Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 6)

GILDED CAGE  by Vic James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An absorbing first installment that presages an intriguing new fantasy series."
In a debut novel, James introduces readers to an alternate modern-day England where enticing drama and social unrest mix with aristocratic scandal and glamorous magic. Read full book review >
ALL THAT'S LEFT TO TELL by Daniel Lowe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A story about storytelling, stirring and effective."
The haunting tale of a severed bond between father and daughter. Read full book review >

THE YOUNG WIVES CLUB by Julie Pennell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A light novel in which women take charge of their own happily-ever-afters."
Marrying young seems romantic to four young Louisiana friends, but their Prince Charmings turn out to have clay feet. Read full book review >
JOURNEYMAN by Marc Bojanowski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Bojanowski's novel is layered and thoughtful but aspires to heights it doesn't quite reach."
A rootless carpenter searches for home in Bojanowksi's second novel (The Dog Fighter, 2004). Read full book review >
THE YEAR OF THE COMET by Sergei Lebedev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This gorgeously written, unsettling novel—a rare work about the fall of the Soviet Union as told through the eyes of a child—leaves us with a fresh understanding of that towering moment in recent history."
Lebedev follows up Oblivion (2016), his powerful novel about the atrocities of the gulag, with this autobiographical tale of a boy's coming-of-age during the years leading to the fall of the Soviet Union. Read full book review >

WINTER OF THE GODS  by Jordanna Max Brodsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A preposterous page-turner."
A follow-up to The Immortals (2016) in which ancient Greek gods assume 21st-century identities and band together to fight a threat to their millennia-old existence. Read full book review >
MIRANDA AND CALIBAN by Jacqueline Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Intriguing and impressive while remaining inextricable from its dramatic context."
In an eye-opening departure from her previous fantasy yarns (Poison Fruit, 2014, etc.), Carey reimagines the back story of Shakespeare's The Tempest as a tale of star-crossed lovers. Sort of. Read full book review >
WE WERE THE LUCKY ONES by Georgia Hunter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Too beholden to sentimentality and cliché, this novel fails to establish a uniquely realized perspective."
Hunter's debut novel tracks the experiences of her family members during the Holocaust. Read full book review >
BE MY WOLFF by Emma Richler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Long, slow-moving, and more than a little precious."
A self-consciously Dickensian account of an unconventional love from the author of Sister Crazy (2001) and the memoir Feed My Dear Dogs (2005). Read full book review >
THE NEARNESS OF YOU by Amanda Eyre Ward
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Looks like literary fiction, smells like literary fiction, tastes like literary fiction—but sensational developments, tabloid situations, and clairvoyant dreams take Ward's (This Same Sky, 2015,etc.) topical plot into telenovela territory."
A young surrogate mother changes her mind and goes AWOL. Read full book review >
THE FORTUNATE ONES by Ellen Umansky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Umansky's richly textured and peopled novel tells an emotionally and historically complicated story with so much skill and confidence it's hard to believe it's her first."
A missing painting connects the lives of Rose, a woman who escaped the Holocaust as a young girl, and Lizzie, a 37-year-old lawyer whose father just died. Read full book review >
THE DIME by Kathleen Kent
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing. Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman."
Kent (The Outcasts, 2013, etc.) introduces a tough and engaging new detective in this police thriller set in Dallas. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >