Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 6)

THE BULLET by Mary Louise Kelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"Brilliant, beautiful Caroline's astonishingly bad decisions, coupled with her over-the-top reactions as events play out, make her a less-than-sympathetic protagonist in this unbalanced tale of love, perfidy and violence in Hotlanta."
Like Kelly's first novel (Anonymous Sources, 2013, this sophomore effort centers on a beautiful woman who inadvertently becomes involved in a dangerous, high-stakes situation that soon becomes a matter of life or death.Read full book review >
THE LAST FLIGHT OF POXL WEST by Daniel Torday
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"A richly layered, beautifully told and somehow lovable story about war, revenge and loss."
Elijah Goldstein's devoted Uncle Poxl is a Jewish World War II fighter pilot and an overnight literary sensation. What more could a boy want?Read full book review >

MADEMOISELLE CHANEL by C.W. Gortner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"An homage to a couture icon whose influence is still powerful today."
An admiring portrait of the designer who first modernized women's wear, told in the first person as she looks back over her life. Read full book review >
GARBO'S LAST STAND by Jon James Miller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"An appealing blend of hard-boiled noir and action-movie excitement with a romantic, worshipful heart."
In Miller's novel, a dying former tabloid reporter tells the story of his 1939 cruise-ship adventure—involving Greta Garbo, Nazis and a beautiful British secret agent—to a young journalist hoping for an exclusive. Read full book review >
THE EMPIRE OF THE SENSES by Alexis Landau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"Landau's talents suggest she might do well with a more directly historical novel, but she has produced some strong characters in this highly readable, oddly sanitized look at assimilation and its discontents."
This first novel follows one family through two wars, four romances and one death with enough thought and craft to remain several shelves above the potboiler section. Read full book review >

GROTESQUE by Emanuel Wears
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"Haunting look at bad science, bad parenting and the making of a damaged individual."
In this debut novel, Kent Tucker is sent to a state hospital in 1950s Appalachia to "cure" his homosexuality, leading to terrible compulsions and crimes as an adult. Read full book review >
OUR ENDLESS NUMBERED DAYS by Claire Fuller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2015

"Fuller's compelling coming-of-age story, narrated from the perspective of Peggy's return to civilization, is delivered in translucent prose. Although attuned readers will likely have foreseen the final revelations, this is memorable first work from a talent to watch."
What do you do if you're 8 and your father tells you the rest of the world has been annihilated and home is now a hut in the middle of nowhere? That's the situation in a British novelist's intriguing debut. Read full book review >
FINN by Christopher Brookhouse
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2015

"A novel to be savored more than once, written with the same languorous, rumbling passion of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward's film The Long Hot Summer."
Looking behind propriety's lace-curtain gentility into the hardwoods of sin, Brookhouse (Loving Ryan, 2010, etc.) offers pure Southern noir. Read full book review >
THE LISTENER by Rachel Basch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2015

"While Malcolm's trajectory feels complete, Noah's seems to be an afterthought in a novel that isn't really about him."
A young man struggling with his gender identity and a middle-aged psychologist connect with one another in Basch's (The Passion of Reverend Nash, 2003, etc.) complex and thoughtful new novel.Read full book review >
QUEEN OF FLOWERS AND PEARLS by Gabriella Ghermandi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 13, 2015

"This singular coming-of-age story defined by political upheaval and ancestral secrets introduces a sensitive, perceptive storyteller on the brink of womanhood."
Tales of the Ethiopian resistance during the Italian occupation haunt an extended family in this intricately woven debut novel by Ghermandi, who was born in Ethiopia and lives in Italy. Read full book review >
LOGOS by John Neeleman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Especially for those interested in theological history, an extraordinary amalgam of fiction and fact."
A fictional account of the birth of Christianity. Read full book review >
I WILL LOVE YOU FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE by Michael Czyzniejewski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"Heartbreak delivered by a few dozen tiny paper cuts."
Love stinks in these 29 microfictions about cheating, divorce and all kinds of splitting up. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >