish beach house, but a chance weather event seems to imbue him with special powers that give him disturbing views of future events. Read full book review >
AMONG THE RUINS by Ausma Zehanat Khan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A lyrically written look into a country many think of as war-torn and bleak reveals many sides to the place and its people."
A Muslim Canadian detective's instinct for trouble follows him to Iran. Read full book review >

WHERE THE LOST GIRLS GO by R.J.  Noonan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Ham-fisted—in both the pointedly ethnic characterizations and the clearly obvious identity of the murderer—and eminently forgettable."
Officer Laura Mori's first case uncovers something sinister lurking in the bucolic woods of Oregon. Read full book review >
A DIVIDED SPY by Charles Cumming
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"The prolific Cumming insufficiently preps the reader on the hero's back story but writes with ruefully brittle intelligence and keeps the twists coming."
A British agent lures a closeted Russian superspy into the open by befriending his spurned secret lover. Read full book review >
AUGUST SNOW by Stephen Mack  Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This mostly terrific debut holds out the promise that we are at the beginning of an excellent new series."
An ex-cop comes home to Detroit and finds himself embroiled in the investigation of a local business magnate's death. Read full book review >

THE SHIMMERING ROAD by Hester Young
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A road novel with too many detours."
In the second of a projected trilogy, Young's clairvoyant protagonist investigates the murders of her mother and half sister. Read full book review >
THE UNDESIRED by Yrsa Sigurdardóttir
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Rest assured that the guilty and the innocent alike will share every punishment Sigurdardóttir can dish out."
As in The Silence of the Sea (2016), Iceland's Queen of Crime juggles two sets of crimes in two time frames to produce a slow-burning, bone-chilling tale. Read full book review >
GILDED CAGE  by Vic James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An absorbing first installment that presages an intriguing new fantasy series."
In a debut novel, James introduces readers to an alternate modern-day England where enticing drama and social unrest mix with aristocratic scandal and glamorous magic. Read full book review >
ALL THAT'S LEFT TO TELL by Daniel Lowe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A story about storytelling, stirring and effective."
The haunting tale of a severed bond between father and daughter. Read full book review >
THE YOUNG WIVES CLUB by Julie Pennell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A light novel in which women take charge of their own happily-ever-afters."
Marrying young seems romantic to four young Louisiana friends, but their Prince Charmings turn out to have clay feet. Read full book review >
JOURNEYMAN by Marc Bojanowski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Bojanowski's novel is layered and thoughtful but aspires to heights it doesn't quite reach."
A rootless carpenter searches for home in Bojanowksi's second novel (The Dog Fighter, 2004). Read full book review >
THE YEAR OF THE COMET by Sergei Lebedev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This gorgeously written, unsettling novel—a rare work about the fall of the Soviet Union as told through the eyes of a child—leaves us with a fresh understanding of that towering moment in recent history."
Lebedev follows up Oblivion (2016), his powerful novel about the atrocities of the gulag, with this autobiographical tale of a boy's coming-of-age during the years leading to the fall of the Soviet Union. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >