Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 7)

THE ORPHAN MOTHER by Robert Hicks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Satisfying historical fiction, of particular appeal to readers who live near the banks of the Harpeth or Cumberland."
Hicks (A Separate Country, 2009, etc.) extends his Tennessee-set historical saga into the years immediately following the Civil War. Read full book review >
THE GLOAMING by Melanie Finn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Remarkably well-paced and well-written, this novel ends with an existentially astute finale. Don't expect to be able to set this book down or forget its haunted characters."
A propulsive literary thriller toggles between Switzerland and Tanzania. Read full book review >

BLOOD CRIME by Sebastià Alzamora
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"If you've ever wondered what it's like to feel simultaneously bored and nauseous, this is the book for you."
A veteran police inspector in Barcelona must hunt down a vampire amid the turmoil of the Spanish Civil War. Honest to God. Read full book review >
LANDING by Laia Fàbregas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A finely crafted novel of either serendipity or fate—we never know."
An old man and a young woman sit next to each other on a flight. When the man dies and the woman walks off with a small wooden box he'd been carrying to show his son, their parallel personal histories become entwined, showing the serendipity of life. Read full book review >
A BRIEF THEORY OF TRAVEL AND THE DESERT by Cristian Crusat
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Haunting stories of sorrow and isolation."
A slim volume of six stories translated from Spanish focusing on the difficulties of communication and on the beauty—and emptiness—of the natural world. Read full book review >

SHELTER IN PLACE by Alexander Maksik
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"On every page we're reminded of the paradox of how mysterious, thorny, and delicate family relationships can be."
Maksik firmly creates the "place" as the Pacific Northwest, though his characters have a difficult time finding any kind of "shelter"—from place or from each other. Read full book review >
LONER by Teddy Wayne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A startlingly sharp study of not just collegiate culture, but of social forces at large; a novel as absorbing as it is devastating."
A stunning—and profoundly disconcerting—take on the campus novel, Wayne's (The Love Song of Jonny Valentine, 2013, etc.) latest is as dark as it is addictive. Read full book review >
LEAVE ME by Gayle Forman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An appealing fairy tale for the exhausted and underappreciated."
What if an overworked mother simply walked away? Could she find herself yet keep her abandoned family? Read full book review >
A WHOLE LIFE by Robert Seethaler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An elegant, understated book about a simple man still leaves something wanting."
In this quiet, serenely powerful novel, a man lives out his life in a remote mountain village as the bulk of the 20th century sweeps past. Read full book review >
BLACK WAVE by Michelle Tea
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A biting, sagacious, and delightfully dark metaliterary novel about finding your way in a world on fire."
Churning through lovers, baggies, and bottles, writer Michelle Leduski runs for LA with the end of the world on her heels. Read full book review >
THE BROTHER by Rein Raud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A slim but satisfying novel with archetypal resonances."
This Estonian novel draws on the trope of American Westerns—Clint Eastwood or Alan Ladd would have been extremely comfortable in the title role—in which a mysterious hero shows up on the scene, sets things right, and then disappears. Read full book review >
TWO SHE-BEARS by Meir Shalev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"This knotty, labyrinthine tale fails to add up to more than its parts."
A novel about love, desire, loss, and revenge in a small Israeli settlement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >